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Richard A. Chance

Good afternoon.

The impeachment report report

SpaceX takes off

It's the most wonderful time of the year?

Phones aren't always our friends

Uber everywhere

The way we age now

New planet, same problems

The start of an epidemic

Obscure state regulations gave birth to the opioid crisis. Five states—California, Idaho, Illinois, New York, and Texas—were subject to a "triple threat" of conditions that left them particularly susceptible to a flood of painkillers.

Obscure state regulations gave birth to the opioid crisis

Economists use different kinds of experiments to test theories, and a particularly effective type is a "natural experiment," where otherwise similar companies or countries might use different strategies or policies. That's what happened with US states at the birth of the opioid crisis, when some states

Economists use different kinds of experiments to test theories, and a particularly effective type is a "natural experiment," where otherwise similar companies or countries might use different strategies or policies. That's what happened with US states at the birth of the opioid crisis, when some states made it harder for doctors to prescribe drugs like oxycontin, while others had no such barriers. According to a new paper, Purdue Pharma understood the difference, and eagerly exploited it.

Disrupting dementia

Science can’t fix dementia’s most heartbreaking problem. No matter how far science advances, it will never be able to tell you how to personally deal with a dementia diagnosis. ✦

Science can’t fix dementia’s most heartbreaking problem

As a science journalist, I believe there's always an answer for how to do things. That's why reporting this story was so hard: I learned there IS no guidebook for taking care of a person with dementia. It's scary and lonely and heartbreaking.

I cried while interviewing my parents for this story, and

As a science journalist, I believe there's always an answer for how to do things. That's why reporting this story was so hard: I learned there IS no guidebook for taking care of a person with dementia. It's scary and lonely and heartbreaking.

I cried while interviewing my parents for this story, and choked up talking to my friend, and a stranger. It was an eye opening experience, and I'm grateful they shared their stories.

An excellent journalistic piece that integrates the human element successfully with the stakes of the successes of scientific research (here finding cures for the many forms of dementia). Also, an excellent example of why science journalists are essential in bridging the gap between the hard reality

An excellent journalistic piece that integrates the human element successfully with the stakes of the successes of scientific research (here finding cures for the many forms of dementia). Also, an excellent example of why science journalists are essential in bridging the gap between the hard reality of patients and their families, and the surgical/cold eye of scientists and healthcare practitioners on these devastating diseases.

Bitcoin crime doesn't pay

Visit Rwanda, Again!

The US jobs report is coming

Our crystal ball says you'll be back

Close
Bitcoin for payments a distant dream as usage dries up

Bitcoin for payments a distant dream as usage dries up

Read more on Reuters

Contributions

  • The point of bitcoin and cryptocurrency is its use as a method of payment. Without that it’s not an asset and therefore it’s entirely useless.

  • All currencies including USD are already digitized. You can use PayPal, ACH, wire, Venmo etc to transfer the money. Bitcoin doesn’t solve any real world problems other than facilitating illegal money transfer. I can’t think of any problem that Bitcoin actually solves.

  • You don't need cryptocurrency to send a digital payment. You just need a digital ledger. The promise of crypto is that you don't need to trust that someone is keeping an accurate record of your digital ledger - it's independently verifiable.

    People thought that cryptocurrencies would accelerate digital

    You don't need cryptocurrency to send a digital payment. You just need a digital ledger. The promise of crypto is that you don't need to trust that someone is keeping an accurate record of your digital ledger - it's independently verifiable.

    People thought that cryptocurrencies would accelerate digital payments because crypto is digital. But a brand new currency is a significant headwind to use in everyday life, even if it has a semi-stable value.

    There are many other technologies accelerating digital payments, and as those mature, we'll see digital payments grow. Crypto will be part of the digital payments industry for a lot of reasons. But so will fiat. And that's not a bad thing.

  • It would have been more useful to look at the number of transactions made rather than the payments volume, since that’s tied to the price of bitcoin.

  • The aggregated number of confirmed bitcoin transactions in the last 24 hours: 256,183

    The number of transactions waiting to be confirmed: 3,421,746

    This was printed by Blockchain Luxembourg.

  • I have been counseling my client to avoid Bitcoin. I think this crypto currency, as well as others, will eventually fail due to government intervention, first the totalitarian governments will forbid, in interest of controlling their citizens and their money. Then the Western countries will regulate

    I have been counseling my client to avoid Bitcoin. I think this crypto currency, as well as others, will eventually fail due to government intervention, first the totalitarian governments will forbid, in interest of controlling their citizens and their money. Then the Western countries will regulate Bitcoins to irrelevance, due to criminal money laundering, tax avoidance, and financial manipulation. Bitcoin sounds exciting, but fraught with risk.