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Alessandro Cripsta

Good evening.

Washington at home and abroad

The next G7 will be held at a Trump resort. The White House announced the 2020 summit will take place at Trump National Doral golf resort near Miami, Reuters reports.

Trump will host G7 summit next year at one of his own properties: White House official

As we reported last month, if any other federal employee were to make this deal, they would likely be prosecuted: https://qz.com/1706517/trumps-bid-to-bring-g7-to-his-doral-resort-is-probably-illegal/

Allowing this to happen flies in the face of the Emoluments Clause. I don't care if they make you believe it will save money. His Doral property, like a lot of his properties, aren't doing well, and having taxpayers pay to bail out his properties is insanity.

It doesn't matter if it's done at cost

Allowing this to happen flies in the face of the Emoluments Clause. I don't care if they make you believe it will save money. His Doral property, like a lot of his properties, aren't doing well, and having taxpayers pay to bail out his properties is insanity.

It doesn't matter if it's done at cost. This is still using federal dollars to keep his properties above water. It's all he cares about. If you don't believe me, when was the last time he talked about the GLWA? Or Feral Hogs invading new states? Or fires out west? Only when he thinks it averts attention to something else he doesn't want to talk about.

The optics here don’t look good. Mulvaney may say that it’s being held at cost but unless they open up the books why must we believe them. More than anything this is an endorsement of any leader who uses their position to profit and that has long term ramifications.

How can you know which Trump impeachment polls to believe? As with all polling, the results depend to some extent on who is polled, what they are asked, and when.

How to know which Trump impeachment polls to believe

Here’s what this comes down to:

(1). Is national support for impeachment and removal north of 70%?

(2). Is GOP support north of 50%?

(3). Support for impeachment in the key Senate races in 2020.

(4). Data on whether Congressional Republicans are better off with Trump at the top of the ticket or

Here’s what this comes down to:

(1). Is national support for impeachment and removal north of 70%?

(2). Is GOP support north of 50%?

(3). Support for impeachment in the key Senate races in 2020.

(4). Data on whether Congressional Republicans are better off with Trump at the top of the ticket or someone else (like Romney).

This is a mathematical question and nothing else.

Facebucks 2.0

Facebook’s payments strategy isn’t Libra, it’s WhatsApp. Mark Zuckerberg hopes to test WhatsApp Pay in Mexico before the end of 2019. The ramifications are far more realistic than Libra's theoretical impact on US monetary policy—and they would affect users worldwide.

Facebook’s payments strategy isn’t Libra, it’s WhatsApp

If you look at Asian messaging platforms like WeChat or Line, they look far more successful for being payment solutions. Facebook Messenger didn't make it in the ​US.

American tech companies seem eager to go to South America for testing their financial solutions (Due to the small number of people having

If you look at Asian messaging platforms like WeChat or Line, they look far more successful for being payment solutions. Facebook Messenger didn't make it in the ​US.

American tech companies seem eager to go to South America for testing their financial solutions (Due to the small number of people having access to a bank, lower than the US). With WhatsApp's presence in Brazil and other South American countries, Facebook's bet on WhatsApp as payments strategy looks way more logical than Visa-betrayed Libra.

Facebook's Libra has won all the headlines recently. But over the last couple years, it's been WhatsApp that's quietly pioneered payments in India. Facebook is looking to go international with WhatsApp Pay.

The new TV

Shut it down

Brexit deal reached

The EU and the UK agreed on a Brexit deal, but there are many hurdles ahead. Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist Party said it’s still not backing the deal, BBC reports. Their support is essential if Johnson wants to pass it through parliament on Saturday.

