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The cheapest Chinese electric cars are coming to the US and Europe—for as little as $9,000

By Quartz

China already sells more electric vehicles than the rest of the world combined. And there’s a long list of the categories you can choose from—includingRead full story

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  • Faraday Future is a cautionary tale of how difficult the U.S. market is to enter for a Chinese electric car maker. First, competing against Tesla is really difficult. Tesla has built a massive infrastructure of super chargers all over the U.S. Faraday Future has recently laid off a lot of their employees

    Faraday Future is a cautionary tale of how difficult the U.S. market is to enter for a Chinese electric car maker. First, competing against Tesla is really difficult. Tesla has built a massive infrastructure of super chargers all over the U.S. Faraday Future has recently laid off a lot of their employees.

    People don’t want electric vehicles that just so happen to be good, they want good cars that just so happen to be electric vehicles.

  • China sells nearly 2 million tiny electric cars already (and 1 million normal electric cars). It was just a matter of time before these tiny cars became available outside China. Kaiyun Motors is courageously taking the leap, and their market surveys over the past few years say that there is a market

    China sells nearly 2 million tiny electric cars already (and 1 million normal electric cars). It was just a matter of time before these tiny cars became available outside China. Kaiyun Motors is courageously taking the leap, and their market surveys over the past few years say that there is a market for these. Interesting times for the global auto industry.

  • I believe that Gen Z adults will buy them as they are cheaper than US or European produced vehicles and at $9,000 why not for a first car or truck purchase. To be sold in US they will be required to meet certain safety standards and will need compatibility with US and European auto and truck makers

    I believe that Gen Z adults will buy them as they are cheaper than US or European produced vehicles and at $9,000 why not for a first car or truck purchase. To be sold in US they will be required to meet certain safety standards and will need compatibility with US and European auto and truck makers. I like the idea of competition and competition based on price would be good. Again, I repeat they must meet safety standards and ease of recharging.

  • Many true innovations look ridiculous at first—these vehicles look like a case study from Christiansen's Innovator's Dilemma. Remember: hydraulics, micro hard drives, and 8-bit microprocessors all seemed ridiculous until they grew up into hydraulic backhoes, the iPod, and the PC. Perhaps we shouldn't

    Many true innovations look ridiculous at first—these vehicles look like a case study from Christiansen's Innovator's Dilemma. Remember: hydraulics, micro hard drives, and 8-bit microprocessors all seemed ridiculous until they grew up into hydraulic backhoes, the iPod, and the PC. Perhaps we shouldn't be thinking of these as competing with cars but as a platform for what else they could become?

  • China has the global lead in electric vehicles, and the moment when it starts hitting US and European markets with them is overdue. This is a small, but perhaps important step toward that changing.

  • We don’t actually call them cars here. We already have golf carts with pickup bodies, not a new concept. Asinine to compare them to an F150. Compare them to a gator, absolutely. F150, not in the same league or market.

  • While I get demand for cheaper electric / carbon free vehicles is rising, I’m curious how this plays into a culture that is moving away from ownership and more towards ride hail/less ownership models. Especially in our largest cities where we are trying to reduce traffic and congestion. Cheap electric

    While I get demand for cheaper electric / carbon free vehicles is rising, I’m curious how this plays into a culture that is moving away from ownership and more towards ride hail/less ownership models. Especially in our largest cities where we are trying to reduce traffic and congestion. Cheap electric vehicles flooding the market may convert more folks away from gas vehicles but could also have other unintended consequences.

  • Although it seems a given that Chinese electric vehicles will flood onto US streets, it reads more like science fiction when the comparison here implies US farmers replacing their Ford f-150's with Chinese electric alternatives

  • I stopped reading after the article said the truck's top speed is 28 mph. Plus it's made in China. That's a hard pass for me.

  • How many people think Americans will buy a vehicle with a top speed of 28 miles per hour? When I was a kid I had a moped that could go faster than that.

  • I want one! For getting around Annapolis ... evenings, weekends, all summer long. But not the commute to Washington DC (= death trap)

  • They look about as safe as a matchbox cars. As a mother of a daughter who was ran over by a semi truck I think I will pass.

