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Zack Rosebrugh

Good morning.

Electric cars make their mark

2019 was the year electric vehicles grew up. From budget Kias to fleets of e-trucks, this was the biggest year for vehicular electrification yet—but several blockbuster launches belie a hard road ahead as automakers are forced to reinvent themselves.

2019 was the year electric cars grew up

Tesla flexed its muscle in the market even as overall EV sales softened. Global automakers have committed $225 billion toward electrification -- well past the point of no return despite 2019's worrying dip in EV sales (at least for cars not built by Tesla). Overall, it was the year things got serious

Tesla flexed its muscle in the market even as overall EV sales softened. Global automakers have committed $225 billion toward electrification -- well past the point of no return despite 2019's worrying dip in EV sales (at least for cars not built by Tesla). Overall, it was the year things got serious for EVs.Tesla has done the yeoman's work of proving you can sell a million or so electric cars to the masses. Its Model 3 accounted for 1 out of every 6 EVs sold worldwide. Now VW, GM, Ford, and others have painted a giant target on Tesla's back. Let the race begin.

Record low unemployment

Americans locked up abroad

Canopy branches out

The future of finance

Solving the climate crisis

The way we colonize Mars says a lot about how we address climate change. Is repeating our mistakes on another planet the answer to our existential crises?

The problems we’re solving for on Earth will only follow us to Mars

The most important sentence in this article for me is: “Imagine all the things we could do on Earth if we allocated an extra $22.6 billion to addressing climate change on our own planet?”.

Space exploration has undoubtedly kickstarted a raft of technological innovations we’ve all benefited from (insulin

The most important sentence in this article for me is: “Imagine all the things we could do on Earth if we allocated an extra $22.6 billion to addressing climate change on our own planet?”.

Space exploration has undoubtedly kickstarted a raft of technological innovations we’ve all benefited from (insulin pumps, solar cells, artificial limbs to name a few). So in my mind, it’s only worth spending all this money on getting to and living on Mars, if in doing so, we develop technology that also helps us solve all our very real problems here on Earth.

Get smart about parenting

Raising a child is hard. But the “parenting is hard” trope, which feeds memes and dinner conversations, can be dangerous. It frames the problem as the individual failure of a single parent rather than as a social issue.

The hardest part of being a parent has nothing to do with raising kids

I always say we have to raise our girls to be brave, not perfect. But it's not enough for parents to try to do this work alone, we have to change as a society because our kids are getting messages from everywhere - media, school, classmates - so it's on all of us together.

How Gen Z is changing Tinder

Disrupting dementia

Next-generation dementia care could learn from cancer care. Palliative care helps patients in their final months, and is often used for people suffering from end-stage cancer. But it can actually help anyone who has a long-term, chronic illness, and it could be especially effective for people living with dementia. ✦

Next-generation dementia care could learn a lesson from cancer care

In the 1950s, a single British physician named Cicely Saunders championed a new kind of care for terminally-ill cancer patients. She found that relieving pain and suffering made them happier—and ironically, live longer, even if drugs couldn't actually treat their condition.

That was the birth of hospice

In the 1950s, a single British physician named Cicely Saunders championed a new kind of care for terminally-ill cancer patients. She found that relieving pain and suffering made them happier—and ironically, live longer, even if drugs couldn't actually treat their condition.

That was the birth of hospice, which is a form of palliative care for the last six months of a person's life. Hospice, however, is a form of palliative care, which in general just means person-centered care. Sometimes, this means using life-saving interventions, like antibiotics for an infection. Other times, it means just making sue the person is comfortable. It depends on what the person and their caregivers want.

Palliative care could save dementia care, which is the more expensive in the last five years of life than cancer and heart disease. It could also save health care in general; it's cheaper than the current care systems in place. The trouble is, because it was historically used for cancer treatment, that's how most doctors think of it. Luckily, a few hospitals are testing out palliative care. If their results are good, it could expand nation-wide.

The rising price of immigration

The sole airline willing to deport high-risk immigrants is price-gouging ICE. There is only one carrier willing to take on US deportation flights and they're charging the US government nearly double the normal price, making flights as expensive as $33,500 per hour in November.

Sole airline willing to deport high-risk immigrants is price-gouging ICE

A basic lesson in supply and demand, as seen through the lens of ICE Air ops in an unredacted ICE document we obtained. ICE can only obtain the Boeing 767s required for its so-called SHRC (special high-risk charter) flights from one company in the entire country, because it's the only firm willing to

A basic lesson in supply and demand, as seen through the lens of ICE Air ops in an unredacted ICE document we obtained. ICE can only obtain the Boeing 767s required for its so-called SHRC (special high-risk charter) flights from one company in the entire country, because it's the only firm willing to take the contract for fear of negative press. But last month, those 767s were tied up with other, richer customers (i.e. the Dept. of Defense). So ICE was forced to take whatever the carrier offered—a 777 that was a couple of hundred seats bigger than what ICE needed, and double the price: $33,000/flight hr vs $17,000/flight hr. The company knows it's the only game in town and has no incentive to meet ICE halfway, according to ICE's primary charter broker, explaining why it can't put any pressure on the subcontractor to come down on its rate.

Every now and then, my faith is restored that the markets really know how to do their job. I'll use this as a lesson tonight to teach my kid the basics about supply and demand, and about how actions have consequences.

