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Anasticia Sholik

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Food cabals

SCOTUS update

The world's eyes are on a US child abduction case. The supreme court will decide how to apply international law in the case of a mother taking her daughter from Italy to the US to flee her allegedly abusive ex-husband.

A case about international child abduction law has the world watching SCOTUS

There is something especially heartening about a cross-cultural love story. It shows that humans are all essentially the same and that our differences are merely superficial.

But when love turns into hate and parents of differing nationalities break up, there's nothing more terrifying than the idea

There is something especially heartening about a cross-cultural love story. It shows that humans are all essentially the same and that our differences are merely superficial.

But when love turns into hate and parents of differing nationalities break up, there's nothing more terrifying than the idea that your once true love will take off with your child to another land.

This week the US Supreme Court will consider just such a horror story, the tale of a small child separated from her mother and at the center of an international custody dispute of global significance.

Trump and the courts

Objectivity is on trial in Trump's impeachment hearings. A republican congressman sought to undermine a panel of four legal experts by asking whether they voted for Donald Trump—attacking a core principle of the judiciary system that people can put biases aside and act impartially.

The concept of objectivity is under attack at the Trump impeachment hearings

On Wednesday I attended the hearing on constitutional grounds for impeachment of Donald Trump. It was a heartening affair because it shows a lively republic in pursuit of truth and it's always fun to see civics in action.

But it was disheartening because Republicans attacked the constitutional scholars

On Wednesday I attended the hearing on constitutional grounds for impeachment of Donald Trump. It was a heartening affair because it shows a lively republic in pursuit of truth and it's always fun to see civics in action.

But it was disheartening because Republicans attacked the constitutional scholars testifying, questioning their objectivity and suggesting that they could not possibly be unbiased if they didn't reveal how they voted in the last presidential elections. And with each observer they manage to convince of this impossibility, we all lose a little bit more.

Trump's taxes will stay secret, for now. Trump argues that, as the president, his financial records are special. Lower courts have disagreed—but the US Supreme Court has granted the president's legal team more time to work on their petition.

The Supreme Court grants Trump’s emergency stay in financial records case

US president Donald Trump yesterday got what he wanted from, of all people, Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The progressive jurist granted the Republican president's request for a stay that would suspend an order in a lower court allowing his financial records to be reviewed.

But RBG was't

US president Donald Trump yesterday got what he wanted from, of all people, Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The progressive jurist granted the Republican president's request for a stay that would suspend an order in a lower court allowing his financial records to be reviewed.

But RBG was't signaling her approval of Trump's legal stance, just giving him time to file a petition for review, and it happened to be her because the justices rotate duties with respect to emergency applications. Now the House of Representatives must respond by Dec. 11 and the justices will ultimately have to decide if they want to walk into this political landmine and accept review of three financial matters dealing with Trump's records and his claims the executive is special.

Metals.com scam

Amazon attrition

At the movies

Fashion forward

Reshaping society

Get smart about parenting

Raising a child is hard. But the “parenting is hard” trope, which feeds memes and dinner conversations, can be dangerous. It frames the problem as the individual failure of a single parent rather than as a social issue.

The hardest part of being a parent has nothing to do with raising kids

I always say we have to raise our girls to be brave, not perfect. But it's not enough for parents to try to do this work alone, we have to change as a society because our kids are getting messages from everywhere - media, school, classmates - so it's on all of us together.

See you later!

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We’re thinking about the fourth industrial revolution all wrong

Read more on Quartz

Contributions

  • It’s a bold idea to think that the era we are in right now could be the final stage of a grand process to automate all the tasks necessary to sustain a stable society. What will humans do with their newfound free time? If jobs are not the source of human dignity—what will be? The Fourth Industrial Revolution

    It’s a bold idea to think that the era we are in right now could be the final stage of a grand process to automate all the tasks necessary to sustain a stable society. What will humans do with their newfound free time? If jobs are not the source of human dignity—what will be? The Fourth Industrial Revolution could fundamentally change humanity—and our life aspirations. All revolutions are disruptive, and Industry 4.0 is certainly no exception.

  • Interesting view! Their is no doubt we are entering an era where we will all have more time for creativity and innovation as AI and robotics automate the intellectual and physical. I think as humans we will never be satisfied with sitting back and letting the machines do all the work though, rather the

    Interesting view! Their is no doubt we are entering an era where we will all have more time for creativity and innovation as AI and robotics automate the intellectual and physical. I think as humans we will never be satisfied with sitting back and letting the machines do all the work though, rather the opportunity is a whole new layer of economy based on creative ideation and innovative collaboration underpinned by what AI will do on our behalf.

