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CEO corner

Why Nike selected a tech executive as its next CEO. The company has been investing heavily in tech and data analytics. It sees its new CEO leading it into a future focused on data-driven, direct-to-consumer sales.

Why Nike selected a tech executive as its next CEO

"Parker, who has been Nike's CEO since 2006 and has worked at the company for four decades, will become the company's executive chairman, according to the press release."

This is one of the most important parts; Nike needed Parker in some sort of capacity after he steps down as CEO for 13 years.

Why

"Parker, who has been Nike's CEO since 2006 and has worked at the company for four decades, will become the company's executive chairman, according to the press release."

This is one of the most important parts; Nike needed Parker in some sort of capacity after he steps down as CEO for 13 years.

Why?

Because Parker steered the company through countless potential disasters, from the gender discrimination mess in 2018 and the Kaepernick campaign backlash to their disservice to pregnant athletes. He didn't just address them; he fixed the problems, wiped out the bad actors, and managed to TRIPLE sales.

Parker is a heck of an architect.

Money, money, money

Live from the International Astronautical Congress

The business of travel

Marking 30 years of the web

The latest on Brexit

WeWork gets worse

SoftBank takes over WeWork. The board of the shared office company chose the Japanese conglomerate over a competing offer from JP Morgan, the Wall Street Journal reports. Co-founder Adam Neumann will lose control of WeWork—but get a $1.7 billion payout.

SoftBank to Boost Stake in WeWork in Deal That Cuts Most Ties With Neumann

Being a big fan of WeWork’s service, it is sad to see the devaluation hitting this level. Moreover, the payout to Adam N is beyond silly for a company that is going to need a major structural face lift.

WeWork is really a true unicorn: a creature that only was viable in the mind of Adam Neumann...

While I believe it might be possible to make the business model work through a greater focus on corporate customers, the governance and hubris on the company’s leadership and greedy backers quickly contributed

WeWork is really a true unicorn: a creature that only was viable in the mind of Adam Neumann...

While I believe it might be possible to make the business model work through a greater focus on corporate customers, the governance and hubris on the company’s leadership and greedy backers quickly contributed to unrealistic valuations.

And now SoftBank will have to live with the creature it helped create...

India's coal addiction

India’s hard push on renewables isn’t about climate change—yet. Quartz explores how India is meeting the challenge of providing increasing amounts of energy to its people while trying to lower its dependence on fossil fuels. ✦

India’s hard push on renewables isn’t about climate change—yet

Unlike the rest of the anglophilic world—Canada, the US, Australia, and the UK—India has never encountered a significant culture of climate-change denial. But the awareness of climate change in India hasn’t been high either. So the rise of renewables in India, which has been nothing short of spectacular

Unlike the rest of the anglophilic world—Canada, the US, Australia, and the UK—India has never encountered a significant culture of climate-change denial. But the awareness of climate change in India hasn’t been high either. So the rise of renewables in India, which has been nothing short of spectacular, has other motivations: from energy security to soft power.

Making immigration work

Time to get lost in a museum...

New York's MoMA has reopened and it's a whole new experience. After the 90-year old institution’s $450-million expansion, it’s now possible to get lost at the new “mega MoMA.” That’s a good thing.

It’s now possible to get lost at the new “mega MoMA.” That’s a good thing

MoMA used to be my favorite museum in New York and now it's my favorite by a long shot. Aside from a few placings that feel designed for content creation (👀 surrealist section), this expansion is forward-thinking and inspired.

... and come back soon

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U.S. Midwest Freezes, Australia Burns: This Is the Age of Weather Extremes

U.S. Midwest Freezes, Australia Burns: This Is the Age of Weather Extremes

Read more on The New York Times

From Our Members

  • From -27°C in Chicago to 46°C in Australia, climate change has already pushed the world into an age of extremes. And while extreme temperatures might be an uncomfortable inconvenience for developed communities with abundant air conditioning and insulated homes, they are potentially deadly for fragile

    From -27°C in Chicago to 46°C in Australia, climate change has already pushed the world into an age of extremes. And while extreme temperatures might be an uncomfortable inconvenience for developed communities with abundant air conditioning and insulated homes, they are potentially deadly for fragile and less-developed communities in the Sahel, the Middle East, and South Asia. As with terrorism and warfare, climate change will disproportionately harm the world’s poorest and most vulnerable communities, not just because they have fewer means to protect themselves from these extremes, but also because small changes in temperature, rainfall, or agricultural production could have devastating consequences for communities already living on the brink. No amount of climate denial can escape this hard reality.

