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What American Men Do With Their Extra Half Hour of Daily Leisure Time

What American Men Do With Their Extra Half Hour of Daily Leisure Time

Read more on The Atlantic

Contributions

  • This article presumes that leisure time is the most desirable thing and ignores the fact that much of what people do that brings them true satisfaction does not come from free time per se. Also if women spend more time on self care than men that’s a kind of use of extra time as opposed to work and household

    This article presumes that leisure time is the most desirable thing and ignores the fact that much of what people do that brings them true satisfaction does not come from free time per se. Also if women spend more time on self care than men that’s a kind of use of extra time as opposed to work and household tasks that evens out the alleged gap. I get why these stats are compiled but I still find this gendering and generalization of everything irksome.

  • The key finding here is that while women’s workforce participation has increased, our share of household tasks has not decreased accordingly. This is not so much a leisure gap, but a cultural expectations gap. Both men and women still place home life firmly in the hands of females.

    Good news is that

    The key finding here is that while women’s workforce participation has increased, our share of household tasks has not decreased accordingly. This is not so much a leisure gap, but a cultural expectations gap. Both men and women still place home life firmly in the hands of females.

    Good news is that if TV changes, maybe so will the minds of the men watching it. Here’s looking at you, Hollywood/Netflix. In an ironic twist of fate, our leisure time is arguably in your hands.

  • Who has that much time every day?? Are these the same people from the Buzzfeed article about struggling millennials? I really hope not...

    That said, lots of people I know just *have to* catch up on the latest game of thrones or whatever. sure. And they let those things add up, consuming a lot of their

    Who has that much time every day?? Are these the same people from the Buzzfeed article about struggling millennials? I really hope not...

    That said, lots of people I know just *have to* catch up on the latest game of thrones or whatever. sure. And they let those things add up, consuming a lot of their time. Entertainment and social media are now competing with our ability to learn and invest in ourselves (and winning)

  • curious how much it has changed in last 10 years or so. TV got much better and there's streaming. Erik Hurst has lots of interesting work on the increasing quality of leisure activities.

  • I imagine that a good portion of respondents aren’t *just* watching tv. Might as well prepare dinner or exercise simultaneously.

  • This article lost me at “men have an average of 5.5 hours of leisure time per day.” I’m clearly doing something altogether wrong. That said, I fully agree that women, especially professional mothers, have a lot more guilt about taking time for themselves that doesn’t involve friends or family, including

    This article lost me at “men have an average of 5.5 hours of leisure time per day.” I’m clearly doing something altogether wrong. That said, I fully agree that women, especially professional mothers, have a lot more guilt about taking time for themselves that doesn’t involve friends or family, including watching TV...which is a lot less communal than it used to be in the era of Netflix and iPads. That needs to change.

  • A lot of Americans watch TV while doing other things- making dinner, folding laundry, doing dishes etc.. so not sure it’s literally 5 hours of focused uninterupted ‘leisure time’ as is implied . Second- the truth is that a lot of what is compelling Americans of both genders to watch TV these days is

    A lot of Americans watch TV while doing other things- making dinner, folding laundry, doing dishes etc.. so not sure it’s literally 5 hours of focused uninterupted ‘leisure time’ as is implied . Second- the truth is that a lot of what is compelling Americans of both genders to watch TV these days is that the quality of the content is really good- and a buzzed about show can serve as a way to socialize and relate to each other- it’s something we can talk about that we have in common- and is pure fun. That can be a really great thing to bring people together and create conversation and bonding, in a time when some things like politics, divide us and frankly stress us out.

  • Per Liana Sayer, a sociologist at the University of Maryland, “The idea is that men are able to watch more television, perhaps because they enjoy it, and the reason men are able to exercise greater preference in their time use choices is because they have [more] power than women.”

    The role of the gender

    Per Liana Sayer, a sociologist at the University of Maryland, “The idea is that men are able to watch more television, perhaps because they enjoy it, and the reason men are able to exercise greater preference in their time use choices is because they have [more] power than women.”

    The role of the gender gap must work to exacerbate these numbers I imagine. As well as the advent of former moviegoers instead opting for the ‘small screen’ of their TV or mobile device.