  • This is exactly right. Life and work are not nearly as linear or planned as we like to think. Most startups we invest in and work with are focused on trying to create one type of new service or product using AI or blockchain or machine learning, not thinking about how their idea fits into a grand narrative

    This is exactly right. Life and work are not nearly as linear or planned as we like to think. Most startups we invest in and work with are focused on trying to create one type of new service or product using AI or blockchain or machine learning, not thinking about how their idea fits into a grand narrative. In real life and real time, stuff just happens and then we write about it years later in a way that makes it seem cohesive.

  • Perhaps it is time for universal basic income. Perhaps it is time for the poor to rise up by not consuming. What if all economic models started to consider that all we need is food, and the clothes and cars we already have. I want to see the chart of GDP in a world where people stop buying all the crap

    Perhaps it is time for universal basic income. Perhaps it is time for the poor to rise up by not consuming. What if all economic models started to consider that all we need is food, and the clothes and cars we already have. I want to see the chart of GDP in a world where people stop buying all the crap we don’t need. Instead of worrying that your job will be replaced by machines, worry that you don’t actually produce something that is NECESSARY. Who will care about efficiency when there is no demand?

  • Perhaps. Perhaps something quite different. A premise of their argument is that “intellectualism” is the highest progression of human output.

    I did quite enjoy their take. But don’t think intellectual thought is our highest level of output. There’s increasing demand for creative output. There’s increasing

    Perhaps. Perhaps something quite different. A premise of their argument is that “intellectualism” is the highest progression of human output.

    I did quite enjoy their take. But don’t think intellectual thought is our highest level of output. There’s increasing demand for creative output. There’s increasing use for judgement and creativity in intellectual output as well.

    And we, the humans, have unused mental capacity. If nothing in nature is by accident then this potential exists for a reason. Certainly we can step back and view history’s arc from several different perspectives. But one of our limitations is that we can only see back from today. At each bend of the arc those present couldn’t see at all where it headed.

    We stand, perhaps, at a similar juncture. We can see that history’s arc is bending into a new direction. But that direction doesn’t exist in our history- it is completely outside of any human frame of reference.

    But we have several common themes from these prior bends in history’s arc:

    Employment both changed and became equally or more plentiful despite increased productivity.

    We used more mental capacity after the bend than we did before.

    Employment became increasingly an activity of the head, but manual employment remained essential.

    We needed a lot more creation and managing activities for every new or scaled activity.

    It’s all going to be interesting. For centuries Mankind has thought they were on the verge of being able to sit back and reap the rewards of prior work with no present effort. And mankind probably hasn’t gotten any closer.

  • It is certainly a refreshing optimistic view, written by someone I would bet dollars to doughnuts is a Star Trek fan. Though what they’re not-so-subtly hinting towards is the creation of an economy of abundance. Namely whenever we construct something that will provide humans with every sophisticated

    It is certainly a refreshing optimistic view, written by someone I would bet dollars to doughnuts is a Star Trek fan. Though what they’re not-so-subtly hinting towards is the creation of an economy of abundance. Namely whenever we construct something that will provide humans with every sophisticated material whim possible, never using human labor, it is an opportunity to do those soul enriching things that many people never have a crack at.

    You can sign me up for that, however the piece deliberately overlooks the price exacted to arrive at such a utopia. We may be myopic standing amidst the grand human narrative, but people still need food, shelter, garments and purpose. If we are to make it to such a society as is described therein, it cannot yet again be on the backs of the middle class and working poor that will be the sacrificial lamb.

    Thats more than just cracking some eggs to make the omelette.

  • Great many insights in this article. I agree this 4th industrial revolution might be a continuation of the digital revolution. As any historian knows, you can’t call it history until 50 years have passed, it is called current events. We need to have 1-2 generations consider the choices and events as

    Great many insights in this article. I agree this 4th industrial revolution might be a continuation of the digital revolution. As any historian knows, you can’t call it history until 50 years have passed, it is called current events. We need to have 1-2 generations consider the choices and events as they unfold.

    While many are excited to be involved in the next new innovation, being released from physical labor and merging that with mental labor; does this also mean we are losing our identities as humans? If we are not working, collectively or independently, where do we get our identity from?

    I would like to propose that we need to find a way to be connected as a society now more than ever. Once we dehumanize each other, we begin to fall out of our connectedness; our sense of belonging. There is nothing more important to being human than knowing our identity.

  • The rise of automated intelligence may one day free us from the burden of labour. What will society look like, where all production is managed and carried out by machines? How will this impact the growing problems with capitalism and wealth disparity?

  • Great article. Thought provoking. A bit scary bc what will give humans purpose? What is going to happen to humanity? Afterall, we are still human. What happens to that piece?

