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Red states will suffer the most from climate change

By The Outline

Conservative voters have good reason to push for climate change mitigation; too bad time is running out for them to acknowledge itRead full story

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  • The issue here is that many of these Southern towns and cities along the gulf coast are dependent on these energy and chemical plants for practically everything.. They offer high paying jobs. Usually, they're the best or only jobs available to people with a deficit in education.

    It's like the miners. Generations of families all work for the local plant. Their entire existence revolve around those jobs. Local restaurants, clothing store, etc. They all depend on those workers having money to spend

    The issue here is that many of these Southern towns and cities along the gulf coast are dependent on these energy and chemical plants for practically everything.. They offer high paying jobs. Usually, they're the best or only jobs available to people with a deficit in education.

    It's like the miners. Generations of families all work for the local plant. Their entire existence revolve around those jobs. Local restaurants, clothing store, etc. They all depend on those workers having money to spend.

    First:

    How would we be able to help every employee get a new green job? Which companies would move in and take the mantle?

    The whole system in these places, from government to local small business are surviving by way of these companies. What would happen if they went away?

    There has to be a plan that includes this huge problem as a top priority. We can expect some people will be left behind as the plants close down. But, we can't just tell them we're closing shop and "youre on your own" . We'd have to make it law that they close , or evolve into a green energy company somehow. And we'd have to have a reeducation, retraining plan for the workers. The people will need to be reassured that their lives won't be completely disrupted... Or you might have a revolution/civil war on your hands.

    That would be dangerous, foolish, and irresponsible . So, what do we do?

    The entire country runs on dirty energy. Some climate scientists say there's about 25 years before many of those gulf states will be up to their necks in water. Time isn't on our side.

    And worse yet, those chemical plants will be under water too. That raises a big question as to why they aren't being closed immediately. ... Before it turns into an irreversible nightmare.

    Disasters on top of disasters on top of disasters await if some thing isn't done right away. Not 2024. Not a decade from now.

    That means, the next president MUST believe the scientists. Even more important, he or she must be able to act fast. We hear Trump wants to declare a national emergency for his imagined invasion at the southern border. This may be a tactic the next president could use to insist on changes that would otherwise be extended into years of fighting (think healthcare) happen, or begin the process, on day one.

    (Note: I'm having trouble writing in this small text box. I hope it makes sense. Next time, I'll use a note taking app,copy and paste. Or better yet, do it on my PC instead of my phone)

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