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Zack Rosebrugh

Good morning.

Metals.com scam

Amazon attrition

At the movies

Fashion forward

Reshaping society

Electric cars make their mark

2019 was the year electric vehicles grew up. From budget Kias to fleets of e-trucks, this was the biggest year for vehicular electrification yet—but several blockbuster launches belie a hard road ahead as automakers are forced to reinvent themselves.

2019 was the year electric cars grew up

Tesla flexed its muscle in the market even as overall EV sales softened. Global automakers have committed $225 billion toward electrification -- well past the point of no return despite 2019's worrying dip in EV sales (at least for cars not built by Tesla). Overall, it was the year things got serious

Tesla flexed its muscle in the market even as overall EV sales softened. Global automakers have committed $225 billion toward electrification -- well past the point of no return despite 2019's worrying dip in EV sales (at least for cars not built by Tesla). Overall, it was the year things got serious for EVs.Tesla has done the yeoman's work of proving you can sell a million or so electric cars to the masses. Its Model 3 accounted for 1 out of every 6 EVs sold worldwide. Now VW, GM, Ford, and others have painted a giant target on Tesla's back. Let the race begin.

Record low unemployment

Americans locked up abroad

Canopy branches out

Get smart about parenting

Raising a child is hard. But the “parenting is hard” trope, which feeds memes and dinner conversations, can be dangerous. It frames the problem as the individual failure of a single parent rather than as a social issue.

The hardest part of being a parent has nothing to do with raising kids

I always say we have to raise our girls to be brave, not perfect. But it's not enough for parents to try to do this work alone, we have to change as a society because our kids are getting messages from everywhere - media, school, classmates - so it's on all of us together.

See you later!

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If your CEO has a coach, maybe you deserve one too

Read more on Quartz

Contributions

  • Understanding your “why” is so important when it comes to motivation. I personally benefited from having an executive coach early in my career thanks to my former employer Microsoft, which became my motivation behind founding Tenshey. Coaches can help employees discover their values, tie them to the

    Understanding your “why” is so important when it comes to motivation. I personally benefited from having an executive coach early in my career thanks to my former employer Microsoft, which became my motivation behind founding Tenshey. Coaches can help employees discover their values, tie them to the work they do and help them to harness their own superpowers. Having engaged and motivated employees are beneficial to company culture and productivity.

  • It's very cool to see the new wave of career coaching that's extending it deeper into organizations. I think an experienced human, such as one you can access through some of the coaching platforms, is the best approach—though I suppose and AI chatbot could be better than nothing. I had a great coach

    It's very cool to see the new wave of career coaching that's extending it deeper into organizations. I think an experienced human, such as one you can access through some of the coaching platforms, is the best approach—though I suppose and AI chatbot could be better than nothing. I had a great coach a number of years ago, really benefited from the time with her, and would do it again. She said simple things that no one else could easily say—I'll never forget how she accurately assessed my body language—which was really helpful.

  • We’re becoming much more integrated into our careers: for many (myself included) they represent our personal missions, our mechanism self-actualization, sense of self-worth, community (and oftentimes our cafeterias, gyms, and healthcare clinics). Even the best manager can’t help you sort through all

    We’re becoming much more integrated into our careers: for many (myself included) they represent our personal missions, our mechanism self-actualization, sense of self-worth, community (and oftentimes our cafeterias, gyms, and healthcare clinics). Even the best manager can’t help you sort through all of the intricacies (ie challenges and expectations) of this thing we call “work.” The question about coaching is it very much still feels grassroots with limited regulation. Is there a risk to letting people (w/o the right expertise) into our biggest challenges and insecurities?

  • We all need support to do our best work. As work changes these kinds of new benefits will be increasingly important - and even though theoretically you might”coach people out” for purpose driven companies you want those who are most motivated to be in their job, so even that would work to the employer’s benefit

  • As the son of two psychologists, I’m always skeptical about professionals that advise people on issues of [physical/mental/professional] health without accredited training. But in my reporting for this piece, I came around to the idea of career coaches for everyone. They just make so much sense. Managers

    As the son of two psychologists, I’m always skeptical about professionals that advise people on issues of [physical/mental/professional] health without accredited training. But in my reporting for this piece, I came around to the idea of career coaches for everyone. They just make so much sense. Managers, friends, family will all project themselves in the advice they give. As careers become less linear, I wouldn’t be surprised if coaches become the norm, not the exception.

  • Whether it’s an AI or a human, sometimes the best coach simply draws your attention back to the real priorities.

  • I would absolutely love a coach if we could afford one. Maybe this is the new apprenticeship / mentoring model?

    The next best thing are all the podcasts and books that are out there, so I’ll settle for that. Been invaluable so far

  • I think a coach is always a good thing as they help test your assumptions about how you’re looking at an issue. It’s ultimately up to you to solve and this sounds like a great way to democratize it and bring it to the masses.

  • I’ve always believed coaching wasn’t only for the c-suite. I’m so happy to see that the benefits of coaching are becoming more accessible and valued.

  • It’s an interesting way to look at career in a different aspect. However I always thought that a coach should be someone who knows you well, or at least who once involve in your life. So that they might be able to give you “personal” suggestions instead of a “formal” suggestions.

    But anyway I think

    It’s an interesting way to look at career in a different aspect. However I always thought that a coach should be someone who knows you well, or at least who once involve in your life. So that they might be able to give you “personal” suggestions instead of a “formal” suggestions.

    But anyway I think this is a really awesome idea! I would personally want to try this service.

  • Impartiality is the key to coaching. Management and HR have incentives differing from an individual employee. Having a safe, outside perspective is of incredible value. I am thrilled coaching is becoming more accessible to more employees.

    We founded Parabol to address a different coaching gap: coaching

    Impartiality is the key to coaching. Management and HR have incentives differing from an individual employee. Having a safe, outside perspective is of incredible value. I am thrilled coaching is becoming more accessible to more employees.

    We founded Parabol to address a different coaching gap: coaching the team. We found folks need help to reduce the time necessary to build trust, establish working habits that serve the team, and develop systems for clarifying roles, processes, decision making and even conflict resolution.

    Business has been good!

  • This sounds awesome in theory. I’ve got to wonder how it could be manipulated though (maybe less of a concern if the coaches are third parties). Could a coach help convince employees to *not* seek a raise and more responsibility? Also it still seems like coaching is a luxury—and one that depends strongly

    This sounds awesome in theory. I’ve got to wonder how it could be manipulated though (maybe less of a concern if the coaches are third parties). Could a coach help convince employees to *not* seek a raise and more responsibility? Also it still seems like coaching is a luxury—and one that depends strongly on what an employee is willing to put into it.

  • How much of it is Conversational Design, from a trained and insightful AI or human?

  • “Career-coaching-as-a-service” is coming into vogue. And it’s about time!

  • Years ago I worked at a non profit where the CEO had a career coach. He was the only person offered the perk. He was certainly the least deserving as well as the least likely to benefit from the opportunity. It’s nice to see several companies finally democratizing the benefit.

  • BetterUp