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Zack Rosebrugh

Good afternoon.

SCOTUS update

Metals.com scam

Amazon attrition

At the movies

Fashion forward

Reshaping society

Electric cars make their mark

2019 was the year electric vehicles grew up. From budget Kias to fleets of e-trucks, this was the biggest year for vehicular electrification yet—but several blockbuster launches belie a hard road ahead as automakers are forced to reinvent themselves.

2019 was the year electric cars grew up

Tesla flexed its muscle in the market even as overall EV sales softened. Global automakers have committed $225 billion toward electrification -- well past the point of no return despite 2019's worrying dip in EV sales (at least for cars not built by Tesla). Overall, it was the year things got serious

Tesla flexed its muscle in the market even as overall EV sales softened. Global automakers have committed $225 billion toward electrification -- well past the point of no return despite 2019's worrying dip in EV sales (at least for cars not built by Tesla). Overall, it was the year things got serious for EVs.Tesla has done the yeoman's work of proving you can sell a million or so electric cars to the masses. Its Model 3 accounted for 1 out of every 6 EVs sold worldwide. Now VW, GM, Ford, and others have painted a giant target on Tesla's back. Let the race begin.

Record low unemployment

Americans locked up abroad

Canopy branches out

Get smart about parenting

Raising a child is hard. But the “parenting is hard” trope, which feeds memes and dinner conversations, can be dangerous. It frames the problem as the individual failure of a single parent rather than as a social issue.

The hardest part of being a parent has nothing to do with raising kids

I always say we have to raise our girls to be brave, not perfect. But it's not enough for parents to try to do this work alone, we have to change as a society because our kids are getting messages from everywhere - media, school, classmates - so it's on all of us together.

See you later!

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Rethinking Retraining

Rethinking Retraining

Read more on Harvard Business Review

Contributions

  • I read a lot of articles on this topic and I thought this was a great one. To be successful programs need to address both the big picture issues as well as the programmatic ones. Getting older workers to believe they can be retrained and to come to the table is an important step. It’s not as easy as

    I read a lot of articles on this topic and I thought this was a great one. To be successful programs need to address both the big picture issues as well as the programmatic ones. Getting older workers to believe they can be retrained and to come to the table is an important step. It’s not as easy as - if you build it they will come.

  • Some very important points made in this article about how to develop and implement training programs in organizations that may have as many as four different generations of workers. In cases like these, it’s easy to see why the one-size-fits-all approach to learning and development may not work. Ensuring

    Some very important points made in this article about how to develop and implement training programs in organizations that may have as many as four different generations of workers. In cases like these, it’s easy to see why the one-size-fits-all approach to learning and development may not work. Ensuring all workers develop the skills needed for the future may require throwing out conventional wisdom and creating an ecosystem of educational solutions tailored specifically to each worker. From virtual classrooms to technology as teacher to stackable credits to personalized curricula, it may be time to move from a standard approach to one that provides a menu of educational options.

  • The pace of change from the massive technological advances is significant. The idea of a “Just-in-time” training, matching supply to demand, and short-term “snack-size” re-training programs are what we need to connect people with current and emerging opportunities. It’s important to note the confidence

    The pace of change from the massive technological advances is significant. The idea of a “Just-in-time” training, matching supply to demand, and short-term “snack-size” re-training programs are what we need to connect people with current and emerging opportunities. It’s important to note the confidence issue. People need to see a path which help them to believe they can get new skills, contribute to the society and make a living in different ways. This requires both public and private sectors supporting these development programs. #digitaltransformation #disruption #training #development

  • Important set of findings re retraining, which will be necessary for every worker as the workplace continues to transform as a result of technology and other trends. We (appropriately) invest huge amounts in educating people in the first two decades of their lives but far less in the rest of their lives

    Important set of findings re retraining, which will be necessary for every worker as the workplace continues to transform as a result of technology and other trends. We (appropriately) invest huge amounts in educating people in the first two decades of their lives but far less in the rest of their lives. Many also too easily dismiss the possibility of older workers learning new things (another “soft bigotry of low expectations”). Too often we hear, “50+ old workers won’t be able to retrain” but when supported appropriately (not saying this is an easy task), it’s possible!

  • As a Learning and Development Professional at Galvanize, Emeritus, and Springboard, I fundamentally see students of all ages, backgrounds and career journeys succeed in redeployment of their skills through training initiatives. As organizations set aside budgets for 2019, it is time to consider how retraining

    As a Learning and Development Professional at Galvanize, Emeritus, and Springboard, I fundamentally see students of all ages, backgrounds and career journeys succeed in redeployment of their skills through training initiatives. As organizations set aside budgets for 2019, it is time to consider how retraining valuable assets can improve a company rather than hiring new talent exclusively. Outcomes - whether in software engineering, data engineering or data science - must be related to productivity gains where employers can see tangible cost savings that compound across the organization year over year. Retraining is an investment that starts when firms are ready to think as digitally first companies that are for-profit in their industry, and for-profit to their employees.

  • I graduated with my BAs at 59 and my MPA at 61. I was a 4.0 in all of my studies. One of my obstacles to moving into a new career field has been the fear of competing with younger candidates, so I have remained where I am. This article and the positive comments offer hope

  • It was very interesting to see wraparound services as a strategy for workforce training and development for this demographic in this specific region of the states. In New York City, the current administration is looking at public hospitals and community schools as places for wraparound services for vulnerable

    It was very interesting to see wraparound services as a strategy for workforce training and development for this demographic in this specific region of the states. In New York City, the current administration is looking at public hospitals and community schools as places for wraparound services for vulnerable populations. This only make me more convinced that local governments have to talk to each other about new solutions, even if their dynamics and populations differ.

  • I think the society needs facilitate the condition in which people study.

    Under the current circumstance,you will be supposed to study and work simultaneously or commit to the learning fully with your pocket money.

    Cushion for falling back on will be necessary.

  • “ Older workers who are suddenly displaced often have little interest in extended programs. The people we talked to often had family responsibilities and were focused on quickly replacing their lost income streams. “

  • At 56, i have changed careers. This old dog can still learn albeit much slower.

  • wealth

  • Yeah