Skip to navigationSkip to content

How Millennials Became The Burnout Generation

By BuzzFeed News

I couldn’t figure out why small, straightforward tasks on my to-do list felt so impossible. The answer is both more complex and far simpler than I expectedRead full story

Comments

  • Also share to
  • As the host of a podcast literally called “Financial Grownup” I can’t say enough good things about this well researched and written piece. So many gems but in a nutshell- many of our youngest adults (millennials are 22 to 38 years old) are working all the time because few jobs are truly 9-5 where you can be “off’- and without the downtime, even mundane errands and tasks weigh heavily. Technology has kept them on the clock around the clock, and as the piece points out, social media has become part

    As the host of a podcast literally called “Financial Grownup” I can’t say enough good things about this well researched and written piece. So many gems but in a nutshell- many of our youngest adults (millennials are 22 to 38 years old) are working all the time because few jobs are truly 9-5 where you can be “off’- and without the downtime, even mundane errands and tasks weigh heavily. Technology has kept them on the clock around the clock, and as the piece points out, social media has become part of their job for so many- building their personal brands even if they aren’t officially ‘influencers’ because it still ties to their careers. It IS exhausting to keep up with it all. My hope is that there will be a movement- ironically likely led by influencers- to be offline a bit more.

    And the fact is, as millennials move through the grownup phases of their lives (maybe marriage, maybe kids, maybe buying homes) they will be FORCED to deal with the errands etc that do matter- because others will depend on them. The personal consequence for not voting .. is feeling like you should have. The consequence of not getting your kid into daycare because you didn’t motivate to out the form? Exactly.

  • Read a book, get a good night's sleep, go to the gym, and get back to work.

    If you have a job that comes with a computer, your life's not that hard.

  • There’s a principle in User Experience Design: never blame people, always blame design.

    If people aren’t voting that’s a design problem.

    If people aren’t responding to emails that’s a design problem.

    Adult things like writing checks, registering to vote, and responding to emails feels painful because the design is terrible. Older generations see this lazy discontent as a sign of a lack of character, which is a judgmental and sad outlook. Instead, fix the design.

  • Max Lockie
    Max LockiePlatform Editor at Quartz

    "Why am I burned out? Because I’ve internalized the idea that I should be working all the time."

    "Our capacity to burn out and keep working is our greatest value."

    As an older millennial I'm starting to see peers who are not just temporarily burning out, but just losing the thread altogether. Not really sure what to do with this information. The answer seems just to be that burning out is ok and if you want to re-orient your life away from career achievements that's fine. kind of bland. but it's

    "Why am I burned out? Because I’ve internalized the idea that I should be working all the time."

    "Our capacity to burn out and keep working is our greatest value."

    As an older millennial I'm starting to see peers who are not just temporarily burning out, but just losing the thread altogether. Not really sure what to do with this information. The answer seems just to be that burning out is ok and if you want to re-orient your life away from career achievements that's fine. kind of bland. but it's a nice read. the answer is probably to have kids and stop being such a narcissist.

  • PETERSON TEIXEIRA
    PETERSON TEIXEIRACEO at Peterson Teixeira Company

    The article itself gives the real reason for the “millennials drama”, which it briefly mentions below:

    “Explanations like Tim’s are at the core of the millennial reputation: We’re spoiled, entitled, lazy, and failures at what’s come to be known as “adulting,” a word invented by millennials as a catchall for the tasks of self-sufficient existence. “

    The actual reason why millennials have been facing a very hard life, is due to the previous economic crisis (2008), blocking most millennials from achieving

    The article itself gives the real reason for the “millennials drama”, which it briefly mentions below:

    “Explanations like Tim’s are at the core of the millennial reputation: We’re spoiled, entitled, lazy, and failures at what’s come to be known as “adulting,” a word invented by millennials as a catchall for the tasks of self-sufficient existence. “

    The actual reason why millennials have been facing a very hard life, is due to the previous economic crisis (2008), blocking most millennials from achieving adulthood milestones such as buying a house, getting married (which demands money to support yourself and your family), buying a car etc.