Brexit deal reaction as PM heads to EU summit - BBC News

We now have a hastily-agreed, last-minute deal, an agreement that would ensure a reasonably orderly British departure from the EU. But despite Boris Johnson’s fanfare, the devil’s in the detail. The Tory party’s own partner in this strange minority government, Northern Ireland’s DUP, won’t back this

We now have a hastily-agreed, last-minute deal, an agreement that would ensure a reasonably orderly British departure from the EU. But despite Boris Johnson’s fanfare, the devil’s in the detail. The Tory party’s own partner in this strange minority government, Northern Ireland’s DUP, won’t back this deal, making it unlikely it’ll get through Parliament.

What comes after the iPhone?

The future of work

The world in 50 years

What will we eat? “A lot more plants,” says scientist and author Bill Nye. Check out the predictions from artist and activist Mai Khôi, Andreessen Horowitz general partner Vijay Pande, transhumanist Zoltan Istvan, and more thought leaders.

The World in 50 Years: What will we eat?

First, what a great project Quartz has put together here. Second, eating will be determined by how fast the microprocessor evolves. If we become full cyborgs dependent on solar, etc, we could very quickly as a species lose our need for biological food altogether. That’s what the Singularity is sbout

First, what a great project Quartz has put together here. Second, eating will be determined by how fast the microprocessor evolves. If we become full cyborgs dependent on solar, etc, we could very quickly as a species lose our need for biological food altogether. That’s what the Singularity is sbout. Radical transformation. Super radical!

Meat-free around the world

You'll never guess the world’s best city for vegan-friendly dining. A surprising winner emerges in a new ranking of the top 10 cities for vegan-friendly restaurants.

Guess the world’s best city for vegan-friendly dining! No, try again

On the face of it Dublin would appear to be a shock result, but that's only if you consider a high rate of vegan-friendly restaurants to be a product exclusively of social, cultural and/or religious concentrations that "break through" the norm to establish a new norm.

This theory tends to focus on

On the face of it Dublin would appear to be a shock result, but that's only if you consider a high rate of vegan-friendly restaurants to be a product exclusively of social, cultural and/or religious concentrations that "break through" the norm to establish a new norm.

This theory tends to focus on the notion of "changing minds" among existing populations -- a traditional cultural understanding of the focus of many vegan practitioners -- rather than any analysis of the increasing impact of global population movements and the massively increased interconnection of cities in particular around the planet.

In the case of Dublin, the surprised narrative would have us understand it to be a city still very much in the traditional stereotypical Irish model -- a mix of Catholicism, traditional pub food, Guinness pints and some of the finest of the melancholy arts. In this stage, it is no wonder anyone would be surprised that the opening of a single vegan restaurant, let alone a thriving vegan-friendly culture is a shock to all.

Pints dropped. Instant titterring among groups of elderly women. Elderly men slowly shake their heads and look to the sky. A young Irish babe begins to wail and somewhere in the background a rather frail looking priest in full traditional black cassock and collar faints from the intensity of the experience.

It's an easy narrative and all-to-unfortunately accepted one among far too many when thinking of Dublin.

But there's quite a different one that's clear to many who have watched Dublin transform in the past decades from a local capital of a nation struggling to find it's feet in the shadows of its former imperial masters to one of the major global nodes of trans-national economic, tech, design and culture systems.

As this node, Dublin had seen the world come to it -- to exchange ideas, cultures, technologies and, at the end of the day, populations. While the public mindset of what Dublin is may still be easily lured into traditional archaic stereotypes, the reality is that Dublin's vegan-friendly ranking is nothing more than a reflection of its place among the increasingly tight network of global cities.

We need to start thinking in terms of global culture and networks when we talk about cities that are willing to engage directly in these global networks. Cities will continue to have their own unique flavours, but they will also be drawing upon each other in ways we are not fully appreciating. Reinterpreting our stereotypical assumptions about why city data has the results it does will be essential if we are to effectively understand how our major global urban areas are continuing to evolve.

Fun read! But if it is baed on really fun article. I love the reveal. But, if it is based on Tripadvisor, what about cities that are not as active?

Hungry for more? Come back soon!

