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Cambridge University’s brain-training app works like Ritalin without the side effects

Cambridge University’s brain-training app works like Ritalin without the side effects

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Contributions

  • I’m sure there are a lot of activities which are as effective, if not more effective, than Ritalin. Taking a walk for example. Solving for the symptoms and not the underlying cause of a disease is profitable for drug companies but not for our health.

  • So, they found that when people are being studied for how they are supposed to pay attention, they found that they can pay attention? Here’s a different point: maybe all this talk of kids having short attention spans is because we’ve taught them spending one second on something is the way to go through

    So, they found that when people are being studied for how they are supposed to pay attention, they found that they can pay attention? Here’s a different point: maybe all this talk of kids having short attention spans is because we’ve taught them spending one second on something is the way to go through many pages of search results, endlessly scroll in Facebook, Imgur or Reddit, swipe left up down whatever. We’ve conditioned them to consume great quantities of nothing. Change my mind...

  • You mean, the app will make me organize my sock drawer for three hours and forget to eat?

  • I must admit I’m a bit skeptical but hopeful after reading this. It’s true that we aren’t being challenged in many of the ways we used to be (like reading great literature...or maybe just reading books at all.) but glad to know there’s an app for that.

  • Well, low focus is a fact. While it is necessary to look for answers “why” and review the mistakes of the past, we need a painkiller on the way... like now. The question is if an app and this app is this painkiller...

  • On the one hand this seems like a potentially very useful application of technology - to increase our ability to concentrate, a truly important function. On the other hand, could we not turn to methods with more longitudinal testing, like the meditation practices developed over thousands of years, rather then more screen time?

  • Most brain training has been seen as scams with limited results. Lumosity is a perfect example, after settling for $2 million for false advertising, continues to claim benefits for their product, with limited scientific evidence. If, however, this research starts to prove true, backed by science, this could be a game changer.