Skip to navigationSkip to content

The absurd quest to make the "best" razor

By Vox

The $3.5 billion shaving industry is secretive and litigious — and disrupting itself sillyRead full story

Comments

  • Also share to
  • Really, the prime comment is straight from the article: “For decades, the razor has been marketed to men as a tool, a piece of machinery, and for decades, it has been marketed to women as a waterfall, a goddess’s sigh, the smell of coconut, the kiss of a beach babe, the glitter of a poolside bartender’s immaculate grin — he loves your calves. They are so clean, have always been clean, hairless is clean, and you have never seen something dirty in your life.”

  • I shave every day. A couple years ago I bought razors from Gillette, Schick, Dollar Shave Club, and Harry’s to see which I liked best. What I discovered really surprised me. In the four-blade category, Gillette blades were the best. What really surprised me was that Gillette’s three-blade razor provided a meaningfully better shave than any four-blade razor, especially under my nostrils. Remarkably, even Gillette’s two-blade razor did a better job than the four-blade razors. Dollar Shave Club acknowledged

    I shave every day. A couple years ago I bought razors from Gillette, Schick, Dollar Shave Club, and Harry’s to see which I liked best. What I discovered really surprised me. In the four-blade category, Gillette blades were the best. What really surprised me was that Gillette’s three-blade razor provided a meaningfully better shave than any four-blade razor, especially under my nostrils. Remarkably, even Gillette’s two-blade razor did a better job than the four-blade razors. Dollar Shave Club acknowledged the “under the nose” issue with a smaller blade on the back, but every time I used it I drew blood, which was distressing. Harry’s was so disappointing that I have a small drawer full of razors that came after I cancelled my subscription.

  • it is a big business but there seems to be a lot of macho silliness in the world of shaving

  • Over the years I’ve become intolerant of absurdly expensive razor cartridges. I recall a time when Gillette was the only game in town and the stupid-silly expense for their nonsensical razor blades was almost a laughable necessity. When Dollar Shave Club hit the scene at half the price, it was a welcome relief. The razors were just as useless as Gillette’s but were fairly priced. This article didn’t help me feel better about Gillette. They still seem like scumbag oriented company with transparent

    Over the years I’ve become intolerant of absurdly expensive razor cartridges. I recall a time when Gillette was the only game in town and the stupid-silly expense for their nonsensical razor blades was almost a laughable necessity. When Dollar Shave Club hit the scene at half the price, it was a welcome relief. The razors were just as useless as Gillette’s but were fairly priced. This article didn’t help me feel better about Gillette. They still seem like scumbag oriented company with transparent, fake innovation that prefers litigation to product value.

  • There is so much “disruption” that I’ve just let my beard grow.

  • replacement blades for my double-edged safety razor... which is based on a 19th century razor design... cost about $0.12 each. I’ve never nicked myself, and I don’t miss my Gillette

  • I have an old safety razor, the ones you turn the bottom, the top opens and you drop a blade in its the best razor I've had in 55 years

  • If clothes are an indicator of formality in the workplace, the razor industry will continue to decline without an impactful rebound. Shaving your face sucks and if it doesn’t need to be done it won’t be.

  • It's as old as commerce. Create a market, corner market. Simple. People over 'anal'ize things. Most things are simple, unless you're a salseman who's trying 'dazzle em with bullshit'.oh, never mind, I don't have to shave anything, anyway... "'convince' them that you have a better mousetrap, and they will beat a path to your door."

  • Pull quote: “We see it time and again — with the hotel industry, with cable TV, now with razors: Shrinking markets are not allowed to simply shrink, but instead inspire aggressive pandering, bizarre advertising, and nichification of products that have no reason to be so differentiated.”

    Brilliant and amusing analysis by @kait_tiffany @voxdotcom

Want more conversations like this?

Join the Quartz community for all the intelligence, without the noise.

App Store BadgeGoogle Play Badge
Leaderboard Screenshot

A community of leaders, subject matter experts, and curious minds bringing nuance back to how we talk about the news.

Editors' Picks Screenshot

No content overload: our editors will curate the most notable and discussion-worthy pieces for you every day.

Share Screenshot

Don’t just read the story, tell it: contribute your ideas and experience to the dialogue.