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Rising Instagram Stars Are Posting Fake Sponsored Content

Rising Instagram Stars Are Posting Fake Sponsored Content

Read more on The Atlantic

Contributions

  • The increasing consumerisation of Instagram foretells a sad future. Social media already presents a false ideal but this insta-generation fake posting brand sponsorship for "street cred" is a whole new low. Will there be any authenticity left in the future?

  • Great piece, and I wonder: Just who *really* gives a shit about ad targeting and digital privacy? Curious, @TaylorLorenz, if that ever comes up in your reporting w/ teens.

  • Wow. I never thought I would see the day where people pretend to “sell out” for free on a continuous basis for street cred all the while a company is upset because people repping his sunglasses on social media for free don’t meet his quality standards. It’s like I’m living in bizarro world.

  • This principle applied to everything, on repeat.

  • This is not that different from any content creator feeling pressure - or strategically deciding- to publish content free with the hopes of being paid .. eventually. Many publications, even prestigious ones, encourge thought leaders to write pieces for status and prestige- often with no pay. And many

    This is not that different from any content creator feeling pressure - or strategically deciding- to publish content free with the hopes of being paid .. eventually. Many publications, even prestigious ones, encourge thought leaders to write pieces for status and prestige- often with no pay. And many thought leaders approach the publications themselves eager to do so. The key difference here is many of these influencers are super young and are spending their own money to fund the exposure. Very few will truly be able to lift their influencer status into long term sustainable businesses

  • Oh great now our teens are being trained on a social existence of fake online personas and always try to sell what others are selling...where is the place in this equation for them to just be themselves?

  • Well, it’s manipulative and sly, but it works effectively for influencers. A high schooler stated that merely stating that they had sponsored content resulted in added popularity among their peers and more Instagram followers. The same applies outside of high school, only as adults, it’ll produce many

    Well, it’s manipulative and sly, but it works effectively for influencers. A high schooler stated that merely stating that they had sponsored content resulted in added popularity among their peers and more Instagram followers. The same applies outside of high school, only as adults, it’ll produce many more opportunities - and much more money. We’re easily swayed by what we see online, so there’s no shock in that being taken advantage of.

  • The best advertising is just to show companies what you can do. Give them a test run. It’s hardly a new strategy, but this piece deliciously dissects it in the context of Instagram influencers, a marketing category — usually populated by young, rather self-involved people — that many people love to hate.

  • Instagram is influencer hell. “People pretend to have brand deals to seem cool,” Allie said. “It’s a thing, like, I got this for free while all you losers are paying.”

    I'm (only sightly) amazed high school students compete to create free ads and promotional campaign for brands. In the 20th century

    Instagram is influencer hell. “People pretend to have brand deals to seem cool,” Allie said. “It’s a thing, like, I got this for free while all you losers are paying.”

    I'm (only sightly) amazed high school students compete to create free ads and promotional campaign for brands. In the 20th century, it was really impressive brands made advertising their logo on a shirt a fashion statement. But convincing people to turn their entire vacations into fake ads for Voss water and Maybelline, well that's next level capitalism. 👏👏

  • Lol. This twist is not something I ever could have predicted would ever happen: "A decade ago, shilling products to your fans may have been seen as selling out. Now it’s a sign of success." This goes to show that "wanting to be an influencer" is more about vanity and greed than any desire to offer any

    Lol. This twist is not something I ever could have predicted would ever happen: "A decade ago, shilling products to your fans may have been seen as selling out. Now it’s a sign of success." This goes to show that "wanting to be an influencer" is more about vanity and greed than any desire to offer any kind of more altruistic real personal contribution. Why do their followers fall for it though?