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The Planet Has Seen Sudden Warming Before. It Wiped Out Almost Everything.

By The New York Times

In some ways, the planet's worst mass extinction — 250 million years ago, at the end of the Permian Period — may parallel climate change todayRead full story

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  • We have a hard enough time getting along now as is. Wait until we’re competing with each other for *oxygen.*

  • This study shows how fragile the extraordinary balance that has allowed life to flourish on earth is. We can experience it everyday in our bodies. The slightest bacteria or microbe can make us sick or kill us. If our body temperature goes up or down by a few degrees, we become sick or worse. But somehow, many people fail to understand that the same fragility characterizes life in general. And we are taking the greatest possible risk by ignoring this risk with our unabated CO2 emissions and destruction of biodiversity.

  • Whet Moser
    Whet MoserDeputy editor, Obsession at Quartz

    Even setting aside the chilling ramifications about climate change, this is a fascinating study about extinction.

  • Stone Age melting of ice caused migrations to the UK and Antarctica is basically a freezing cold desert.

    The earth does what it wants mercilessly and without consent. We are definitely speeding things up with our coal dependencies and propensity to throw trash in the ocean.

  • Alan Chan
    Alan ChanManaging Partner at Vectr Ventures

    We all need to get going on a mission to save ourselves from ourselves and focus on what matters!

  • Kenny Bresson
    Kenny BressonTranslator at UZABASE, Inc.

    Human beings have continued to face challenges with adapting to natural phenomena ever since they began to find their place in the world. But we're in fascinating times! We are gaining knowledge on how the Earth ebbs and flows naturally, but also our effect on nature. We've also made tremendous strides in bettering our own lives. Unfortunately, this has taken a toll on the environment and other animals. But thankfully, awareness of our effect on the planet is growing.

    Now we face a major challenge

    Human beings have continued to face challenges with adapting to natural phenomena ever since they began to find their place in the world. But we're in fascinating times! We are gaining knowledge on how the Earth ebbs and flows naturally, but also our effect on nature. We've also made tremendous strides in bettering our own lives. Unfortunately, this has taken a toll on the environment and other animals. But thankfully, awareness of our effect on the planet is growing.

    Now we face a major challenge - how can we continue to better our lives while also mitigating our negative effects on the environment and other creatures? I believe that the answer does not lie in hype-based governmental policies, but rather a simultaneous mix of continuous scientific/technological development, economic development that takes into consideration both the health of the environment and the well-being of the world's inhabitants, and cooperation within and between societies.

  • Patrick deHahn
    Patrick deHahnNews curator at Quartz

    Scary to read this line: "In some ways, the planet's worst mass extinction — 250 million years ago, at the end of the Permian Period — may parallel climate change today."

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