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Hospitals Must Now Post Prices. But It May Take a Brain Surgeon to Decipher Them.

By The New York Times

WASHINGTON — Vanderbilt University Medical Center, responding to a new Trump administration order to begin posting all hospital prices, listed a charge of $42,569 for a cardiology procedure described as “HC PTC CLOS PAT DUCT ARTRead full story

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  • It seems like a great opportunity for an entrepreneur to translate this information into useable format and help empower the patient as it was intended to do.

  • As with many things it will all come down to the execution. This quote by Jeanne Pinder is on point: “This policy is a tiny step forward, but falls far short of what’s needed,” said Jeanne Pinder, founder and chief executive of Clear Health Costs, a consumer health research organization.”

  • Hospitals are so shady, they won’t even let a broken clock (trump admin) be right twice a day. The simple fact that they’re finding ways to make them posting prices pointless just goes to show that they could give a you know what about folks actually getting better. They’re only in it for the money.

  • As many have pointed out in other comments, it will be a matter of how the information is delivered. This process will have an incredibly hard time taking off if all services are presented as if they were restaurant menu items, perhaps excluding independent practitioners who provide simple check-ups (e.g. the Direct Primary Care movement).

    This is, though, an important first step towards achieving transparency in medical costs, which can potentially lead to more affordable care via natural market competition.

  • This is a step forward at least. The fact that a bee sting cost me over $6000 (this was beyond by deductible and did not include the outrageous expense of an epi-pen) but I didn’t know what my best option might be as I was gasping for breathe. The truth is those needing surgery are looking overseas for cutting edge surgeries and spa-like treatment while they recover for thousands or hundreds of thousands less for subpar service here in the US. Thinking that single payer will solve this is a joke

    This is a step forward at least. The fact that a bee sting cost me over $6000 (this was beyond by deductible and did not include the outrageous expense of an epi-pen) but I didn’t know what my best option might be as I was gasping for breathe. The truth is those needing surgery are looking overseas for cutting edge surgeries and spa-like treatment while they recover for thousands or hundreds of thousands less for subpar service here in the US. Thinking that single payer will solve this is a joke. It just means there will be medical services for those who can pay and basic treatment for everyone else.

  • This is a worthy goal but it seems a taxonomy system needs to be developed still. A language that ensures the true (incorporating system prices) and intelligible price is displayed to enable informed consumer decision making.

  • So the reality of the situation is this really only applies to those private paying. Beyond that it is your insurance company and the specific plan that determines what is “good and customary,” based on the insurance company contract the hospital agreed to. Hospitals can use the differential as a write off in some cases, but what they charge Premera or Regence is otherwise practically irrelevant.

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