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Why decades of aid has failed to dig poor nations out of poverty

Why decades of aid has failed to dig poor nations out of poverty

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  • Aid will definitely not solve poverty. The suggestion to direct assistance to entrepreneurs/job generating causes is more than welcome, but innovation today primarily focuses on reducing human intervention (jobs), hence, aid for primary needs could be all that we can do for now.

    & imagine the world without aid really

  • We don’t know where the money ended up. It’s naive to think it was used for its intended purpose. Third world countries are infamous for diverting foreign aid into personal use by their corrupt officials. Even if the aid is not monetary they find a way to sell food, drugs and health items at a profit

    We don’t know where the money ended up. It’s naive to think it was used for its intended purpose. Third world countries are infamous for diverting foreign aid into personal use by their corrupt officials. Even if the aid is not monetary they find a way to sell food, drugs and health items at a profit. Our foreign policy is just plain dumb.

  • Author’s answer to the prosperity paradox: Nurture local companies making basic products that innovatively satisfy an unserved need, and employ a lot of people.

  • This concept of aid is common sense when it comes down to it. Like the saying goes “Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day, teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime.” I doubt that after the monetary aid was given that the money was tracked to see that is was being used correctly. However

    This concept of aid is common sense when it comes down to it. Like the saying goes “Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day, teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime.” I doubt that after the monetary aid was given that the money was tracked to see that is was being used correctly. However, with this approach the native people are able to build not only an industrial economy, but also a sense of being, which can be hard to find even in the “civilized” world.

  • According to ourworldindata.org, about 10% of the world's people live in extreme poverty, down from 37% in 1990.

  • Tageting education and infrastructure through foreign aid only “seem” to attack poverty. It’s building businesses, providing products, and employing people, that really attack poverty — look at China, Japan, and Korea.