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A Nobel Prize-winning psychologist says most people don’t really want to be happy

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Contributions

  • Growing up in Guam, we were taught from very young that our purpose as humans is to nurture and protect the community we are a part of, and that in order to do this, we must always push ourselves to be our best selves. We were told our best selves could be anything as long it served our community - teachers

    Growing up in Guam, we were taught from very young that our purpose as humans is to nurture and protect the community we are a part of, and that in order to do this, we must always push ourselves to be our best selves. We were told our best selves could be anything as long it served our community - teachers, doctors, nurses, auto mechanics, hula dancers, coconut tree climbers, fishers, and campfire makers (the last three were the most important during typhoon season when we had limited fresh water and food, no electricity and limited supply of propane gas).

    Life satisfaction is connected to nurturing/protecting the community we live in.

  • There are some good ideas here, but I think it is more complex. It raises many questions for me. What beliefs drive the narrative of a person’s life, what values? Are all equal in their ability to provide a perception of meaning? How does this research complement or contrast with research on mindfulness and equanimity?

  • Happiness is a direct result of happenstance. Something happens that resonates with you, and you become temporarily happy.

    What we need more of in our lives is joy and unconditional love. That have nothing to do with what happens in a day to day basis.

  • I just fell out of my chair reading that. Is everything else just a distraction from our own mortality? (Sorry to bring it up.)

  • I disagree with the title of this article - I think most people DO want to be happy, but as detailed, happiness is a temporary feeling. Short-term feelings of happiness do not replace prolonged feelings of satisfaction. You will find it difficult to feel “satisfied” if you only chase moments happiness

    I disagree with the title of this article - I think most people DO want to be happy, but as detailed, happiness is a temporary feeling. Short-term feelings of happiness do not replace prolonged feelings of satisfaction. You will find it difficult to feel “satisfied” if you only chase moments happiness - you must live a life of purpose and drive towards goals that align to your deepest desires. But don’t forget to have some fun along the way!

  • My happiness is not the things of this world. My happiness lies with the Lord. I strive everyday to be what he wants me to be. I know it’s not the popular line of thinking, but it’s the line I want to be on. Eternity is my goal and that’s what I am working for, striving for

  • This is not a major finding. Everyone wants to be content in life.

  • This makes a lot of sense to me, while I enjoy hanging with friends, grabbing a drink, and socializing that isn’t fulfilling and isn’t as high a priority. Thus anytime something that will make me happy comes in conflict with something that satisfies me I choose satisfaction. For example staying out an

    This makes a lot of sense to me, while I enjoy hanging with friends, grabbing a drink, and socializing that isn’t fulfilling and isn’t as high a priority. Thus anytime something that will make me happy comes in conflict with something that satisfies me I choose satisfaction. For example staying out an hour later and risking my job, which affords me the ability to go out, or drinking a bunch or pop vs running. My goal is fitness even though the pop would be good in the immediate it would conflict with long term goals of fitness.

  • Quite insightful.

    “Satisfaction is retrospective. Happiness happens in real-time.”

  • Happiness is real time while satisfaction is over time. Got it!