  • Living in the upper Midwest, I woke up this morning seeing my thermometer showing -23 below, this is called winter here. It’s been about 23 years since we experienced this level of cold. So we know it’s possible, but it is not extraordinary.

  • In the 19th century the Thames froze over in the winter. Completely froze over. This happened 24 times from 1408 to 1814. Extreme weather is a part of being on this planet. One recorded time the Thames was frozen for two months. That’s two months. In London. The fact is, extreme weather is recorded as

    In the 19th century the Thames froze over in the winter. Completely froze over. This happened 24 times from 1408 to 1814. Extreme weather is a part of being on this planet. One recorded time the Thames was frozen for two months. That’s two months. In London. The fact is, extreme weather is recorded as far back as humans have tracked it. Beyond that we can tell some really bad things happened, but we aren’t sure what.

    So what is going on? No one can be certain, as we do not have enough data to truly comprehend what is occurring on our planet. A planet that is billions of years old.

    One thing is for certain, we need to prepare for weather extremes if history can be a judge, and help each other become prepared instead of pointing fingers.

  • Something tells me things are different and to deny that they are different would be a lie or at least delusional. “When something happens — whether it’s a cold snap, a wildfire, a hurricane, any of those things — we need to think beyond what we have seen in the past and assume there’s a high probability

    Something tells me things are different and to deny that they are different would be a lie or at least delusional. “When something happens — whether it’s a cold snap, a wildfire, a hurricane, any of those things — we need to think beyond what we have seen in the past and assume there’s a high probability that it will be worse than anything we’ve ever seen,” said Crystal A. Kolden, an associate professor at the University of Idaho, who specializes in wildfires and who is currently working in Tasmania during one of the state’s worst fire seasons.”

  • If the long term damage done to our planet isn’t enough to move you, let’s look at the costs of increasing natural disasters.

    In 2018, natural disasters cost the world $160bn—down from the near record cost of damage in 2017, $360bn, but still much higher than the long-term average of $140bn.

    Of that

    If the long term damage done to our planet isn’t enough to move you, let’s look at the costs of increasing natural disasters.

    In 2018, natural disasters cost the world $160bn—down from the near record cost of damage in 2017, $360bn, but still much higher than the long-term average of $140bn.

    Of that $160bn, roughly $80bn was caused from just FOUR events in the United States.

    PG&E just went bankrupt for the second time in 11 years due to wildfires in California. If you don’t care about protecting our planet, at least care about protecting your wallet.

  • The cold rushing down from the Arctic, is normal pattern and has occurred many times in our history. Keep climate change Germaine to the argument, don’t clutter it with false anomalies.

  • And admist this the US president tweets a joke about global warming.

  • Just finished up a two day workshop with a bunch of people where the topic had a pretty significant climate change element. An 11 year old Native American boy who had tagged along with his dad put down his phone, joined a team, rolled up his sleeves and got to solutioning. He’s only 11 but knows there’s no time to waste.

  • David Milliband, in the Midwest we call -27C (-16F) in the winter a Wednesday. It's been like that for centuries.

  • The climate is an excellent example of a complex system, and when we add human behavior into the system picture, it’s even more complex. Quite simply, these weather phenomena (to the degree that they’re caused by climate change) illustrate why it can be a good idea to make interventions slowly in complex

    The climate is an excellent example of a complex system, and when we add human behavior into the system picture, it’s even more complex. Quite simply, these weather phenomena (to the degree that they’re caused by climate change) illustrate why it can be a good idea to make interventions slowly in complex systems—we don’t know all of the possible effects, primary, secondary, tertiary or beyond. Rather than thinking something won’t matter, could a better approach be minimizing and monitoring any impact we have?

  • We should be ready to embrace the change, help the ones who need and protect the planet.

