Skip to navigationSkip to content
Close
Exclusive: WeWork rebrands to The We Company; CEO Neumann talks about revised SoftBank round

Exclusive: WeWork rebrands to The We Company; CEO Neumann talks about revised SoftBank round

Read more on Fast Company

Contributions

  • Based on the vision of the co-founders, the WeWork rebranding to The We Company makes a lot of sense. It helps people to understand the possibilities of the brand from work to live to other aspects of one’s life, and signals to the broader community from investors to employees, customers and partners

    Based on the vision of the co-founders, the WeWork rebranding to The We Company makes a lot of sense. It helps people to understand the possibilities of the brand from work to live to other aspects of one’s life, and signals to the broader community from investors to employees, customers and partners of the ambitions the company has.

  • Rebranding WeWork is less a public-facing shift than a signal to investors (and would-be investors) that the company’s ambitions and trajectory are only just getting started. They see themselves as a far bigger platform than simply co-working locations ... and now, of course, they’ll have to translate

    Rebranding WeWork is less a public-facing shift than a signal to investors (and would-be investors) that the company’s ambitions and trajectory are only just getting started. They see themselves as a far bigger platform than simply co-working locations ... and now, of course, they’ll have to translate that talk (and that new brand) into significant action.

  • This shift makes complete sense. If you listen to Miguel McKelvey (one of the other co-founders of WeWork) on the How I Built This podcast, he refers to this ethos of "We" that touches each part of a worker's life.

    ...provided the actual physical components of The We Company evolve as well; otherwise

    This shift makes complete sense. If you listen to Miguel McKelvey (one of the other co-founders of WeWork) on the How I Built This podcast, he refers to this ethos of "We" that touches each part of a worker's life.

    ...provided the actual physical components of The We Company evolve as well; otherwise it's in danger of falling into an old stubborn brand.

  • The We Company wants to "encompass all aspects of people’s lives, in both physical and digital worlds."

    I guess you can't spell Wall-e without the W-E...

    I'm not a fan, but who knows, maybe the kids will like it.

  • I hope for Neumann’s sake he is right. Sometimes the downturn isn’t what you predicted and you find yourself preparing to do the one thing you promised yourself you would never do. In the immortal words of Mike Tyson “Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the face”. We will see if the burn turns

    I hope for Neumann’s sake he is right. Sometimes the downturn isn’t what you predicted and you find yourself preparing to do the one thing you promised yourself you would never do. In the immortal words of Mike Tyson “Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the face”. We will see if the burn turns to profit like everyone hopes and the We company becomes the $45 billion behemoth everyone says it will.

  • I’m curious about how Webank will play into this. It looks more like an ancillary service, but could grow into a funding platform for member businesses.

  • I... just... wait, what? This is either a terrible rebrand (it sounds like the Nintendo Wii) or is a good step towards a more generic brand.

    See them doing more community, real estate, events work with the idea around "we" and the spaces they already have.

  • ‘I work’ ...from home. I believe the co-working trend is ending.

  • When your main investor (SoftBank) shrinks its reported $20 billion investment in your “tech” start-up to only $2 billion after the Saudi’s Vision Fund (also part of Softbank) bailed on what many think is a glorified real estate deal, what do you do? Why, you change the name of the company to a wee one

    When your main investor (SoftBank) shrinks its reported $20 billion investment in your “tech” start-up to only $2 billion after the Saudi’s Vision Fund (also part of Softbank) bailed on what many think is a glorified real estate deal, what do you do? Why, you change the name of the company to a wee one, and you get the pro—corporate cheerleading press to gloss over the diminished investment and focus on the company’s positive aspects and its ambitions. According to CNN, the VisionFund is worth $93 billion and is largely funded by Saudi Arabia’s Sovereign Wealth Fund, more widely known as the Public Investment Fund (PIF). Among other investments, this fund owns 25 percent of Arm Holdings, the chipmaker that may replace Intel chips in Macs and is currently in all iPhones and iPads; SoftBank owns the other 75 percent of Arm Holdings. I think the real story here is that Saudi Arabia is still flooding tech companies with cash, and it prefers to invest in tech companies like Arm and not closed-system, work-living-education utopian microcities. I don’t know why WeWork or The We Company is valued so highly, but I do know the Saudis seem to be making a safer bet on things like Arm and Uber. I just hope that the part-owner of Apple’s main chip manufacturer stops killing journalists and violating human rights and avoids anti Semitic rhetoric. Apple should hope so too. By the looks things, it seems almost like SoftBank wanted to make its own version of China’s Foxconn out of a WeWork/Arm combo, where workers sleep, eat, defecate, and get their kids educated in a Walt Disney-esque closed system. Since every attempt at creating a utopia has historically produced a dystopian outcome, it looks like the Saudi’s made the right call. Let’s hope they make the right call on human rights, too.

  • WeWork agir se chama The We Company