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American educators are treating Trump’s presidency as the ultimate teachable moment

Read more on Quartz

From Our Members

  • When I first started using this app, my editor explained that it could be a good place to share with readers what goes into reporting and writing a story. She gave me an example and said “if you have interesting quotes or facts that you didn’t have space to include, the Quartz app is a good place to

    When I first started using this app, my editor explained that it could be a good place to share with readers what goes into reporting and writing a story. She gave me an example and said “if you have interesting quotes or facts that you didn’t have space to include, the Quartz app is a good place to share those.” Back then I thought that would never happen; it’s sometimes difficult to get ONE good quote for a story, and I rarely (if ever) have leftovers.

    But this story has proved me wrong. It started with a passing observation, made to a colleague, that teachers must be having a hard time teaching their students about Trump. Later, I wondered if that was true. After all, maybe it’s not that different from teaching them about previous presidents. So, thanks to the Quartz newsroom, I tracked down three social studies/government/history teachers in Ohio, New Jersey, and New York, and a children’s civics book author in the DC area, and asked them a simple question: What’s it like to be a teacher in the age of Trump?

    Those interviews yielded dozens of insightful, surprising, and emotional responses, many of which I couldn’t include because of space constraints. Here are just a few of those I left out:

    Matt Polazzo, an AP American government teacher at Stuyvesant High School in New York City, told me that he tries to get his students to go beyond the daily news cycle and think about the bigger picture. “I also do...tie it in to this larger narrative,” he told me. "Is Trump himself responsible for the decline of America, or is the decline of America responsible for the rise of Trump?”

    Sean Cannon, a US history and AP comparative government teacher at South Brunswick High School in New Jersey, surprised me when he explained how difficult it had become for him and his fellow teachers to openly debate Trump’s policies and actions with his students. When I pressed him to give me an example, he actually said he found it easier to engage with his students about Abu Ghraib under president George W. Bush in the early 2000s than to talk to kids today about Trump.

    Obviously, I was surprised and slightly shocked by that comparison. But he stood by it when I pressed him, and said one of the reasons why it’s become so hard is because teachers are worried about outside pressure. “I think there’s a lot less of going into depth on [Trump] to avoid the potential of having a nasty email or a phone call from a supervisor about an angry parent,” he told me. "I think that’s probably true of most of the teachers in the department.”

    But that’s not all! Read my story below for more fascinating insights from educators on this unique moment in history:

  • This also provides opportunity to teach the Constitution itself as well as its development over time. It ought to also provide more interest in the Founding Fathers & their challenges in compromise as well as looking at the previous great disrupter, Andrew Jackson, who broke the power of Massachusetts

    This also provides opportunity to teach the Constitution itself as well as its development over time. It ought to also provide more interest in the Founding Fathers & their challenges in compromise as well as looking at the previous great disrupter, Andrew Jackson, who broke the power of Massachusetts & Virginia & brought the West into the real body politic.

  • "Regardless of what happens after the end of Trump’s term, his presidency is this generation of educators’ ultimate teachable moment. 'The worse the government gets, the more interested people are in the subject,' Polazzo says. 'Unfortunately, it seems that only the crises bring about engagement sometimes.'"

  • It's obvious when you see someone comment on an issue that they failed their civics class.

    But how ignorant do you have to be to fail SATURDAY MORNING CARTOONS.

    I mean every Saturday at least twice an hr they would run that little bill singing about he wanted to become law.

    I mean I get so frustrated

    It's obvious when you see someone comment on an issue that they failed their civics class.

    But how ignorant do you have to be to fail SATURDAY MORNING CARTOONS.

    I mean every Saturday at least twice an hr they would run that little bill singing about he wanted to become law.

    I mean I get so frustrated when I see that there's so many ignorant people commenting on something they should have learned in 3rd grade and are completely clueless about what it is their talking about.

  • It will be super interesting to teach the Trump administration once it hits the history books, in what 20-40 years he’ll be part of high school texts- but we should also think about how the Trump era is recontextualizing history as kids learn it today.