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CEO corner

Why Nike selected a tech executive as its next CEO. The company has been investing heavily in tech and data analytics. It sees its new CEO leading it into a future focused on data-driven, direct-to-consumer sales.

Why Nike selected a tech executive as its next CEO

"Parker, who has been Nike's CEO since 2006 and has worked at the company for four decades, will become the company's executive chairman, according to the press release."

This is one of the most important parts; Nike needed Parker in some sort of capacity after he steps down as CEO for 13 years.

Why

"Parker, who has been Nike's CEO since 2006 and has worked at the company for four decades, will become the company's executive chairman, according to the press release."

This is one of the most important parts; Nike needed Parker in some sort of capacity after he steps down as CEO for 13 years.

Why?

Because Parker steered the company through countless potential disasters, from the gender discrimination mess in 2018 and the Kaepernick campaign backlash to their disservice to pregnant athletes. He didn't just address them; he fixed the problems, wiped out the bad actors, and managed to TRIPLE sales.

Parker is a heck of an architect.

The business of travel

Live from the International Astronautical Congress

The latest on Brexit

WeWork gets worse

SoftBank takes over WeWork. The board of the shared office company chose the Japanese conglomerate over a competing offer from JP Morgan, the Wall Street Journal reports. Co-founder Adam Neumann will lose control of WeWork—but get a $1.7 billion payout.

Neumann to Get Up to $1.7 Billion to Exit WeWork as SoftBank Takes Control

Being a big fan of WeWork’s service, it is sad to see the devaluation hitting this level. Moreover, the payout to Adam N is beyond silly for a company that is going to need a major structural face lift.

WeWork is really a true unicorn: a creature that only was viable in the mind of Adam Neumann...

While I believe it might be possible to make the business model work through a greater focus on corporate customers, the governance and hubris on the company’s leadership and greedy backers quickly contributed

WeWork is really a true unicorn: a creature that only was viable in the mind of Adam Neumann...

While I believe it might be possible to make the business model work through a greater focus on corporate customers, the governance and hubris on the company’s leadership and greedy backers quickly contributed to unrealistic valuations.

And now SoftBank will have to live with the creature it helped create...

Marking 30 years of the web

China's new place in the world

India's coal addiction

India’s hard push on renewables isn’t about climate change—yet. Quartz explores how India is meeting the challenge of providing increasing amounts of energy to its people while trying to lower its dependence on fossil fuels. ✦

India’s hard push on renewables isn’t about climate change—yet

Unlike the rest of the anglophilic world—Canada, the US, Australia, and the UK—India has never encountered a significant culture of climate-change denial. But the awareness of climate change in India hasn’t been high either. So the rise of renewables in India, which has been nothing short of spectacular

Unlike the rest of the anglophilic world—Canada, the US, Australia, and the UK—India has never encountered a significant culture of climate-change denial. But the awareness of climate change in India hasn’t been high either. So the rise of renewables in India, which has been nothing short of spectacular, has other motivations: from energy security to soft power.

Making immigration work

Time to get lost in a museum...

... and come back soon

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A bigger life in a smaller city

A bigger life in a smaller city

Read more on Curbed

From Our Members

  • You know the moment when someone expresses what you feel and think in a piece. For some time already I am of impression that mega-cities lost their appeal. Be that for me changing and/or mainstreaming of the city-quality-of-life politics and fashions. My recent statement on that is that the best cities

    You know the moment when someone expresses what you feel and think in a piece. For some time already I am of impression that mega-cities lost their appeal. Be that for me changing and/or mainstreaming of the city-quality-of-life politics and fashions. My recent statement on that is that the best cities have “million and a bit” inhabitants.

    In Europe checkout for example: Valencia (ES), Wrocław (PL), Brussels (BE). With their quality of life that gives metropolitan feeling (sometimes) but remaining cities where walking is an alternative to taking public transport.

  • Love this article. I moved from a small town to a large city ages ago. Couldn’t wait to shake off the dust of my hometown. The older I get, the more I wonder if the next part of my life is in the obscure quiet of a small town.

  • "I occasionally described myself as “good at New York.” I was able to maintain a life there. But that’s just it. I was only maintaining. I was not thriving. And it seems like a good and important question to ask oneself: What do you need to do in order to thrive?"

  • This is such a clever article, which talks about what really goes on when you move from a big city to a small one. It’s far more than the surface level changes about “knowing your community” and runs much deeper as you figure out how it changes what you commit to in your life. In a big city the anonymity

    This is such a clever article, which talks about what really goes on when you move from a big city to a small one. It’s far more than the surface level changes about “knowing your community” and runs much deeper as you figure out how it changes what you commit to in your life. In a big city the anonymity the author speaks to and all the rituals she describes are like a protective wall which allowed her to thrive and love the city but left a sense of distance with herself. A small city means those things start to dissipate and, over time, you realize you’ve made a deeper commitment to the place you’ve chosen. Almost like a constraint of choices means your bond with a narrower choice feels stronger than always keeping your options open.

    What did Baz Lurhmann say? “Live in New York City once, but leave before it makes you hard.

    Live in Northern California once, but leave before it makes you soft.”

    Caveat: doesn’t apply so much if you are born, raised and continue to live in said big city.

  • I agree that a good-size small city gives you a better life. I lived in Tokyo before I moved to Cincinnati. I had not noticed how I felt stressed by the crowded and busy metropolitan until I came here.

  • To me, the culture she's describing is just pure New Orleans, not necessarily any small city (also, a small city to me is a lot smaller than that—I escape the for-real smallness of Richmond, Virginia for New Orleans twice a year). Or maybe the culture she's describing is really "any place that isn't

    To me, the culture she's describing is just pure New Orleans, not necessarily any small city (also, a small city to me is a lot smaller than that—I escape the for-real smallness of Richmond, Virginia for New Orleans twice a year). Or maybe the culture she's describing is really "any place that isn't New York?" I dunno, I see some wild New Yorker generalizations in here that I feel like the rest of the country would be like "well duh" about.

  • Why is it ‘indulgent’ now to want to be happy?

  • While size matters, so does where the smaller city is, and what is its culture. There are significant differences, between East, West, and South. Some areas welcome newcomers, some do not. If you decide to move, spend some time in the new community, during each season. Spend some time there getting to

    While size matters, so does where the smaller city is, and what is its culture. There are significant differences, between East, West, and South. Some areas welcome newcomers, some do not. If you decide to move, spend some time in the new community, during each season. Spend some time there getting to know the place. You may love it, or you might not.

  • Love this. Not sure it’s entirely possible for me but living a more countrified life without a commute to the city would be pretty great.