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Having a kid was the unexpected cure for my “millennial burnout”

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  • Having children gives you a better toolset for prioritizing.

    Parents juice smoothies before sunrise, we do yoga, we “hang”, we work a lot, I like my avocado toast just like the next person, but I have kids so I have to be a prioritization jedi.

  • This lines up exactly with my comment on BuzzFeed's original Burnout story:

    Burnout comes from being too hard on yourself which comes from being a narcissist which starting a family can help moderate. it's pretty much the way all of human life has played out.

  • As true as the conclusion is, that having a kid rearranges your priorities in the best way, it feels icky to frame becoming a parent as a cure For anything. I get it: it’s a clicky headline. But being a parent isn’t something that anyone should treat as a solution to a problem. And if the internet has

    As true as the conclusion is, that having a kid rearranges your priorities in the best way, it feels icky to frame becoming a parent as a cure For anything. I get it: it’s a clicky headline. But being a parent isn’t something that anyone should treat as a solution to a problem. And if the internet has taught us anything, it’s that there are way too many people in the world who read clicky headlines way too literally.

    But yeah, being a parent is great, and the way it rearranges every molecule to recalibrate everything around the selfless mission of keeping another human alive is truly remarkable and invigorating.

  • Great points, but what about the more than 50 percent of married couples who get divorced? And what about working poor parents whose two or three jobs don’t even cover childcare? There’s something classist about this take and perspective, and its audience seems to be directed at only one segment of the

    Great points, but what about the more than 50 percent of married couples who get divorced? And what about working poor parents whose two or three jobs don’t even cover childcare? There’s something classist about this take and perspective, and its audience seems to be directed at only one segment of the millennial population, and therefore, yet another case of millennial narcissism, because it’s blind to so many millions of working poor parents and divorced parents and their plight. On the other hand, it is a great way for millennials of all

    economic classes to fast-track their way to becoming grandparents. ... If you really want to avoid Millennial burnout, or burnout at any age, I suggest getting a flip phone and deleting your social media accounts. I do not see social media use as compatible with good, present, mindful parenting. After all, it’s been widely reported that most silicon valley parents don’t let their kids have smartphones or iPads because they’re too addictive. And these are the parents that designed these devices, technologies, and platforms. That’s why they know better.

  • Well, many people do not have kids because in the current economy arrangements a child is a huge expense. Why even anyone is surprised? There is no accessible education in many countries. Kindergartens and creches are not considered a basic education that should be provided by taxes. Millennials themselves

    Well, many people do not have kids because in the current economy arrangements a child is a huge expense. Why even anyone is surprised? There is no accessible education in many countries. Kindergartens and creches are not considered a basic education that should be provided by taxes. Millennials themselves live with parents because can’t afford housing. There is no sustainable jobs and those that are there are working-poor jobs to keep babyboomers at senior positions comfy. I would like to engage in a conversation with the person that wrote the piece to ask: why? What is the objective of this text? Does it do good?

  • This piece captures how a lot of parents responded to the (great) BuzzFeed piece.

  • I really enjoyed this article. As a millennial mom, I totally relate to everything this author said, especially when the author said that they felt less free but it wasn’t bad. I know that a lot of millennials want to put off having kids because they will lose freedom; I think there is definitely a line

    I really enjoyed this article. As a millennial mom, I totally relate to everything this author said, especially when the author said that they felt less free but it wasn’t bad. I know that a lot of millennials want to put off having kids because they will lose freedom; I think there is definitely a line to draw in that regard. IMO you don’t want to just rush into having kids if you’re not in a relatively stable emotional/financial situation, but IMO you also don’t want to wait until you’ve “made it” with your career and all of your trips and everything fully “stable” to then have kids. Where is true struggle with that? Where does risk/reward come with that? Have you ever fully “made it” or is that the lie that social media perpetually continues to tell. That somehow you’re going to always be missing out on something and that should be feared.

    Does it stink knowing I can’t afford certain things because I currently put my career on the back burner to raise my child? Yes, sometimes it really does. It stinks to see my childless friends on social media galavanting around at concerts or girls nights or trips etc. But do I regret my decision to be a mom? Absolutely not.

  • This doesn’t really make sense. Forcing children upon yourself to motivate yourself?

    I don’t have kids and I thank God that I never did. I never wanted them but am I less motivated? Nope. I’m happier without them because I understand the costs and the stress which come with having them. You have children

    This doesn’t really make sense. Forcing children upon yourself to motivate yourself?

    I don’t have kids and I thank God that I never did. I never wanted them but am I less motivated? Nope. I’m happier without them because I understand the costs and the stress which come with having them. You have children because you want to....not to “cure” the burnout. Your priorities should come on your own without kids but that’s just my opinion.

  • No, for the majority of “millennials “ the remedy to the burnout is not having children. If they can’t handle taking care of themselves, they should not be birthing children and having that responsibility. There are classes for millennials who don’t know how to do adult things in life and I understand

    No, for the majority of “millennials “ the remedy to the burnout is not having children. If they can’t handle taking care of themselves, they should not be birthing children and having that responsibility. There are classes for millennials who don’t know how to do adult things in life and I understand that they are full.

    As one who is not a “millennial” I adopted two fun filled crazy four legged children, one 13 and one 4 months, I can tell you this with confidence that it is a lot of work, takes a lot of energy. There are days when I can’t wait for bedtime. With that being said, if the so-called millennial is complaining about “burnout” without children and only having to be responsible to only them, having additional responsibility will just cause more of the same.

    Having real responsibility, will not help, just cause problems for the child. It will be more “children raising children” in the future.

  • The cure to my millennial burn out was working for an awesome company that allows me to advance and continuously learn new things.

    People get burned out from repetitive overworking jobs