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The life-draining tedium of errands is even worse in this age of digital convenience

By Quartz

If you are like pretty much everyone, you probably have a to-do list filled with seemingly simple tasks that somehow never get done. Instead ofRead full story

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  • For everyone, not just millennials. Niggling, unfinished tasks (NUTs) loop around and around in our heads, causing us stress, until they are done. And contrasted against what is easy (like ordering stuff on amazon), doing the old school hard stuff (like going to the post office) seems more difficult

    For everyone, not just millennials. Niggling, unfinished tasks (NUTs) loop around and around in our heads, causing us stress, until they are done. And contrasted against what is easy (like ordering stuff on amazon), doing the old school hard stuff (like going to the post office) seems more difficult. But it’s not difficult, it’s just tedious and inconvenient. Perspective (initiated by self or being forced by circumstances beyond your control) is an effective solution. Then a to-do list becomes just that: a list

  • I loved working on this story with my colleague Ephrat. It started with a gut response to Anne Helen Peterson’s thought-provoking piece on millennial burnout in BuzzFeed.

    We agreed with basically everything she said — but it seemed to us (two people on opposite sides of the “millennial” age spectrum

    I loved working on this story with my colleague Ephrat. It started with a gut response to Anne Helen Peterson’s thought-provoking piece on millennial burnout in BuzzFeed.

    We agreed with basically everything she said — but it seemed to us (two people on opposite sides of the “millennial” age spectrum) that this feeling of “errand paralysis” and overwhelming burnout was common to everyone operating within the global economy — not just millennials.

    And the responses to the article that we were seeing from Gen Xers and Baby Boomers only solidified this for us.

    What do you think about this concept of generational burnout? And what can be done about it? (We propose a solution)

  • As a Gen-Xer who specializes in putting off simple tasks, I had to respond to the recent feature in Buzzfeed about millennials feeling a unique sense of burnout. It seems to me that paralysis is a problem of our times and not one experienced especially by adults of one generation. We are all dealing

    As a Gen-Xer who specializes in putting off simple tasks, I had to respond to the recent feature in Buzzfeed about millennials feeling a unique sense of burnout. It seems to me that paralysis is a problem of our times and not one experienced especially by adults of one generation. We are all dealing with a changing world and too many passwords! Working with Annabelle made this article easy to write and not at all overwhelming, unlike some errands I've been putting off.

  • I love this response to the Burnout piece. This adds to the idea that burnout or challenges are present for anyone who participates in the global, digital economy, who aren't just millennials.

    “The easiest way to increase happiness is to control your use of time.”

  • Excellent article. In my view, a lot of technology that's intended to help us remember or organize tasks serves more to make the knowledge of those tasks unavoidable and harder to compartmentalize. Combine this with the fact that it's impossible to get away from your job anymore due to email, cell phones

    Excellent article. In my view, a lot of technology that's intended to help us remember or organize tasks serves more to make the knowledge of those tasks unavoidable and harder to compartmentalize. Combine this with the fact that it's impossible to get away from your job anymore due to email, cell phones, apps like slack, etc (not that these are bad, the problem is that many managers seem to think "I can still talk to my employees so they can still work") and... burnout.

    In other words, the problem isn't that we have too many things to do today, or that those things are too hard to do-- it's that whenever we stop to do one thing we're bombarded with reminders of everything else, which is psychologically confusing at best. This is more common in millennials/gen z because they're younger, and thus more likely to be at the low levels of an organization. The lower you are on the totem pole, the more chances the higher-ups have to foist crap on you, and the less ability you have to contest it.

  • To simply my life, I often say “no” not “why”. Figure out your priorities and stick to them. No need to provide a rationale.

  • The paralysis that comes with ongoing errands can be daunting, especially for those who, upon entering the workforce, come face to face with it for the first time. I tend to fight the mundanity by challenging myself in new and inventive ways throughout such tasks (or else it’d constantly feel like rinse-and-repeat).

  • True

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