Skip to navigationSkip to content
Zack Rosebrugh

Good afternoon.

SCOTUS update

Metals.com scam

Amazon attrition

At the movies

Fashion forward

Reshaping society

Electric cars make their mark

2019 was the year electric vehicles grew up. From budget Kias to fleets of e-trucks, this was the biggest year for vehicular electrification yet—but several blockbuster launches belie a hard road ahead as automakers are forced to reinvent themselves.

2019 was the year electric cars grew up

Tesla flexed its muscle in the market even as overall EV sales softened. Global automakers have committed $225 billion toward electrification -- well past the point of no return despite 2019's worrying dip in EV sales (at least for cars not built by Tesla). Overall, it was the year things got serious

Tesla flexed its muscle in the market even as overall EV sales softened. Global automakers have committed $225 billion toward electrification -- well past the point of no return despite 2019's worrying dip in EV sales (at least for cars not built by Tesla). Overall, it was the year things got serious for EVs.Tesla has done the yeoman's work of proving you can sell a million or so electric cars to the masses. Its Model 3 accounted for 1 out of every 6 EVs sold worldwide. Now VW, GM, Ford, and others have painted a giant target on Tesla's back. Let the race begin.

Record low unemployment

Americans locked up abroad

Canopy branches out

Get smart about parenting

Raising a child is hard. But the “parenting is hard” trope, which feeds memes and dinner conversations, can be dangerous. It frames the problem as the individual failure of a single parent rather than as a social issue.

The hardest part of being a parent has nothing to do with raising kids

I always say we have to raise our girls to be brave, not perfect. But it's not enough for parents to try to do this work alone, we have to change as a society because our kids are getting messages from everywhere - media, school, classmates - so it's on all of us together.

See you later!

Close
Three out of four say CEOs should take the lead on social change

Three out of four say CEOs should take the lead on social change

Read more on Axios Politics

Contributions

  • This year’s Edelman’s Trust Barometer makes it clear that business leaders must step up to drive positive social change — especially when it comes to preparing workers and society for the rapid pace of technological change, to get ready for Industry 4.0, and to be part of the #FutureWorkforce. Employees

    This year’s Edelman’s Trust Barometer makes it clear that business leaders must step up to drive positive social change — especially when it comes to preparing workers and society for the rapid pace of technological change, to get ready for Industry 4.0, and to be part of the #FutureWorkforce. Employees expect their employers to contribute to positive societal change. According to Accenture, trust is the ultimate currency. CEOs have a vital role in building a trustworthy digital economy. By creating a safe and secure internet, businesses can make the digital economy—and its handling of our money—trustworthy again. We all must do our part to bring about positive social change and create an inclusive environment to build a highly diverse workforce. This will unlock creativity and drive innovation.

  • This year’s Edelman’s Trust Barometer shows employees expect their employers to contribute to positive societal change. No longer can business leaders be bystanders—we all must do our part to bring about positive change, particularly when it comes to preparing workers and society for the rapid pace of

    This year’s Edelman’s Trust Barometer shows employees expect their employers to contribute to positive societal change. No longer can business leaders be bystanders—we all must do our part to bring about positive change, particularly when it comes to preparing workers and society for the rapid pace of change of Industry 4.0. This year’s Deloitte Industry 4.0 Readiness Report of Global CXOs reinforces many of these findings.

  • The tribal nature of human beings wants someone, a leader, to speak up on behalf of the group. Companies have become our de facto tribes. Brands spend millions of dollars creating powerful images. It’s only natural that we expect the leaders of these ubiquitous and powerful brands to stand up for what we believe in.

  • This is about filling a void in leadership: Our Harris Poll data: 8 out of 10 consumers don’t believe government can solve today’s issues alone and want business to get more involved.

  • This is about leadership. Or more to the point - a lack of it. Employees are too smart to settle for words from their CEOs. They need to see action or they will take action.

  • It’s a logical outcome of business leaders being seen to lead and highlights the contrast that politicians are now seen as masters of division.