  • Climate change is always occurring, if it didn’t warm up most of Canada would be under a thousand feet of ice! The biggest reason for the value of damage due to weather is we keep building near areas that can be damaged by fire by floods and high winds. In southern Alberta we’ve always had strong west

    Climate change is always occurring, if it didn’t warm up most of Canada would be under a thousand feet of ice! The biggest reason for the value of damage due to weather is we keep building near areas that can be damaged by fire by floods and high winds. In southern Alberta we’ve always had strong west winds do we build accordingly and can withstand 100 mph winds with little damage. We as humans have always adapted and we will always adapt to our surrounds as we must to survive !!!

  • Climate changes is a natural course of adjustment and man shouldn't interfere with it's development!

  • The onboard computer in my car froze solid today in Chiberia. The cold has been brutal.

  • This is only the beginning. You are going to see much extreme weather in the future.

  • This is no longer a matter of opinion, even if many still keep playing like the Titanic orchestra. The insurance industry knows better than anyone that the frequency and strength of extreme weather events is rapidly increasing.

  • https://scijinks.gov/polar-vortex/

    I'm not denying any form of climate change but the cold weather in the USA is nothing new.

  • Similar temps are on the books from 2 decades (or more) ago. So has climate change been on hold? Here at home I've seen summer high temp records older than 20 years stand. The human impact on the climate back then isn't even considered on today's forcasting models.

    There was no hysteria driving all this

    Similar temps are on the books from 2 decades (or more) ago. So has climate change been on hold? Here at home I've seen summer high temp records older than 20 years stand. The human impact on the climate back then isn't even considered on today's forcasting models.

    There was no hysteria driving all this fake news back then.

    P.S. Ian, PG&E declared bankruptcy to protect themselves from litigation in The Great California Republic of Victims. A legal move that has nothing to do with climate.

  • No one can deny that something is wrong. They just don’t know exactly what and who is to blame.

  • In Japan, this year I don’t feel such climate changes.

  • It has become truly Chiberia.

  • We can expect only more of this...

  • Some people are not going to survive this

  • I fear we, as a species

    , have come to a cusp, a tipping point. With all the research I read I fear we might be too late to save humanity. We live in an exponential growth of greed unlike anything civilization has ever faced and we seem to be losing.

  • I live on the Mississippi we will have serious flooding in the spring from all this flooding

  • I just think it's laughable when a large number of scientists quote data that's only been collected for the past 200 year's as empirical evidence.

    And how can they possibly say that airborne carbon levels are the highest that they've been in 80,000 year's?

    I definitely believe that our planet is on

    I just think it's laughable when a large number of scientists quote data that's only been collected for the past 200 year's as empirical evidence.

    And how can they possibly say that airborne carbon levels are the highest that they've been in 80,000 year's?

    I definitely believe that our planet is on a cycle where temperatures are warming. And I believe we need to act in dramatic ways. Just like population control. (which I personally believe it's a much bigger issue- but it's very non-PC)

    I just balk at the notion that we even have a glimpse at the cycles that our miraculous planet undergoes.

  • What a load! I didn’t know wrapping fish was so political.

  • -53F is January in the Dakotas. It’s why I moved west!

  • Global Warming brings global weather weirding!

  • The higher cost is because there is so much more human construction where weather calamities occur. More stuff = more stuff to get damaged = higher cost. It's not worse, just more great inconvenience.

  • It surely wouldn't have anything to do with how the earth rotates around the sun now, would it? Think northern and southern hemisheres and which hemisphere is closer to the sun. I mean, yes, those are extremely cold and wsrm temperatures but these are very short term situations. When these extreme temps

    It surely wouldn't have anything to do with how the earth rotates around the sun now, would it? Think northern and southern hemisheres and which hemisphere is closer to the sun. I mean, yes, those are extremely cold and wsrm temperatures but these are very short term situations. When these extreme temps last for weeks at a time, then maybe I'll listen to your "global warming" theories.

  • I recall January 1965 St. Paul Minnesota when the high temp did not go above 0 for a week or more. I skipped class a lot that week.

  • Wow

  • Climate Change.

  • A notice to all the armchair climatologist. Its settled science. But yes you dont determine it based on 1 weather event were having now.

  • lol wtf