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Snapchat founder Evan Spiegel and wife Miranda Kerr only allow their seven-year-old child to have 1.5 hours of screen time per week

By Tech Insider

In a recent interview with the Financial Times, Snap CEO Evan Spiegel said that he wasn't allowed to watch TV while growing up. Spiegel explained that he "actually thought that was valuable becauseRead full story

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  • Israel  Idonije
    Israel Idonije proATHLITACOMICS

    In October, the NYT had an interesting 3-part story about how parents in Silicon Valley don’t want phones (screens) anywhere near their own children. A thought-provoking read about how those who have developed phones, apps, games, etc. really feel about their products.

  • Kyle King
    Kyle King

    Irony. Build an app with the aim of keeping people on their phone as a core component of the business model. Then limit your own kids screen time.

    Maybe there should be a type of litmus test for Silicon Valley. Test the products on your family first and then the public. If you wouldn’t test it on your family then that tells you something.

  • Yusuke Umeda
    Yusuke UmedaFounder and CEO at Uzabase

    I found an interesting tweet from @garrytan.

    Bad things for kids:

    2018—Fortnite

    1907— dimestore novels

    1800’s— chess (yes literally people said the same thing about chess)

    https://twitter.com/garrytan/status/1076627918334251008?s=21

    Nobody knows the right answer. Btw I discussed with my kids (9, 5 and 2 year old) and made a rule together to use the screens(including tv) 2hours/day. I believe, the process to make rules by themselves is more important for kids.

    And also here is an interesting story

    I found an interesting tweet from @garrytan.

    Bad things for kids:

    2018—Fortnite

    1907— dimestore novels

    1800’s— chess (yes literally people said the same thing about chess)

    https://twitter.com/garrytan/status/1076627918334251008?s=21

    Nobody knows the right answer. Btw I discussed with my kids (9, 5 and 2 year old) and made a rule together to use the screens(including tv) 2hours/day. I believe, the process to make rules by themselves is more important for kids.

    And also here is an interesting story @Israel is mentioning.

    A Dark Consensus About Screens and Kids Begins to Emerge in Silicon Valley

    “I am convinced the devil lives in our phones.”

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/26/style/phones-children-silicon-valley.html

  • There is something going on. I don't understand why people are preventing their children from using phones, laptops, tablets, and whatsoever. Do we really think we are going back to the stone age era? Do we really think these devices will become less useful in the future? Are we really envisioning a future where phones, tablets, and yet-to-be-produced ones are not used as much?

    I wish we could all wake up from such dreams. In the next 20 years, phones, tablets, laptops, and screen-based devices

    There is something going on. I don't understand why people are preventing their children from using phones, laptops, tablets, and whatsoever. Do we really think we are going back to the stone age era? Do we really think these devices will become less useful in the future? Are we really envisioning a future where phones, tablets, and yet-to-be-produced ones are not used as much?

    I wish we could all wake up from such dreams. In the next 20 years, phones, tablets, laptops, and screen-based devices will take over. Remember remote work and freelancing is increasing so fast, the future of work is changing, AI is growing, AR and VR are all winning. The earlier we start teaching our kids how to use today and tomorrow's devices responsibly, the better.

    Preventing them from using these devices won't stop the disruptive tech innovations. So if we don't want them to be aliens in their own environments, we better find a solution, because less screen time isn't the solution. Our children will have more screen time than us, and their children will even go higher.

    Let's wake up. Devices aren't going anywhere.

  • Naveen Jain
    Naveen JainproFounder & CEO at Viome

    I hope Even realizes that kids do what they see and not what they are told.

    “Of course, Spiegel may need to start practicing what he preaches, as the Snap CEO reportedly spends much of his time during board meetings glued to his phone and disengaged from conversation.”

  • These Editors picks are not worth the 3 seconds it takes to read the headline, or the 10 seconds it took to write this comment.

  • John Battelle
    John BattelleproFounder at NewCo

    I hesitated before picking this story, because I hate the way Insider rewrites other people's work. In this case a Financial Times article... But I guess the FT's pay wall is the reason editors at Quartz decided to pick it. Makes me feel a little bit dirty, but anyways to the point.... This is another example of the utter tone deafness inherent to the CEOs of addictive technology applications. My daughter's friends spend somewhere between 2 to 10 hours a day on Snapchat and Instagram. We limit our

    I hesitated before picking this story, because I hate the way Insider rewrites other people's work. In this case a Financial Times article... But I guess the FT's pay wall is the reason editors at Quartz decided to pick it. Makes me feel a little bit dirty, but anyways to the point.... This is another example of the utter tone deafness inherent to the CEOs of addictive technology applications. My daughter's friends spend somewhere between 2 to 10 hours a day on Snapchat and Instagram. We limit our daughter's time assiduously, much to her embarrassment, but the truth is not many parents actually do. Spiegel's business model depends on that fact.