    The article explains below why:

    “As with previous generations, there was an expectation that the next one would be better off — both in terms of health and finances — than the one that had come before. But as millennials enter into mid-adulthood, that prognosis has been proven false. Financially speaking, most of us lag far behind where our parents were when they were our age. We have far less saved, far less equity, far less stability, and far, far more student debt. The “greatest generation” had the Depression and the GI Bill; boomers had the golden age of capitalism; Gen-X had deregulation and trickle-down economics. And millennials? We’ve got venture capital, but we’ve also got the 2008 financial crisis, the decline of the middle class and the rise of the 1%, and the steady decay of unions and stable, full-time employment.”

    That’s why a lot of what millennials do result in no progress in life. Humans are based on progress. If someone gave you $1 million to write a 2000-word article somewhere, you would do it, because the reward is worth it.

    The problem is that many things that millennials do is not worth it. Doesn’t give them progress.

    College? Scam. And you’ll leave with tons of debt afterwards.

    Jobs? Are just to survive. You can’t buy a home or a car or save money to invest etc.

    And the list goes on. So millennials feel burnout because all their effort seems worthless. When they face tasks now, they project the pain instead of the reward, hence why the burnout.

    Here’s a VERY GOOD Huffpost article written by a TEAM of people that talks about this subject:

    “I am 35 years old - the oldest millennial, the first millennial - and for a decade now, I’ve been waiting for adulthood to kick in. My rent consumes nearly HALF my income, I haven’t had a steady job since Pluto was a planet and my savings are dwindling faster than the ice caps the baby boomers melted.

    HUFFPOST - Why Millennials are facing the scariest financial future of any generation since The Great Depression - http://bit.ly/2xCXaLy

    This is also the cause for why they seem spoiled. Because many still live with their parents, because they have no money to support themselves, which may result in their parents sometimes doing chores for them, making them spoiled.

    However, the real cause for all this is the lack of economic progress. Financial progress. That’s the truth. Yet, we see retarded analysis and people blaming a whole generation without understanding the root cause for it.

    PETERSON TEIXEIRA COMPANY

    International Consulting & Coaching

    www.petersonteixeira.com

  • Ephrat Livni
    Ephrat LivniSenior Reporter at Quartz

    The conclusion here is sound but to get there you’ll have to slog through a lot of generalizations that ignore reality for other generations. The notion of millennial burnout seems like another way to make life into a disease we can diagnose. All in all this was a lot of words to basically prove that millennials, or at least the writer, don’t get the pressures all people feel and believe they are somehow special, which is of course so millennial.

  • Sara  Wynn
    Sara WynnStudent at Murray State University

    Anyone with a snarky critique of this author’s very real analysis of the millennial condition must be living the good life.

    As a millennial nearing the end of my college career, I look forward to hopefully finding a job just so I can have a Monday-Friday workweek. There are weeks when I have to get out every single day. Not one day a week can I just sleep in, have a quiet day to myself to regain sanity. There is never a point when I reach the end of my to-do list and I don’t have something sitting

    Anyone with a snarky critique of this author’s very real analysis of the millennial condition must be living the good life.

    As a millennial nearing the end of my college career, I look forward to hopefully finding a job just so I can have a Monday-Friday workweek. There are weeks when I have to get out every single day. Not one day a week can I just sleep in, have a quiet day to myself to regain sanity. There is never a point when I reach the end of my to-do list and I don’t have something sitting on my conscious- a paper to research, a night shift to work, music to practice, bills I know I can’t pay no matter how many shifts I pick up. In the busiest two years of my college career, my day would go 8 am to 11 pm, when I would have to come home and do homework, shower, get a few hours of sleep, and do it all over again. Classes, first job, fraternity meetings, church, rehearsals, second job, practice, homework- and even with all that work, I still couldn’t make ends meet. And, after all that, if I’m being honest, it felt as if I shouldn’t be going to sleep when I did. My day could last 18 hours and I would feel on most days that I needed two of me and more hours in a day to get things done. I cannot imagine having a child or a husband to tend to while trying to complete everything I am expected to now. Burn out? Read a book, exercise, sleep, you’ll be fine. Yeah, except when? With what time? With what energy? Get outta here.

