Skip to navigationSkip to content

You aren’t imagining it—every brand logo looks the same now

By Quartz

Logos used to be distinctive. Historically, brands wanted to stand out with unique stylish scripts that signaled they were different. Not so anymore. In 2019,Read full story

Comments

  • Also share to
  • Ephrat Livni
    Ephrat LivniSenior Reporter at Quartz

    There are reasons that Burberry and Balenciaga and lots of other high-end fashion brands are making minimalist logos that are practically indistinguishable. But branding's "blanding" probably won't last forever.

  • I think it’s increasingly clear a brand is more “how does it make you feel, how can you express yourself with their product” rather than “does the logo evoke the brand” — hence simplification. What I don’t get is why logos have to be so similar — there are plenty of ways to simplify yet show your brand history.

    Although a young brand, I loge the evolution of Chobani’s brand. It takes risks, but captures both its product, audience and scrappy hipster roots really well. It also happens to be a tasty

    I think it’s increasingly clear a brand is more “how does it make you feel, how can you express yourself with their product” rather than “does the logo evoke the brand” — hence simplification. What I don’t get is why logos have to be so similar — there are plenty of ways to simplify yet show your brand history.

    Although a young brand, I loge the evolution of Chobani’s brand. It takes risks, but captures both its product, audience and scrappy hipster roots really well. It also happens to be a tasty product.

    Another one is Mailchimp. It’s simplified, but their custom typeface and (weird) artwork makes them stand out, for better or worse.

    Dropbox took a risk, which I appreciate. I just... don’t understand why they went the direction they chose. As a long time Dropbox user I really don’t want “cool” — make me feel you won’t lose my files. You’re not that edgy design hipster.

  • The trend of simplification in logo design is reasonable (and I'm as much of a sucker for minimalist aesthetics as the next millennial) but I do think it has gone too far. The Burberry design is a good example: simplifying their complex logo is a perfectly smart move, but turning your logo into what may as well be the MS Word default font? Probably an overcorrection.

    It's important that brands don't, in the rush toward modernity, lose their actual identity. That's a surefire way to drive off longtime

    The trend of simplification in logo design is reasonable (and I'm as much of a sucker for minimalist aesthetics as the next millennial) but I do think it has gone too far. The Burberry design is a good example: simplifying their complex logo is a perfectly smart move, but turning your logo into what may as well be the MS Word default font? Probably an overcorrection.

    It's important that brands don't, in the rush toward modernity, lose their actual identity. That's a surefire way to drive off longtime customers who are attracted to that identity. Go for simpler fonts and cleaner emblems, sure, but you don't want to look the same as your competitors; that doesn't help anybody.

Want more conversations like this?

Join the Quartz community for all the intelligence, without the noise.

App Store BadgeGoogle Play Badge
Leaderboard Screenshot

A community of leaders, subject matter experts, and curious minds bringing nuance back to how we talk about the news.

Editors' Picks Screenshot

No content overload: our editors will curate the most notable and discussion-worthy pieces for you every day.

Share Screenshot

Don’t just read the story, tell it: contribute your ideas and experience to the dialogue.