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Steve Jobs Never Wanted Us to Use Our iPhones Like This

By The New York Times

The devices have become our constant companions. This was not the planRead full story

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  • A lot of my research and learning experience I get done thru my iPhone. I no longer have piles of magazines and most books are ebooks.

    But I can confirm that I also put a limit on my notifications and the documentation of what I do in my life. I don’t enjoy sharing everything and relying so much on

    A lot of my research and learning experience I get done thru my iPhone. I no longer have piles of magazines and most books are ebooks.

    But I can confirm that I also put a limit on my notifications and the documentation of what I do in my life. I don’t enjoy sharing everything and relying so much on the need of the virtual companionship that so many others do.

  • Here’s an interesting view about the iPhone from Cal Newport, and one that I had some affinity for. However, I’ve often thought when I have these desires for simpler experiences, I’m lacking imagination or understanding of other people’s needs. (I once argued against phones having cameras for simplicity

    Here’s an interesting view about the iPhone from Cal Newport, and one that I had some affinity for. However, I’ve often thought when I have these desires for simpler experiences, I’m lacking imagination or understanding of other people’s needs. (I once argued against phones having cameras for simplicity reasons.) it seems that no one team can really conceive of the complete experience of a general purpose device, which is what the phone became: a handheld, connected, touch- (and voice-) based computer.

    The recommendations about turning off notifications and making other changes to make sure your phone is working for you, instead of vice versa, make sense. But I think there is some conflict in the argument. As someone who travels frequently, I do much of my reading on an iPhone, iPad or Kindle, in spite of my strong preference for reading print newspapers and hardcover books. Curious to hear what others think? Can Newport’s recommendations gain adoption?

  • Counterpoint: the announcement of the App Store was later mentioned by Steve as the “second greatest accomplishment” of his career after the Mac...

    So unless the author has access to Steve through seances or other psychic methods, I’ll stick with the fact that he knew what it meant to have apps and a platform for developers...

  • The law of unintended consequences at work here as the iPhone as Jobs intended was to be “an iPod that made phone calls.” No app store, third party developers or digital distraction.

  • A sad story but reality with most things. Many things don’t happen the way you wished them.

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