    So yes. My generation is burnt out, and I would argue more than any other generation has had to experience. The challenges we face are new and so are the expectations.

    If you have a job that is M-F, can make ends meet and then have extra money to run around on, have an actual weekend where you can recharge, have healthcare, a car, don’t have anyone to take care of besides yourself- congratulations. It was so much easier for other generations to get where you are. You got into the system before inflation and social and academic expectations skyrocketed, hindering the rest of us. Good for you. You were lucky. Don’t be so condescending.

    “Never look down on anybody unless you’re helping them up.”

  • This article about the “burnout generation” reads like it’s burned out. I’m sorry millennials, you don’t get to own being burned out.

    This concept is not a generational indicator, it’s a cultural one. Americans of every generation since the 1950’s have felt this sense of morally bankrupt, directionless burden of success, or the achievement of it (See Marvelous Mrs. Maisel). It’s the result of a lack of moral, ethical purpose in what we do.

    As Capra points out in “The Turning Point”, with the

    This article about the “burnout generation” reads like it’s burned out. I’m sorry millennials, you don’t get to own being burned out.

    This concept is not a generational indicator, it’s a cultural one. Americans of every generation since the 1950’s have felt this sense of morally bankrupt, directionless burden of success, or the achievement of it (See Marvelous Mrs. Maisel). It’s the result of a lack of moral, ethical purpose in what we do.

    As Capra points out in “The Turning Point”, with the advent of a objective and capitalist attitude towards education, out went ethical sensibilities, values, quality, form and aesthetics. Defending yoga pants in public for example.

    In comes hyper efficiency and production of the all might dollar. When our attitude becomes all about working and achievements, we close off that natural part of ourselves that is suppose to “experience” the world.

    As humans, we’re not suppose to be working constantly, we’re suppose to be learning, connecting and creating. We are supposed to be experiencing the outside world and learning to become a part of it. Instead we have been taught to separate ourselves from our environment and our income becomes the only indicator of our success in life. This is the great fallacy.

    So we spend what little disposable income we have on obtaining those “experiences” and finding those connections, yet we still feel empty inside. That IPhone upgrade isn’t cutting it anymore.

    We as a society have to slow down and start to think about the reasons behind our actions. We have to stop doing things for the sake of doing them. We have to “think” and understand the underlying reasons why we do the things we do.

    We can meditate, do yoga, work our collective asses off till the cows come home, but we’ll never be “satisfied” or feel whole again until we can understand why we are doing the things we do.

    ADHD isn’t a disease, it’s our bodies telling us something is wrong with our environment in which we find ourselves. We have to listen to ourselves, trust ourselves, forgive ourselves for not being perfect.

    Becoming an adult, isn’t making up ridiculous words like “adulting”. It’s about learning to be able to think for ourselves, overcoming our fears and understanding our place in the world.

    We must be able to define ourselves without concepts like “job” “city” “neighborhood” or what hot spot we had dinner at the other night.

    It’s not an event with a specific date like a graduation. It’s a process riddled with mistakes, pain and suffering. We have to work at it every day and every moment... overcome all the excuses we come up with. It’s no one else’s fault but ours. That’s the challenge we all face, not as millennials or some age group, but as Americans and larger members of modern day society as a whole.

  • Edward Dowling
    Edward DowlingProduct Manager

    It’s the difference between happiness and satisfaction. Older generations are very good at achieving and optimising for satisfaction. Millennials optimise for continual happiness. That means we don’t do things that merely satisfy us, we can only be bothered with things which make us happy and actually add value. The mundane does not make us happy.

  • Kartik Chaturvedi
    Kartik ChaturvediSoftware Developer

    The constant race to stay ahead – not necessarily ahead of others, but rather of ourselves – is driven mainly by the desire to improve and achieve something greater than mere satisfaction with life. Us millennials want to achieve long lasting happiness, not just for ourselves, but for the greater good. By design, society’s status quos are not supposed to be constantly challenged this way, and as a result, lead us to constantly work a lot harder, just to accomplish a little more.

