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Researchers estimate that Python, Javascript, and R contribute billions to GDP

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Contributions

  • The way we value “work” is core to the values we reflect to the world.

    Do we only value work associated with $? Both open source developers and parents may agree on this one...

  • They also orchestrate pretty much all the revenue made on the internet, somehow leaving the statement less impressive...at the same time...

    Yes, coding languages, like natural languages, are mediums for commerce and communication. Apparently this is a paradigm that is too complex for the effective

    They also orchestrate pretty much all the revenue made on the internet, somehow leaving the statement less impressive...at the same time...

    Yes, coding languages, like natural languages, are mediums for commerce and communication. Apparently this is a paradigm that is too complex for the effective humanity available in Silicon Valley to compute.

  • My company's software is built on open-source software. We wouldn't be here were it not for the millions of lines of code and innumerable hours that went into building the platforms we use to bring our service to life. Donations to open-source foundations are generally not tax deductible. This is a shame

    My company's software is built on open-source software. We wouldn't be here were it not for the millions of lines of code and innumerable hours that went into building the platforms we use to bring our service to life. Donations to open-source foundations are generally not tax deductible. This is a shame because they generate real economic returns. Just think how many companies wouldn't exist without Linux!

  • Some of the value lost in direct GDP calculation is captured in other ways (GDP is calculated in 3 different ways that must equate themselves). Part of it is savings and profits. A company that uses free software instead of purchased, for instance, saves money and incurs value that may reflect in profits/loss

    Some of the value lost in direct GDP calculation is captured in other ways (GDP is calculated in 3 different ways that must equate themselves). Part of it is savings and profits. A company that uses free software instead of purchased, for instance, saves money and incurs value that may reflect in profits/loss. Companies that would not exist otherwise reflect this value in their very existence- programmers hired, servers used etc.

  • There are a lot of issues with looking at economic success via GDP, and this story points out a fresh angle - GDP doesn't account for the value that's been generated by use of free coding languages.

    "They find that based on the typical pay of computer programmers, the cost to develop the Github code

    There are a lot of issues with looking at economic success via GDP, and this story points out a fresh angle - GDP doesn't account for the value that's been generated by use of free coding languages.

    "They find that based on the typical pay of computer programmers, the cost to develop the Github code for these languages would be over $3 billion—much of which was unpaid for. This is a very low-end estimate: A great deal of the code is not on Github and these are only four of the many open-source languages. The actual value could be magnitudes greater."

  • 100% true statement as these languages are fundamental to web development, data science, artificial intelligence, and automation.

  • Tools are the most valuable invention. If you categorize Nobel Prizes awarded for scientific discoveries against development of tools, the latter will win.

  • Should I be concerned my little brother knows how to code in all these and I don’t?

  • This is like saying a hammer is responsible for a real estate boom.

  • Coders who freely contribute to the development of open source projects do so for other benefits aside from simply producing a product that can be sold later. Quantifying the value of open source projects in the same way that we quantify the value commercial projects seems to minimize the value of community

    Coders who freely contribute to the development of open source projects do so for other benefits aside from simply producing a product that can be sold later. Quantifying the value of open source projects in the same way that we quantify the value commercial projects seems to minimize the value of community contribution and accessibility, among other benefits that this unique class of tools offer.