This is a super illuminating piece that shows the complexity of immigration control, public protest, and the business of deportation. Because ICE has garnered so much criticism few companies want to risk a public backlash and run the agency's charters. In fact, only one does it, which means it can charge

This is a super illuminating piece that shows the complexity of immigration control, public protest, and the business of deportation. Because ICE has garnered so much criticism few companies want to risk a public backlash and run the agency's charters. In fact, only one does it, which means it can charge whatever it wants.

Justin shows here how much this lack of competition is costing US taxpayers. It doesn't mean we should support all of ICE's activities but it does expose a dark side to an already dark law enforcement project.

The real life Irishman

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Internal Facebook memo sees outgoing VP of comms Schrage take blame for hiring Definers

Internal Facebook memo sees outgoing VP of comms Schrage take blame for hiring Definers

Read more on TechCrunch

Contributions

  • His pay out should be impressive. But ultimately this revelation actually goes to further puncturing the Sandberg myth, of the idea of the woman as the goodly nurturer, incapable of evil. Whereas, we now see Sandberg's no better than Ivanka Trump or Betsy DeVos. But because she's a techie and she cozied

    His pay out should be impressive. But ultimately this revelation actually goes to further puncturing the Sandberg myth, of the idea of the woman as the goodly nurturer, incapable of evil. Whereas, we now see Sandberg's no better than Ivanka Trump or Betsy DeVos. But because she's a techie and she cozied up to the Democrats, she was meant to have some kind of Teflon halo.

  • This is their move? Really? Cause I thought the buck stopped at the top not at the VP level

  • “COO Sheryl Sandberg left a comment on the memo, saying it was never Facebook’s intention to play into anti-semitic theories about George Soros.” Right. But she had no problem reporting a genuine protest group as anti Semitic to the ADL, which to my knowledge was either used like a tool to promote FB’s

    “COO Sheryl Sandberg left a comment on the memo, saying it was never Facebook’s intention to play into anti-semitic theories about George Soros.” Right. But she had no problem reporting a genuine protest group as anti Semitic to the ADL, which to my knowledge was either used like a tool to promote FB’s dishonest agenda or is an accomplice in FB’s dirty tactics, until it issues a retraction or correction, if it hasn’t already. Otherwise it risks losing its authority as a fact-checking authority and bulwark against antisemitism and hate groups and hate speech. Also, why is the FB board backing a COO that sought to conceal vital information from it? Regardless, it’s time to regulate FB to the hilt or shut it down. How many people must die before the world recognizes that FB is inimical to democracy and does almost nothing to stop violence abroad? It in effect steals or commodifies our data and securitizes our identities with no transparency, oversight, or compensation (payment for labor and intellectual property) for users’ personal data, which is the user’s currency, free labor, intellectual property, time, and personal, financial, physical, and even national security? Let’s admit it—FB is the only company in history I know of to admit without a court order, settlement, or agreement that using its product is unhealthy. The UN condemned FB for its role In the genocide and ethnic cleansing of the Rohyingya in Myanmar. WhatsApp offers no privacy if someone hits “publish” on a group chat, revealing users’ phone numbers and compromising users’ safety and privacy. FB is inimical to privacy, unhealthy, and it’s led to riots and deaths in so many countries, and it is designed to reward trolls, mayhem, and disinformation, which is cheaper and more popular than more expensive real news. Just shut it down or regulate it. And fire MZ and definitely Sandberg. You can’t lie to a board or conceal info from it. I know Trillium and Scott Stringer want them gone, and more and more others each day. Enough is enough. FB is not neutral. It is unethical at best, dishonest in reality, and evil at worst. None of it is good.

  • Facebook needs to figure their business out. Unfortunately the public and businesses can’t turn their backs on FB. It is officially embedded into the fabric of mass communications, technology and everyday lives.

    I do feel that eventually Mark and the bad seeds that created the monster will be pushed

    Facebook needs to figure their business out. Unfortunately the public and businesses can’t turn their backs on FB. It is officially embedded into the fabric of mass communications, technology and everyday lives.

    I do feel that eventually Mark and the bad seeds that created the monster will be pushed out due to regulations that will come into play. It is only so long tech giants will be able to roam unchecked. But if the government wants to protect citizens and users, they need to become smarter about technology. Not look like a deer in headlights like Orrin Hatch did at the hearing.

  • It seems there may be more falling on the sword activity in the upcoming future of FaceBook. FB appears to have struggled to reach an appropriate response to public outcries and Congressional inquiry by taking a 'Don't look at us, or me, only, look at what the other guys are doing,' which was disingenous

    It seems there may be more falling on the sword activity in the upcoming future of FaceBook. FB appears to have struggled to reach an appropriate response to public outcries and Congressional inquiry by taking a 'Don't look at us, or me, only, look at what the other guys are doing,' which was disingenous on the onset and ripe for failure to launch an effective crisis communicatons strategy. In this continuously changing digital landscape of socmed, among the many lessons that could be learned by FB, one should be to always prepare for leveled, well thought-through and prudent crisis responses to potentially controversial business operations. Given that, monetization of socmed services via commercialization is the status quo, socmed entities should and must consider balancing the business need with the public good or directly, to say, the customers best interest, to wit, developing a sound business model/practice around achieving this balance that works for the bottomline and customers right to quality products and servces is essential. Otherwise, for FB, and its distant, socmed same space relatives, crisis communications may become more of the norm, than the exception.

  • FB needs to be regulated like traditional media, but I also have no idea how they'd do that at scale--like reviewing ads before they run. It's going to be very messy to regulate.