  • James Cakmak
    James CakmakEntrepreneur | Tech Analyst

    Not surprised at another headline like this. The hypocrisy is so increasingly prevalent it’s difficult to even interpret anymore.

    In more important news I just cut the cord. It’s liberating, try it.

  • PETERSON TEIXEIRA
    PETERSON TEIXEIRACEO at Peterson Teixeira Company

    He is right though:

    “Spiegel explained that he "actually thought that was valuable because [he] spent a lot of time just building stuff and reading or whatever."

    You do get much more value and personal growth from reading lessons of a lifetime (books) from high-level people. We also tend to consume much more content while we do nothing remarkable with our lives, considering articles and quick videos as the go-to resource.

    Plus, If you want to impact the world you need to shut yourself down to

    He is right though:

    “Spiegel explained that he "actually thought that was valuable because [he] spent a lot of time just building stuff and reading or whatever."

    You do get much more value and personal growth from reading lessons of a lifetime (books) from high-level people. We also tend to consume much more content while we do nothing remarkable with our lives, considering articles and quick videos as the go-to resource.

    Plus, If you want to impact the world you need to shut yourself down to the world for a long period of time, in order to build what you want.

    Also, there are skills that make a major difference in today’s world that people are unlearning, like socializing OFFLINE with others. And social skills are a HUGE part of winning in life, like Dating, Networking, making New Friends etc.

    Devices are just tools. Learn what they do, but use them. Don’t let them use you and steal your life.

    PETERSON TEIXEIRA COMPANY

    International Consulting & Coaching

    www.petersonteixeira.com

  • Never get high on your own supply...

  • For a generation we have assumed that early exposure to technology was important to the child development. We also assumed that playing on an electronic device was safer than playing outside. Unfortunately, both assumptions were wrong. The American Association of Pediatrics recommends no screen time under the age of three and a minimum of exposure thereafter. Exposure can rise in the teenage years, but the risks remain high, as the mediation of relationships by tech can really mess up kids.

    Smart

    For a generation we have assumed that early exposure to technology was important to the child development. We also assumed that playing on an electronic device was safer than playing outside. Unfortunately, both assumptions were wrong. The American Association of Pediatrics recommends no screen time under the age of three and a minimum of exposure thereafter. Exposure can rise in the teenage years, but the risks remain high, as the mediation of relationships by tech can really mess up kids.

    Smart Silicon Valley executives know this, but may prefer that their customers not know it.

  • Do we really think that an hour and a half a day for a seven year old is too little?

  • Great PR but I suspect the nanny who is raising their child allows more than 1.5 hours.

  • Screen time can be of the addicting kind (mindlessly snapping, IGing or scrolling through FB) or of the valuable (the learning, building, experimenting) kind.

    The former kind of screen time kills curiosity and motivation. It’s an antidote to boredom... but boredom is the driver to exploring the world around us and just mess with stuff.

    Screen time is not the equivalent of comic books and morning tv cartoons when we were kids, because they weren’t an infinite scrolling wall of content. Either

    Screen time can be of the addicting kind (mindlessly snapping, IGing or scrolling through FB) or of the valuable (the learning, building, experimenting) kind.

    The former kind of screen time kills curiosity and motivation. It’s an antidote to boredom... but boredom is the driver to exploring the world around us and just mess with stuff.

    Screen time is not the equivalent of comic books and morning tv cartoons when we were kids, because they weren’t an infinite scrolling wall of content. Either our kids will be mindless screen zombies (not unlike certain demographics of adults today) or they will have amazing abilities at self control.

  • It's one thing to teach kids devices = tools to expand what you do and enable more creative endeavors from devices = things you use because you are bored.

    The problem is not necessarily the device but the level of parental involvement not just in how much but in how the device is used...

  • Tells you everything you need to know. Kids are on tablets and smartphones as young as three.

  • William Wood
    William WoodOwner at William Wood

    Seems appropriate to me!

  • Dr Gail Barnes
    Dr Gail BarnesPartner at Personify LLC

    Too much of anything is not a good thing. The same goes for social media.

  • Aleksandr Strizhevskiy
    Aleksandr Strizhevskiy

    I don't see the irony or contradiction here, but the article wants to make it seem like there is. An adult can drink coffee but it's not recommended for children. An adult might enjoy violent films but not with their children. Too much screen time is certainly damaging for a developing mind. But that doesn't mean using your phone is inherently problematic. I'm sure vodka distillers don't let their infants drink their products.

  • Máryland Monroé
    Máryland Monroé

    Wow but flood the social environment with SnapChat..

  • Mario Alvarez
    Mario Alvarez

    We ALL need to cut down our Screen Time!

  • John Vonk
    John Vonk

    Hi

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