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The Art of Decision-Making

By The New Yorker

Your life choices aren’t just about what you want to do, Joshua Rothman writes—they’re about who you want to beRead full story

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  • We make too many career choices based on ambition over aspiration. Ambition is what we want to achieve. Aspiration is who we want to become. When deciding between jobs or organizations, ask how they’ll shape your identity.

  • I agree that for most life choices, we are deciding primarily based on an aspirational future or identity. It’s difficult to make rational decisions comparing options based on relative weights of a fortune teller’s future. Now...“fries or a salad” is a decision I can really sink my teeth into.

  • This meta-review on some decision science books is a nice complement to the Quartz piece I picked on the fourth industrial revolution and thinking about the future. Whereas that was a macro perspective, this is a bit more micro, emphasizing how often we have to make decisions that affect things we cannot (as opposed to do not) know, including how we’ll feel about future states. A good addition to the thoughtful/humility toolkit for both individuals and organizations thinking about strategic choices.

  • "...living 'authentically' requires occasionally leaving your old self behind 'to create and discover a new self.' Part of being alive is awaiting the 'revelation' of 'who you’ll become.'"

  • Decisions get away from us, I guess the question is what results can you live with? Said art can be comparable to gymnastics. Sometimes you’re just trying to LAND.

  • Thank you Rajesh for sharing your insights as it is connected to the 4th Industrialized Revolution. This article looks at decision making as it appears as a 2D choice. Darwin’s conundrum of marriage and family was a question about stability and legacy. Did he want a life with or without responsibilities? The article does not ask what Darwin thought his greatest accomplishment might be.

    I’d like to ask, what happens when choices are made based on a value or belief or even a higher power like religious

    Thank you Rajesh for sharing your insights as it is connected to the 4th Industrialized Revolution. This article looks at decision making as it appears as a 2D choice. Darwin’s conundrum of marriage and family was a question about stability and legacy. Did he want a life with or without responsibilities? The article does not ask what Darwin thought his greatest accomplishment might be.

    I’d like to ask, what happens when choices are made based on a value or belief or even a higher power like religious beliefs? Would that provide more insight or conviction in the result of decision making?

    How would our decisions change on the impact we want to make to our world? Would we take or give back? Do we act for money and status or for the experience of the journey?

    To do that, you need to know who you are. Unfortunately, I believe, we are losing our ability to have this authentic self knowledge because we are so connected to the digital world and we are making decisions based on the information made available to us (aka: algorithm driven feedback) or a reflection of what we already think instead of being open to new ideas and respectful conversation to discuss differences. Having a human being look you in the eye and confirm what you say is true is a much more impactful way to make decisions than creating a list of pro and cons.

  • "It would be strange to stage a war game about a prospective marriage." Quote of the day.

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