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Six Years With a Distraction-Free iPhone

By Medium

If your phone gets in the way of whoever and whatever is important to you, don’t accept the compromise. Take matters into your own hands and design the phone you wantRead full story

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  • Beth Comstock
    Beth Comstock proAuthor

    No. I couldn’t get rid of apps cold turkey. But he makes a good point about not being beholden to others’ priorities. Fewer distractions yes, but let’s be realistic.

  • One man’s experience with removing the apps from his phone. I am not ready for this, but I admire it.

  • Could you actually do what's being suggested? Were addicted ... so I'm not sure despite the fact that a part of me believes the quality of my life would improve.

  • Ruchira Ranaweera, PhD
    Ruchira Ranaweera, PhDMSL

    About 6 months ago, I started by turning off notifications on my Facebook app, then worked my way up to deleting the app. Initially, I kept picking up and unlocking my phone only to realize I had no reason to do it. My organizational skills and priorities for work and home projects have definitely gotten better! It’s a strange kind of relief not being distracted by the Facebook newsfeed. On the other hand, I’m much more out of the loop on activities and events my friends and family post about.

    Instead

    About 6 months ago, I started by turning off notifications on my Facebook app, then worked my way up to deleting the app. Initially, I kept picking up and unlocking my phone only to realize I had no reason to do it. My organizational skills and priorities for work and home projects have definitely gotten better! It’s a strange kind of relief not being distracted by the Facebook newsfeed. On the other hand, I’m much more out of the loop on activities and events my friends and family post about.

    Instead, I like to catch up on their lives over a phone call here and there and then we can share photos via text or google photos.

  • Had a boss way back when that described task switching as thrashing. Sure enough, he was right: “Research says it takes an average of 23 minutes to get back on task after an interruption — that number sounds crazy, but experience tells me it’s about right”

  • William Wood
    William WoodOwner at William Wood

    Hey, let’s grow up. If you are taken over by apps on you smart phone, you lack discipline, focus and maturity. The phone is a tool, you make it a controlling influence.

  • I love my iPhone. And, yes, sometimes I despair at the intrusiveness *I allow* it to bring into my life, and the exposure to social media and the dark side of human nature.

    BUT for people who have family and friends living thousands of miles away, smartphones allow you to video chat at the drop of a hat.

    And, for that reason alone, they sort of rock.

  • Distractions zap our brain power and drain motivation. The less we can rely on our phones, the more brain power we have in the moment (he says as he posts a news article from his phone). It's a struggle.

  • On consciousness, family, and your phone’s role.

  • Jorge Guzman
    Jorge Guzman

    I delete everything. Only survival apps. My iPhone looks like a iPhone 2. Lol. Is a great breath. Keep everything in one screen. Important apps only, try it. You may have cravings keep going for a least a month.

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