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Events Are the New Magazines

Events Are the New Magazines

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Contributions

  • I think this is a rare time when the Quartz commentators got it very, very wrong: events are actually highly scaleable. Speakers will increasingly participate for free, almost all of the logistics are getter cheaper each year, and you don’t need all that many people to attend to make a profit. Like any

    I think this is a rare time when the Quartz commentators got it very, very wrong: events are actually highly scaleable. Speakers will increasingly participate for free, almost all of the logistics are getter cheaper each year, and you don’t need all that many people to attend to make a profit. Like any business, you have to run it correctly, but that isn’t new news.

  • Its not a new idea many eg @FortuneMagazine have been doing this for a long time. When you cant monetize your core business u look elsewhere & and then everyone jumps on the bandwagon at that point it's over saturated. We need better innovation than events & billionaire owners.

  • Brilliant headline! Trend is not new. And as everyone is noting events are super resource intensive. Other little-discussed problem is events businesses sometimes require journalists to be in cozy proximity to problematic people and entities, such as authoritarian regimes in China and Mideast, who fund the events.

  • deceptively non-scaleable as a business, however

  • It was difficult to sift through the torrent of names dropped in this article to understand the analogy between magazines and events.

    As far as I can tell, this can be summarized as "if you are smart you can transfer your skill set, and If you can book the right celebrities, brands will pay you."

    It was difficult to sift through the torrent of names dropped in this article to understand the analogy between magazines and events.

    As far as I can tell, this can be summarized as "if you are smart you can transfer your skill set, and If you can book the right celebrities, brands will pay you."

    I do love that Jonah Hill though. So hot right now!

  • I go to a lot of conferences. The secret sauce is making the attendees feel special for being there. If you feel that way, you’ll justify the cost however you need to: marketing, comms, business development. The good event organizers are those who maximize revenue and yet convey an aura of exclusivity.

  • For almost 20 years I experienced all shifts of magazines in Europe, from the golden years to the decline. Events functioning well doing does not mean that the magazines will die. Magazines will stay alive, as long as they have stories to tell to the readers, as long as they offer food for thought than

    For almost 20 years I experienced all shifts of magazines in Europe, from the golden years to the decline. Events functioning well doing does not mean that the magazines will die. Magazines will stay alive, as long as they have stories to tell to the readers, as long as they offer food for thought than articles related to advertisers.

  • Yes. The future of idea exchange. Doesn’t get more real time.

  • As noted by others, this model is non scaleable. That means that scaling it up would range from difficult and expensive to impossible. There are only so many big name or up in coming celebrities to go around. The problems go deeper though, these private events constitute a retraction of outreach, magazines

    As noted by others, this model is non scaleable. That means that scaling it up would range from difficult and expensive to impossible. There are only so many big name or up in coming celebrities to go around. The problems go deeper though, these private events constitute a retraction of outreach, magazines looking to an increasingly specific audience and pool of funding. With that in mind, I hope that this model does not spread to other businesses.

  • ...except they’re not new and they are nothing like magazines as they are exclusive and narrow cast. But otherwise...

  • This is not scalable, it only works in very limited markets, and what repeat “customers” could you expect? Also, who will publicize this for free—after the first event or two, you’re on your own, and I wouldn’t expect strong word of mouth. This is an extension; the headline is terrible.

  • I've definitely been seeing this as of late—from the small gay male magazine in Brooklyn to banner regional and national magazines. I think they're pretty cool and bring out a different crowd, having attended some. But do they have sustainability?

  • Interesting. I’d say Podcasts...