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India's coal addiction

What makes coal so dirty? It’s a crucial question, given that without cutting its use drastically, the world won’t hit its greenhouse gas emissions targets. Quartz reporter Akshat explains the trouble with the sedimentary rock, which India uses for 55% of its energy. ✦

The science of what makes coal so dirty

Coal's many sins shouldn't be used to forget the value it has offered to humanity. Coal powered the industrial revolution and it continues to pull people out of poverty in much of the world. During the 17th and 18th centuries, coal helped create the carbon-based branch of chemistry we call "organic chemistry,

Coal's many sins shouldn't be used to forget the value it has offered to humanity. Coal powered the industrial revolution and it continues to pull people out of poverty in much of the world. During the 17th and 18th centuries, coal helped create the carbon-based branch of chemistry we call "organic chemistry," which I studied to gain my PhD from the University of Oxford. Organic chemists have won one in five of all Nobel Prizes in chemistry awarded over the last 120 years.

India’s hard push on renewables isn’t about climate change—yet. Quartz explores how India is meeting the challenge of providing increasing amounts of energy to its people while trying to lower its dependence on fossil fuels. ✦

India’s hard push on renewables isn’t about climate change—yet

Unlike the rest of the anglophilic world—Canada, the US, Australia, and the UK—India has never encountered a significant culture of climate-change denial. But the awareness of climate change in India hasn’t been high either. So the rise of renewables in India, which has been nothing short of spectacular

Unlike the rest of the anglophilic world—Canada, the US, Australia, and the UK—India has never encountered a significant culture of climate-change denial. But the awareness of climate change in India hasn’t been high either. So the rise of renewables in India, which has been nothing short of spectacular, has other motivations: from energy security to soft power.

China's tech darlings

India's online marketplace

Different kinds of jobs

Why Nike selected a tech executive as its next CEO. The company has been investing heavily in tech and data analytics. It sees its new CEO leading it into a future focused on data-driven, direct-to-consumer sales.

Why Nike selected a tech executive as its next CEO

"Parker, who has been Nike's CEO since 2006 and has worked at the company for four decades, will become the company's executive chairman, according to the press release."

This is one of the most important parts; Nike needed Parker in some sort of capacity after he steps down as CEO for 13 years.

Why

"Parker, who has been Nike's CEO since 2006 and has worked at the company for four decades, will become the company's executive chairman, according to the press release."

This is one of the most important parts; Nike needed Parker in some sort of capacity after he steps down as CEO for 13 years.

Why?

Because Parker steered the company through countless potential disasters, from the gender discrimination mess in 2018 and the Kaepernick campaign backlash to their disservice to pregnant athletes. He didn't just address them; he fixed the problems, wiped out the bad actors, and managed to TRIPLE sales.

Parker is a heck of an architect.

This is a very interesting move. It just goes to show that the biggest companies on the planet are all actually tech companies today - whether you realize it or not...

Money, money, money

Lawmakers move to make it much harder to launder money in the US. A bill looking to dent America’s status as the world’s biggest tax haven—by forcing owners of US firms to disclose identities to law enforcement—passed a vote in the House.

Lawmakers move to make it much harder to launder money in the US

This is pretty big from the White House: "The bill got a late boost today when the White House commended it, saying it 'represents important progress in strengthening national security, supporting law enforcement, and clarifying regulatory requirements.'"

And if you haven't yet, definitely read colleague

This is pretty big from the White House: "The bill got a late boost today when the White House commended it, saying it 'represents important progress in strengthening national security, supporting law enforcement, and clarifying regulatory requirements.'"

And if you haven't yet, definitely read colleague Max de Haldevang's deep dive (Quartz member exclusive) into the United States as the world's largest tax haven: https://qz.com/1593317/welcome-to-the-worlds-biggest-tax-haven-the-usa/

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The World Might Actually Run Out of People

The World Might Actually Run Out of People

Read more on WIRED

From Our Members

  • Makes a lot of sense. Interesting to see how the U.N. projections aren’t good at all - really shows how far off we can be when we attribute quality on the basis of the source.

  • Behind the scary title there are some really positive messages here. We are living in a world that is increasingly connected, informed and educated through mobile connectivity and information sharing empowering far more with choice and options! The days are limited where we will see impoverished rural

    Behind the scary title there are some really positive messages here. We are living in a world that is increasingly connected, informed and educated through mobile connectivity and information sharing empowering far more with choice and options! The days are limited where we will see impoverished rural populations placing there only hope of survival in having as many children as possible - there are other alternatives becoming accessible now!

  • Very interesting article! The book referenced in the story is one that is now on my reading list. Never thought that there would be the possibility of population declines.

  • This is good news, we will continue to make wiser and more precise choices about reproduction. This leads to fewer, more capable humans, not more, nearly worthless ones. For most of human history our best bet for survival was to expand the population, there’s no reason to assume this will always be our best strategy though.

  • Sometimes projections have difficulty finding reality. Here there is little if any substance to the supporting data, I also think the hypothesis error potential is very high...

  • Interesting article. I did find it somewhat humorous that they referred to the UN as “respected.” I guess it depends on who you talk to. I’m looking forward to reading the book.

  • Interesting article!