  • John Poveromo
    John PoveromoComedian

    My favorite things in some of these threads is when a CEO tells someone who has to struggle to survive to essentially “buck up” life’s not that hard while they delegate every aspect of their lives and rake in money. Always give me a decent laugh.

  • Jacob deHahn
    Jacob deHahnfreelance brand designer

    So many comments here with varying, some valid, opinions and claims. As the youngest millennial (1996), it's interesting to see those older than I commenting on this with a negative outlook and warped perspective.

    We're all different. Some may attack the writer because of her "petulant whining," others may empathize — but it truly depends on your experiences. For me, I relate heavily to my generations need to "win" — I see it every day at my part time job and academics. I see it in myself. Whether

    So many comments here with varying, some valid, opinions and claims. As the youngest millennial (1996), it's interesting to see those older than I commenting on this with a negative outlook and warped perspective.

    We're all different. Some may attack the writer because of her "petulant whining," others may empathize — but it truly depends on your experiences. For me, I relate heavily to my generations need to "win" — I see it every day at my part time job and academics. I see it in myself. Whether it's a positive driver or a weakness, I'll discover it as I age. Until then, of course I will strive to see that there's more to life than work, work, and work. But it's hard with inflated living costs/bills, crippling academic debt, and the fear of "will I get a job when I graduate?" because Independence and security is tough these days.

    Also: I CLAPPED when you, @Spencer Camp, mentioned design should be the blame, not people. I learn this in my studies too. Thank you, thank you.

  • There are those trapped in the game or the narrative — those who pursue goals, careers, and lifestyle advertised to them by others, like parents, the educational system, friends or social media — and there are those who completely ignore this mainstream or “common” sense and pave their own ways.

    Most people who do the former feel stuck. They’ve played the game and now ya time for a reward. But the game is built for players to keep playing — there isn’t a reward at the end. Most career tracks are

    There are those trapped in the game or the narrative — those who pursue goals, careers, and lifestyle advertised to them by others, like parents, the educational system, friends or social media — and there are those who completely ignore this mainstream or “common” sense and pave their own ways.

    Most people who do the former feel stuck. They’ve played the game and now ya time for a reward. But the game is built for players to keep playing — there isn’t a reward at the end. Most career tracks are DESIGNED to be endless, like loot boxes or character leveling, from game design. They’re supposed to be a never ending World of Warcraft where you always chase something else. It keeps people actively participating and shutting up.

    Don’t play the game. Don’t fall into that trap. Go read, think, travel if you can afford it. Look at how others live. You can choose to come back, or you can choose another life.

  • I don’t know where to start to respond to this article - it’s too hard, so I just won’t.

  • Noah Pisner
    Noah PisnerSenior Editor, Branded at Quartz

    "You don’t fix burnout by going on vacation. You don’t fix it through “life hacks,” like inbox zero, or by using a meditation app for five minutes in the morning, or doing Sunday meal prep for the entire family, or starting a bullet journal. You don’t fix it by reading a book on how to “unfu*k yourself.” You don’t fix it with vacation, or an adult coloring book, or “anxiety baking,” or the Pomodoro Technique, or overnight fucking oats."

    What Peterson shows is a confluence of 2 phenomenon: Millennials

    "You don’t fix burnout by going on vacation. You don’t fix it through “life hacks,” like inbox zero, or by using a meditation app for five minutes in the morning, or doing Sunday meal prep for the entire family, or starting a bullet journal. You don’t fix it by reading a book on how to “unfu*k yourself.” You don’t fix it with vacation, or an adult coloring book, or “anxiety baking,” or the Pomodoro Technique, or overnight fucking oats."