  • Great idea, more for different type of audience and generation who like to try new things, dont want to spend much money on ownership and environment conscious.

  • China continues to play on a strategy that has served them well for decades - push highly affordable, cheaply made products to a mass market and then work up the value chain from there. It's worked before on toasters and TVs so why not on electric cars.

  • I drive a Nissan Titan that gets 14mpg. I live in a twin-cities community of 250,000, in a part of town that's no more than twenty miles from virtually every other part of town. My wife drives a newer model Highlander that we use when the entire family goes out together.

    I wanted to reduce my footprint

    I drive a Nissan Titan that gets 14mpg. I live in a twin-cities community of 250,000, in a part of town that's no more than twenty miles from virtually every other part of town. My wife drives a newer model Highlander that we use when the entire family goes out together.

    I wanted to reduce my footprint and use less gas but an accident I had a few years back meant no more bicycles and besides, it rains a good eight months out of the year where I live in Oregon. Even so I paid $2,400 for a high end electric scooter (picture Europe) that I planned to use from July through October, only to learn that they're not allowed in our bike lanes where I'd planned to ride it, and they can't be licensed for the street.

    Millions of people across the country like me could get by just fine with an electric vehicle like this as a second car.

    I wouldn't hesitate for a moment to buy one -- once I was assured they were legal where I live.

    For Sale: Virtually new Electric Scooter (picture Europe) with an eighty mile range; top speed of 38 mph; charges fully in standard 120 volt outlet in eight hours. 😊

  • These make sense for urban-only personal driving or for municipal/fleet purposes....but with top speeds of 40 miles and ranges off around 120, they're not *really* cars.... thanks

  • Coming to a Florida retirement community near you

  • The soon-to-hit-the-market electric version of the F150 is going to start at $70 k (vs. $28k for the gasoline version)?

    No thanks.

  • Most Americans would not take this vehicle as a replacement to American trucks.

  • I am curious how well this will sell and where.

  • These will never catch on in America, not in a big way at least. They're more like enclosed golf carts than actual cars. Urban Europe, though, I could see, but they'd still be up against a very established market.

  • Great news, finally a credible announcement about an alternative to the internal combustion engine. How long before GM makes its own announcement about a h-way ready electric car and truck?

  • These Mini-electric vehicles can be more than enough to meet our needs if their forma conform well to our life styles. I'd like to watch over the fate.

  • Point A to Point B and a little extra. That's all I need. Bigger not always better and does not necessarily mean safer. That is the driver, not the vehicle. I am not sure if the F-150 commenters get the article, the little truck putt-putts are not meant to replace these big ego vehicles (I mean that

    Point A to Point B and a little extra. That's all I need. Bigger not always better and does not necessarily mean safer. That is the driver, not the vehicle. I am not sure if the F-150 commenters get the article, the little truck putt-putts are not meant to replace these big ego vehicles (I mean that as I know a few people who own them, but never use them for anything work or "heavy duty" related). Point A to Point B, ego checked at the door.

  • Yes. The answer is yes, we will. Above all, Americans are cheap. We don't care about anything or anyone except ourselves and we're hypocrites. We'll love this truck.

  • Urban transportation for retirees. It challenges the golf cart market because it can carry more. Price-wise, I'm not sure how it compares to golf carts.

  • Crazy tiny little golf carts vs Americans. Let’s see how the future lands in the American heartlands

  • I think this is perfect timing. Over the past several years the US auto market has moved away from compact trucks and into midsized vehicles but these midsized items are just too much truck and too expensive for many of us. I can’t wait to check one of these out in person.

  • Vv. Kll

  • I believe the point to be taken is China builds and sells more electric vehicles than any other country. That alone speaks volumes and warrants paying attention.

  • Holy cow 🐄

  • I always reduce those MPG estimates etc by 20%

  • I wonder what the "with doors" option costs.

  • Nice affirdable clean cars

  • Never, I mean , never.

  • And why? Toyota Prius

  • Golf carts are fun

  • Need a new truck?

  • Who is talking about the disposal of the batteries

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