  • It’s pretty clear that we can no longer rely on the apparatus of government (particularly the Federal Government) to build and protect the type of society most of us aspire to. That leaves companies, NGOs and Individuals.

    More and more we see people insisting on knowing not what a company makes, but what makes the company.

  • I’m at Davos this year. The void left by politicians is a huge issue. Trump hasn’t come, May hasn’t come. Bolsanaro’s speech lasted just 15 minutes. And he’s a sceptic in climate change, the issue that WEF members believe is the main threat to the global economy. But how can executives step into this

    I’m at Davos this year. The void left by politicians is a huge issue. Trump hasn’t come, May hasn’t come. Bolsanaro’s speech lasted just 15 minutes. And he’s a sceptic in climate change, the issue that WEF members believe is the main threat to the global economy. But how can executives step into this void? Many of these issues can only be addressed with political input.

  • I work for the company so I am biased, but this research is still worth reading.

  • You need to define what you mean by social change, internal or external. Political, apolitical? As I read the article, it seemed to be more about management transparency and equal treatment. Those have been accepted as the norm for years, just not implemented by all companies. If we are talking about

    You need to define what you mean by social change, internal or external. Political, apolitical? As I read the article, it seemed to be more about management transparency and equal treatment. Those have been accepted as the norm for years, just not implemented by all companies. If we are talking about more Global social change, I not sure I want a Corporate CEO Guru, telling me has I should live. Their principles may be diametrically opposed to mine. I think a company should be honest, and transparent with bot employees and follow governmental guidelines. Social Change, should come from the populace.

  • They do. It’s just whether 3 out of 4 CEOs actually do it...

  • In an ideal world they would. But the risk of getting it very wrong and being fired is probably too great. Stick prices alone are tricky enough to ‘get right’.

  • Here we go again. When special interests cannot accomplish what they want through the electoral process, they look to other ways for meeting thier objectives. I have no problem with the authors intent to improve our quality of life. But the idea that we should look to CEOs for social advocacy is myopic

    Here we go again. When special interests cannot accomplish what they want through the electoral process, they look to other ways for meeting thier objectives. I have no problem with the authors intent to improve our quality of life. But the idea that we should look to CEOs for social advocacy is myopic. A CEO has one concern, corporate success which leads to profits and shareholder happiness.

    What skill set makes CEOs more intuitive to the needs of those who do not fit that corporations targeted population? I'm pretty sure that if you asked the CEO of a company that utilizes GMO technology, he/she could talk the benefits to society of GMO tech. The CEO of the NRA could argue the benefits of manatory gun ownership. Do you really want Zuckerberg to lead a social revolution? Why would any employee follow the "Socialy conscious" CEO when they can fire you at any time for any reason?

    With CEOs leading social change who represents homeless? Under employed individuals? Unemployed? You would leave this population's concerns with a 1%er?

    Social change starts at the bottom, not the top. Do you honestly believe the Civil Rights movement would have happened when corporate dictates kept people of color from even doing business with them?

    The only flag we should salute is the Stars and Stripes. Not Google. McDonald's, Ford or Monsanto.

  • About time... .05 out of 4 actually do anything about it. Unlike most of their salaries, talk is still cheap.

  • 3 out of 4 do not align politically. What change exactly should be taking place? Why should it be driven by unelected profit-driven white guys?

  • Companies exist for the benefit of its owners.

    CEOs work for the owners,they are not employed to drive social change.

    Sadly there are not many business leaders that have the balls to announce it loudly and clearly.

  • Let me get this straight. You think the greediest of our society are going to implement social change in a positive way? Between tax breaks for the rich and gov't bailouts all prompted by these CEO's; we've left it up to CEO's since the late '70's and since then our middle class has dwindled down to

    Let me get this straight. You think the greediest of our society are going to implement social change in a positive way? Between tax breaks for the rich and gov't bailouts all prompted by these CEO's; we've left it up to CEO's since the late '70's and since then our middle class has dwindled down to record lows. The number of poor have increased to record highs and you think the fat cats have the answers?

    That deserves a common mans "c'mon man!"

  • That's right, they'll make decisions based on battling with their competitors. Great idea