    What Peterson shows is a confluence of 2 phenomenon: Millennials face extremely unfavorable circumstances relative to past generations, but we've also been raised with a skewed perception of reality and expectations. The combination is disastrous, and the solution will require addressing both: a policy-led economic revamp AND a lot of therapy to help mitigate our false perceptions

  • Katherine Ellen Foley
    Katherine Ellen Foleyhealth/science reporter at Quartz

    The comments on this piece has been almost as fascinating as the piece itself. I honestly don't know what to think about being a part of this generation—a lot of this resonated with me, but I also wonder if it's a product of choosing to live in a city surrounded by people who are endlessly motivated. However, as many have acknowledged, I'm not totally sure older generations missed these pressures, or felt them differently. I do think that there's a certain toxicity to technology that keeps us working

    The comments on this piece has been almost as fascinating as the piece itself. I honestly don't know what to think about being a part of this generation—a lot of this resonated with me, but I also wonder if it's a product of choosing to live in a city surrounded by people who are endlessly motivated. However, as many have acknowledged, I'm not totally sure older generations missed these pressures, or felt them differently. I do think that there's a certain toxicity to technology that keeps us working and alert and selling our personalities constantly. But without it, we'd miss out on the connections to others that would be otherwise impossible.

    I guess being a human has always been hard? But for us millennials, it's harder in ways that haven't been experienced before. For the generation below us, it'll look completely different again.

  • Dave Edwards
    Dave EdwardsFounder at Sonder Scheme

    I hope this author is an anomaly and not representative of her generation. The oh-woah-are-we attitude simply reinforces the stereotype that millennials think they’re special and life is so much harder for them. The author goes so far as to suggest that we should classify millennial hardships as a chronic disease.

    Here’s a tip: life is not as uniquely challenging for you as you think it is.

    Bothered by being called the lazy generation? Gen Xers were so maligned as slackers Hollywood made movies

    I hope this author is an anomaly and not representative of her generation. The oh-woah-are-we attitude simply reinforces the stereotype that millennials think they’re special and life is so much harder for them. The author goes so far as to suggest that we should classify millennial hardships as a chronic disease.

    Here’s a tip: life is not as uniquely challenging for you as you think it is.

    Bothered by being called the lazy generation? Gen Xers were so maligned as slackers Hollywood made movies about us.

    Think your life is overwhelming because you’re always online? Everyone with a smartphone feels that way. It’s called life in the mobile age, not the millennial condition.

    Think the GFC hit you hard? Try recovering from a financial disaster when you are 10-20 years closer to retirement. Many Gen Xers were hit in the prime earning years of their lives...with little time left before retirement.

    Think it’s hard to buy a house? Try being a Boomer buying a house in the 80s when 30 year mortgage rates were consistently above 10% and peaked at 19%.

    The big difference between the generations is that millennials seem to think there’s something so special and so difficult about their lives that we should classify it as a chronic disease. The rest of us realize that life is sometimes great and sometimes really rough. The little things on your task lists are just that—little things—and have no bearing on the really big things in life. Get ‘em done and get on to the important people and things. As the old poem goes: Today well-lived makes every yesterday a dream of happiness and every tomorrow a vision of hope.

  • “ If anything, our commitment to work, no matter how exploitative, has simply encouraged and facilitated our exploitation” 🛎🛎🛎

  • Perspective : How about spending some time in the so-called "third world" to see if millenials out there have the same burn out?

    I'm pretty sure they'd be willing to trade places in a heartbeat...

  • Indrani Sen
    Indrani SenCulture and lifestyle editor at Quartz

    This resonated hugely for me, despite not being a millennial.

  • Sumeet Shah
    Sumeet ShahBacking brands at Swiftarc Ventures

    Many, many people will continue to blame millennials for their laziness and entitlement. But like any generation, when you peel back the various direct and indirect economic circumstances and events surrounding their upbringings, you get a more somber and scary argument around how much millennials are struggling in this current cycle.

    "To describe millennial burnout accurately is to acknowledge the multiplicity of our lived reality — that we’re not just high school graduates, or parents, or knowledge

    Many, many people will continue to blame millennials for their laziness and entitlement. But like any generation, when you peel back the various direct and indirect economic circumstances and events surrounding their upbringings, you get a more somber and scary argument around how much millennials are struggling in this current cycle.

    "To describe millennial burnout accurately is to acknowledge the multiplicity of our lived reality — that we’re not just high school graduates, or parents, or knowledge workers, but all of the above — while recognizing our status quo. We’re deeply in debt, working more hours and more jobs for less pay and less security, struggling to achieve the same standards of living as our parents, operating in psychological and physical precariousness, all while being told that if we just work harder, meritocracy will prevail, and we’ll begin thriving. The carrot dangling in front of us is the dream that the to-do list will end, or at least become far more manageable."