  • We can be continuously uplifted by the thought of the fourth industrial era providing time for creativity. However, there are those that enjoy expressing their creativity in the midst of agricultural, iron forged tools, rebuilt and repurposed antique digital equipment. Many with genius level IQ scores

    We can be continuously uplifted by the thought of the fourth industrial era providing time for creativity. However, there are those that enjoy expressing their creativity in the midst of agricultural, iron forged tools, rebuilt and repurposed antique digital equipment. Many with genius level IQ scores choose not to study the sciences. Many future Americans may bend our history in unexpected ways. I think your views are narrowed by your careers. Let's think about what new science has done to help extend human life. I know someone with a 3D printed skin graph. No scars from a major burn accident!

    Now that is impressive.

  • Industry 4.0 is just the title of Klaus Schwab’s book. He’s the founder and Exec Chairman of the World Economic Forum in Davos. It isn’t representative of the changing realities in manufacturing and research. Positioning economic change as technological advancement is misleading and only helps business - not innovation.

  • Interesting concept - to throw the concept of industrialization on its head and look at it from a different perspective.

    It's interesting to think about the possibility that if were able to automate everything required for a stable society, do humans need to work at all?

  • You can see the dehumanization of production starting in the late 70’s when wage stopped rising with productivity and most of society hasn’t gotten a pay raise in 40 years since then, with all the gains going to the top.

    Before that point, computer systems were not in widespread use. The personal computer

    You can see the dehumanization of production starting in the late 70’s when wage stopped rising with productivity and most of society hasn’t gotten a pay raise in 40 years since then, with all the gains going to the top.

    Before that point, computer systems were not in widespread use. The personal computer and the modern spreadsheet hadn’t yet transformed business administration. The fax machine was just beginning to revolutionize communications.

    We are already half-way through this revolution which is why the bottom 60% are doing so much worse in terms of shared prosperity and income growth.

    Humans need work more than work needs people.

  • This is a paradigm shifting perspective on the future of “work”. Perhaps the cycle of “labor” has run its course and we are entering back into a cycle of hunting and gathering I.e. each day being a new adventure based on need, remote work, a 1099 structure, flexible hours based on the current need, a

    This is a paradigm shifting perspective on the future of “work”. Perhaps the cycle of “labor” has run its course and we are entering back into a cycle of hunting and gathering I.e. each day being a new adventure based on need, remote work, a 1099 structure, flexible hours based on the current need, a focus on personal value, protection of the self/home, etc. Is this the end of working for “the man”?

  • This is an interesting perspective on the future, the piece nicely discusses potential flaws in the linearly-extrapolated narrative about the future that seems to dominate the zeitgeist. The most important thing mentioned in the piece is that we can’t truly know what will happen until it has happened

    This is an interesting perspective on the future, the piece nicely discusses potential flaws in the linearly-extrapolated narrative about the future that seems to dominate the zeitgeist. The most important thing mentioned in the piece is that we can’t truly know what will happen until it has happened. Similarly, the discussion of possible outcomes at the end is a good start to thinking about this. The future could be similar or different, better or worse.

    Predicting it is impossible, but thinking about different futures isn’t, and that’s what makes preparation possible. We just have to recognize we might be wrong, and there are interactions and effects we can’t predict. I often think there is more emphasis on what new things will happen rather than on what foundational assumptions (that we think won’t change) could become untrue and have significant consequences.

  • Good insight-- and I agree that the longer view incorporating the full span of these transitions in human history may inform us more than the technology-centric approach.

    What visions like this often fail to address, however, is that each of the past transitions (certainly the Industrial Revolution

    Good insight-- and I agree that the longer view incorporating the full span of these transitions in human history may inform us more than the technology-centric approach.

    What visions like this often fail to address, however, is that each of the past transitions (certainly the Industrial Revolution, which we know the most about) generated massive externalities for the people who were caught in those transitions. Industrial employees faced deadly conditions for hundreds of years, and intense conflicts roiled the newly industrialist countries throughout that time period. The wars of 1848 in Europe and the American Civil War, for example, have direct ties to the agriculture/industry power shift. And more importantly, millions of people were hurt, dislocated, traumatized in the process of that transition.

    It looks like this transition will happen much faster than the agriculture/industry transition, which took hundreds of years. It's very appealing to envision a post-work, self-actualization era, but we have to figure out how to deal with the people who will be personally and collectively wrenched by the transitions. We don't have hundreds of years this time, we have more people who will be impacted and probably lose something they value, and we are more connected and better able to communicate and organize than at any time in the past. We have to start thinking about how to manage, mitigate the externalities of this shift if we want to have a chance of getting to that future.

