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Tim Cook says health innovation will be Apple's "greatest contribution to mankind"

Tim Cook says health innovation will be Apple's "greatest contribution to mankind"

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  • I cast off my iPhone because Apple insisted on controlling my user experience. The endless messages on my Mac to pay for more cloud storage have begun to annoy me. Apple wants to sell high-margin hardware that is mired in a rigid, proprietary ecosystem. The last thing we need is for this closed system

    I cast off my iPhone because Apple insisted on controlling my user experience. The endless messages on my Mac to pay for more cloud storage have begun to annoy me. Apple wants to sell high-margin hardware that is mired in a rigid, proprietary ecosystem. The last thing we need is for this closed system, with its expensive, status-oriented hardware, planned obsolescence and forced upgrades to take over our healthcare system. And who is securing all of our data?

  • It is a worthy goal. But our health data and personal analytics cannot be locked in an Apple ecosystem. As an avid Apple user, I won’t be participating if the data is not able to be easily moved across apps and services.

  • Apple needs the Watch to win the health-platform wars. They know you’ll want to preserve your privacy by being able to disguise what you are monitoring. They know you’ll want to be able to effortlessly store and connect because you will be required to supply all the data to your doctor, insurer or employer

    Apple needs the Watch to win the health-platform wars. They know you’ll want to preserve your privacy by being able to disguise what you are monitoring. They know you’ll want to be able to effortlessly store and connect because you will be required to supply all the data to your doctor, insurer or employer. They know that anything less will feel like the monitoring—and hence the condition—has taken over your life.

    Likely only Apple can make medical surveillance bearable, much less aesthetically appealing. The market isn’t just consumers—it’s employers and insurers who figure out the new economics of health as a platform service.

    This is especially true for insurance company buyers who will be focused on effectiveness and security much more than price.

  • Apple encrypts health data and stores it on your device so only you can access it. This means that they, and even the government, cannot access the data, even if they wanted to.

    The unsolved problem in healthcare data is actively sharing that data to API’s that can analyze and interpret the data to

    Apple encrypts health data and stores it on your device so only you can access it. This means that they, and even the government, cannot access the data, even if they wanted to.

    The unsolved problem in healthcare data is actively sharing that data to API’s that can analyze and interpret the data to provide a health solution. A lot of people are working on blockchain solutions to make sharing reliable, transparent, and revocable, so we still have a ways to go.

  • I hope Apple succeeds. Democratizing health care, that is taking what has traditionally been with institutions and empowering each of us as individuals to manage our health is massively important to us all.

  • As much as I like open ecosystems- third party integrations are one of the biggest offenders for misappropriated data. Apple’s propensity to keep data to themselves may be a good thing.

  • Until they fix the battery life to be greater than 48 hours, it isn't a useful health tool, because you cannot use it as an effective sleep-monitoring device.

  • Two important things to underline of this if it is to be Apple’s greatest contribution to mankind! First, working in collaboration with (health) institutions (and not google, insurances or any other data-driven firms) to support a cheaper and more accessible healthcare for all will be key. I hope Tim

    Two important things to underline of this if it is to be Apple’s greatest contribution to mankind! First, working in collaboration with (health) institutions (and not google, insurances or any other data-driven firms) to support a cheaper and more accessible healthcare for all will be key. I hope Tim Cook will maintain its privacy mindset because the type of healthcare data we are taking about could be misused in so many ways.. Second, Apple will have to get involved in developing countries’ market to truly make a difference for mankind... and not by selling $1,000 iPhone!

  • This is going to make life very hard and very complicated for insurers which may not be a bad thing per se but which I fear will have unfortunate, unintended consequences (unless you live in wonderful countries like the UK that have an NHS!).

  • Maybe Tim Cook can do something positive with healthcare for mankind rather than trying to enslave all the workers of all nations to fill their coffers with the maximum amount of money at the detriment of the workers.