  • Jen Hul
    Jen Hul

    Irrational and/or unrealistic expectations are always the root of these woes. So fix the root.

  • Edmund Davison
    Edmund DavisonConsultant at Dmg media

    Used to find it impossible when, on the rare occasion I was not working late, to go home and do ‘nothing.’ Always felt I should in that instance be socialising, job hunting, exercising or any other sense of ‘achieving.’ Learning now that ability to do nothing happily is symptomatic of good mental health moment

  • Dana Filek-Gibson
    Dana Filek-GibsonFreelance writer and editor

    "Why can’t I get this mundane stuff done? Because I’m burned out. Why am I burned out? Because I’ve internalized the idea that I should be working all the time. Why have I internalized that idea? Because everything and everyone in my life has reinforced it — explicitly and implicitly — since I was young."

    I, too, have a couple bullet points on the to-do list that are continually rolled over to the next day and the next...and the next. This read resonates.

  • Patrick deHahn
    Patrick deHahnNews curator at Quartz

    It's funny how I first saw this piece minutes after my two best friends and I all warned each other to not get burned out in our group chat, because we were each doing after-hours and weekend work. And also I have so much mail I've left unopened over the last week.

    This is such a strong piece -- there's many points I can relate to as a 27-year-old Millennial. I recall the first hints of the work-all-the-time lifestyle even as early as middle or high school. We had extra curricular activities where

    It's funny how I first saw this piece minutes after my two best friends and I all warned each other to not get burned out in our group chat, because we were each doing after-hours and weekend work. And also I have so much mail I've left unopened over the last week.

    This is such a strong piece -- there's many points I can relate to as a 27-year-old Millennial. I recall the first hints of the work-all-the-time lifestyle even as early as middle or high school. We had extra curricular activities where we were on campus as late as 11 o'clock at night.

    And the college application process is very similar to the job search post-grad the writer describes. Following that was the stress of choosing your major, the right one at that. And then the competition of getting an internship (and a job). I once pulled off a semester of commuting between two college campuses for classes, managing a dorm floor as a RA, working an internship, and fitting in an on-campus job. (Yet that wasn't "enough" as I know fellow classmates and RAs who pulled off six-eight internships through their college years.) And yes, life after school is a whole different ballgame, as the writer details.

    I can also especially relate to the "decision fatigue." I am known to be notoriously indecisive and perhaps this writer nailed that issue. (This "decision fatigue" is also perhaps a reason why I didn't like "Black Mirror: Bandersnatch")

    Lastly, I definitely relate to the sentiment of feeling like I'm not doing enough -- it's always the thought of I should be doing more work, reading more, watching the news, catching up on all the media we like to follow, updating social media, keeping in touch with people, investing in career growth, and so on. I don't see this as a terrible problem but it can be overwhelming -- and does sting when you're hard on yourself for, perhaps, having a fun night out or sleeping in one weekend morning. I'm definitely recommending this piece to many friends of similar ages.

    "Our capacity to burn out and keep working is our greatest value."

  • Michael Erisman
    Michael Erisman

    Great article, well written, and very clear. Also perhaps the most depressing thing I have read in a long time. The lack of self awareness that even the struggle to do every tasks because you don’t feel like it, is a privilege denied to billions, is really astounding. Not sure what the cure is, but it starts with some gratitude.

  • The struggle is real.

  • Amy Miller
    Amy MillerPresident at Miller Mediation and Solution

    As this article clearly states, if all we do is to take and not give back, we become a society of scarcity rather than abundance.

    Each of us were placed on this earth for a reason, we are meant to either use the resources provided to us or leave our world better than we received it. I challenge everyone to create something that helps others in your community. Not for personal gain, but to simply help others. Plant a seed, which is all that’s needed to create plenty.

  • Kyo Kaku
    Kyo KakuVice President at China-Japan J/V

    As part of millennials, I strongly sympathize with the “errands paralysis” with which I think I’m also affected... As long as the tasks are associated with my paid assignments, I hardly ever procrastinate and just get them done with a strong sense of responsibility, but when it comes down to mundane stuff, I’m just apt to put off until the last minutes and sometimes completely forget...