  • I think we should reinvent the way we think... This is a great example of establishing a alternative narrative for what the future holds.

    "Perhaps we are not in a fourth industrial revolution that will simply progress the roles of humans in production. Perhaps we are in the final stages of a grand process

    I think we should reinvent the way we think... This is a great example of establishing a alternative narrative for what the future holds.

    "Perhaps we are not in a fourth industrial revolution that will simply progress the roles of humans in production. Perhaps we are in the final stages of a grand process to create and automate all the tasks necessary to sustain a stable society. Perhaps jobs are not the source of human dignity. Perhaps escape from the burden of labour is not unemployment, but freedom. Perhaps new economic models, like UBI variants, will arise to replace labour income. Perhaps we are not moving into a new era of human industrialization—perhaps we’re on the cusp of the dehumanization of industrialization."

  • One of society's main economic indicators has been the concept of fully employed workforce - production of goods and services. This has unfortunately led to the idea that if you are not working, you are not contributing to society.

    But what if contribution to society is not what is important, but quality

    One of society's main economic indicators has been the concept of fully employed workforce - production of goods and services. This has unfortunately led to the idea that if you are not working, you are not contributing to society.

    But what if contribution to society is not what is important, but quality of one's life instead.

    If as predicted the next Industrial revolution will shift the burdon of societal contribution in the form of production to machines and automation - the real benefit will be allowing humans to focus on living more fulfilled lives.

    As the author states in conclusion, "Perhaps escape from the burden of labour is not unemployment, but freedom."

    Perhaps the next Industrial revolution will be about providing more freedom to enjoy life more fully.

  • The two authors of this should seriously get an award ! This is a concise capsulation of industry & work through the ages, just exceptional. I’m an old coot now and I’m warning you hipsters becomin a coot happens fast !! I worked my proverbial ass off for 45 yrs, been retired 4 yrs. Dig this in relation

    The two authors of this should seriously get an award ! This is a concise capsulation of industry & work through the ages, just exceptional. I’m an old coot now and I’m warning you hipsters becomin a coot happens fast !! I worked my proverbial ass off for 45 yrs, been retired 4 yrs. Dig this in relation to you article , I sat on a stool with a protractor and an old Fountain Pen ( a stick) writing freehand the Axis & Prism on Glass lenses for your Eyeglasses and then Ground them by hand ! I had been thrown out of High School ( boring ) & kept falling in love ! Anyway I ended my career managing a large high tech lab & when I left it was pretty much totally Robotic. Learning to use a Computer at age 30 was INSANE ! I struggled with constant change, I’ll end this novel with one concern that made me want to make you two stand in the corner, I think “ work” in the traditional sense does have a dignity to it that helps both our character & humanity, the drudgery and the abuses & depressions & politics workin for the man it can bring are a huge bummer even though I hate to say this it brings a discipline that we as humans benefit from, but I really like the idea of being a bum too ! Which I think two are hinting is a good idea ? In 45 yrs I had about 5 sick days and my poor kids only got about 4 vacations. At one time I managed 110 bodies , I mean people. See what corporations do to a soul ! A friend once said to me “ Hey Nez your a prostitute ya know you sell your body & mind just like a Hooker to the company ! Ouch !! Have you too watched 60 Minutes on their look at AI ? Very good !!!! Check it out ! Your article here is the best !!!

  • Great article. It is not only how we work but also who works and how we consume. The writer offers an optimistic outlook and Ill take it!

  • Excellent article. My view of the future industrial revolution is not positive.

  • We think of it simply... Working Class jobs go the way of automation and robotics. Service Class jobs go the way of web services and bots. The only need for *most* human labor in the future is at the crossroads of creative problem solving and technical know how.

  • Strategic teams built around diverse backgrounds, ages, and skills is what comes to mind. Artists merging with scientists, linguists, poets, recreationalists, home specialists, etc... Any future brand is a lifestyle brand.

  • I cannot imagine the world my one year old grandson will not just see, but be a part of its creation. I hope we raise him to appreciate humankind and love his neighbor.

  • This is very thoughtful and fourth coming. This alternative view of industrialization, to me, tells a much clearer story of not just the dehumanizing of industrialization, but the of the evolution of the human society as a whole. The fourth revolution, much like the others which preceded it will forever

    This is very thoughtful and fourth coming. This alternative view of industrialization, to me, tells a much clearer story of not just the dehumanizing of industrialization, but the of the evolution of the human society as a whole. The fourth revolution, much like the others which preceded it will forever change societies form and purpose. The most tantalizing about this moment in history is that we may finally be free of labor and truly live as freely as we wish!

  • It will be human revolution if we keep going this way

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