    But I don’t think this habit has anything to do with the anxiety I have nor with social context, and is peculiar

    As part of millennials, I strongly sympathize with the “errands paralysis” with which I think I’m also affected... As long as the tasks are associated with my paid assignments, I hardly ever procrastinate and just get them done with a strong sense of responsibility, but when it comes down to mundane stuff, I’m just apt to put off until the last minutes and sometimes completely forget...

    But I don’t think this habit has anything to do with the anxiety I have nor with social context, and is peculiar to our generation in the first place. People like me are simply damn lazy and know there is always somebody else doing those stuff.

  • What a bunch of whining. As a 26-year-old millennial, I have an amazing, hard-working wife who works full-time and a rad 4-year-old son who has a serious health condition. I myself work two jobs and am working to finish up my second college degree.

    Are finances tight? You bet your sweet a$$ they are. But that's because nice things are expensive. Go figure. My wife and I aren't even 30, and we're living a life I couldn't even of imagined, growing up in the East side with practically nothing.

    Life

    What a bunch of whining. As a 26-year-old millennial, I have an amazing, hard-working wife who works full-time and a rad 4-year-old son who has a serious health condition. I myself work two jobs and am working to finish up my second college degree.

    Are finances tight? You bet your sweet a$$ they are. But that's because nice things are expensive. Go figure. My wife and I aren't even 30, and we're living a life I couldn't even of imagined, growing up in the East side with practically nothing.

    Life is a gamble, always. And you either roll the dice or lose your turn.

  • Erin Rey
    Erin ReySchool Counselor

    TL;DR version, anyone??? So wordy. I can’t understand this author’s thesis statement.

  • Guru Boss
    Guru Boss

    Must read for millennials

  • Fred  Parsons
    Fred Parsons

    I in part agree. I’m just a old nurse who managed through life with out knowing I have Tourette’s Syndrome and that I have ADD. Neither of which was diagnosed until late life. Which brings me to the point is just it sure determination to succeed. Is it we started making everyone a winner and everyone gets a trophy. Like I said there are many variations on this. Tech over load that you don’t need to physical go and have actual face to face conversation with someone or parents just doing to much for

    I in part agree. I’m just a old nurse who managed through life with out knowing I have Tourette’s Syndrome and that I have ADD. Neither of which was diagnosed until late life. Which brings me to the point is just it sure determination to succeed. Is it we started making everyone a winner and everyone gets a trophy. Like I said there are many variations on this. Tech over load that you don’t need to physical go and have actual face to face conversation with someone or parents just doing to much for our children. I speak from some experience I have a 38 year old who can’t or has trouble relating to his four children. Just not sure

  • Jason Smedley
    Jason Smedley

    Read a book, get a good night's sleep, go to the gym, and get back to work.

    If you have a job that comes with a computer, your life's not that hard.

    - CEO XO Group

    Translation: Shut up and get back to work you poor trash!

  • Yuni Wakamatu
    Yuni Wakamatu

    Millennials are associated with "digital nature"in my window.The technology are doing what we used to do in our hand,which obviously changes our lifestyle and thinking habits.

    I think Millennials aren't lazy rather they seems easily distracted due to the hyperconnected enviroment,which generations above consider it as apathetic.

  • Skylar Canales
    Skylar Canales

    Peoples lives are too complicated now a days just let us work then retire.

  • Lorena  Morales
    Lorena Morales Marketing at First RevOps consultancy

    Read

  • Kyle Snage
    Kyle Snage

    How are you? “Busy busy busy...”

  • Yash Katireddy
    Yash Katireddy

    H

Want more conversations like this?

Join the Quartz community for all the intelligence, without the noise.

App Store BadgeGoogle Play Badge
Leaderboard Screenshot

A community of leaders, subject matter experts, and curious minds bringing nuance back to how we talk about the news.

Editors' Picks Screenshot

No content overload: our editors will curate the most notable and discussion-worthy pieces for you every day.

Share Screenshot

Don’t just read the story, tell it: contribute your ideas and experience to the dialogue.