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Zack Rosebrugh

Good morning.

Electric cars make their mark

2019 was the year electric vehicles grew up. From budget Kias to fleets of e-trucks, this was the biggest year for vehicular electrification yet—but several blockbuster launches belie a hard road ahead as automakers are forced to reinvent themselves.

2019 was the year electric cars grew up

Tesla flexed its muscle in the market even as overall EV sales softened. Global automakers have committed $225 billion toward electrification -- well past the point of no return despite 2019's worrying dip in EV sales (at least for cars not built by Tesla). Overall, it was the year things got serious

Tesla flexed its muscle in the market even as overall EV sales softened. Global automakers have committed $225 billion toward electrification -- well past the point of no return despite 2019's worrying dip in EV sales (at least for cars not built by Tesla). Overall, it was the year things got serious for EVs.Tesla has done the yeoman's work of proving you can sell a million or so electric cars to the masses. Its Model 3 accounted for 1 out of every 6 EVs sold worldwide. Now VW, GM, Ford, and others have painted a giant target on Tesla's back. Let the race begin.

Record low unemployment

Americans locked up abroad

Canopy branches out

The future of finance

Solving the climate crisis

The way we colonize Mars says a lot about how we address climate change. Is repeating our mistakes on another planet the answer to our existential crises?

The problems we’re solving for on Earth will only follow us to Mars

The most important sentence in this article for me is: “Imagine all the things we could do on Earth if we allocated an extra $22.6 billion to addressing climate change on our own planet?”.

Space exploration has undoubtedly kickstarted a raft of technological innovations we’ve all benefited from (insulin

The most important sentence in this article for me is: “Imagine all the things we could do on Earth if we allocated an extra $22.6 billion to addressing climate change on our own planet?”.

Space exploration has undoubtedly kickstarted a raft of technological innovations we’ve all benefited from (insulin pumps, solar cells, artificial limbs to name a few). So in my mind, it’s only worth spending all this money on getting to and living on Mars, if in doing so, we develop technology that also helps us solve all our very real problems here on Earth.

Get smart about parenting

Raising a child is hard. But the “parenting is hard” trope, which feeds memes and dinner conversations, can be dangerous. It frames the problem as the individual failure of a single parent rather than as a social issue.

The hardest part of being a parent has nothing to do with raising kids

I always say we have to raise our girls to be brave, not perfect. But it's not enough for parents to try to do this work alone, we have to change as a society because our kids are getting messages from everywhere - media, school, classmates - so it's on all of us together.

How Gen Z is changing Tinder

Disrupting dementia

Next-generation dementia care could learn from cancer care. Palliative care helps patients in their final months, and is often used for people suffering from end-stage cancer. But it can actually help anyone who has a long-term, chronic illness, and it could be especially effective for people living with dementia. ✦

Next-generation dementia care could learn a lesson from cancer care

In the 1950s, a single British physician named Cicely Saunders championed a new kind of care for terminally-ill cancer patients. She found that relieving pain and suffering made them happier—and ironically, live longer, even if drugs couldn't actually treat their condition.

That was the birth of hospice

In the 1950s, a single British physician named Cicely Saunders championed a new kind of care for terminally-ill cancer patients. She found that relieving pain and suffering made them happier—and ironically, live longer, even if drugs couldn't actually treat their condition.

That was the birth of hospice, which is a form of palliative care for the last six months of a person's life. Hospice, however, is a form of palliative care, which in general just means person-centered care. Sometimes, this means using life-saving interventions, like antibiotics for an infection. Other times, it means just making sue the person is comfortable. It depends on what the person and their caregivers want.

Palliative care could save dementia care, which is the more expensive in the last five years of life than cancer and heart disease. It could also save health care in general; it's cheaper than the current care systems in place. The trouble is, because it was historically used for cancer treatment, that's how most doctors think of it. Luckily, a few hospitals are testing out palliative care. If their results are good, it could expand nation-wide.

The rising price of immigration

The sole airline willing to deport high-risk immigrants is price-gouging ICE. There is only one carrier willing to take on US deportation flights and they're charging the US government nearly double the normal price, making flights as expensive as $33,500 per hour in November.

Sole airline willing to deport high-risk immigrants is price-gouging ICE

A basic lesson in supply and demand, as seen through the lens of ICE Air ops in an unredacted ICE document we obtained. ICE can only obtain the Boeing 767s required for its so-called SHRC (special high-risk charter) flights from one company in the entire country, because it's the only firm willing to

A basic lesson in supply and demand, as seen through the lens of ICE Air ops in an unredacted ICE document we obtained. ICE can only obtain the Boeing 767s required for its so-called SHRC (special high-risk charter) flights from one company in the entire country, because it's the only firm willing to take the contract for fear of negative press. But last month, those 767s were tied up with other, richer customers (i.e. the Dept. of Defense). So ICE was forced to take whatever the carrier offered—a 777 that was a couple of hundred seats bigger than what ICE needed, and double the price: $33,000/flight hr vs $17,000/flight hr. The company knows it's the only game in town and has no incentive to meet ICE halfway, according to ICE's primary charter broker, explaining why it can't put any pressure on the subcontractor to come down on its rate.

Every now and then, my faith is restored that the markets really know how to do their job. I'll use this as a lesson tonight to teach my kid the basics about supply and demand, and about how actions have consequences.

This is a super illuminating piece that shows the complexity of immigration control, public protest, and the business of deportation. Because ICE has garnered so much criticism few companies want to risk a public backlash and run the agency's charters. In fact, only one does it, which means it can charge

This is a super illuminating piece that shows the complexity of immigration control, public protest, and the business of deportation. Because ICE has garnered so much criticism few companies want to risk a public backlash and run the agency's charters. In fact, only one does it, which means it can charge whatever it wants.

Justin shows here how much this lack of competition is costing US taxpayers. It doesn't mean we should support all of ICE's activities but it does expose a dark side to an already dark law enforcement project.

The real life Irishman

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Your Company Wants to Know if You’ve Lost Weight

Your Company Wants to Know if You’ve Lost Weight

Read more on The Wall Street Journal

Contributions

  • I got $50 today at work for keeping below my starting weight 12 weeks ago! Independent nutritionist came in a few times, for anyone who wanted to participate. No real contest except with your own self.

  • Appreciating the obvious needs for more robust and considerate privacy safeguards, this will ultimately help people, companies and healthcare premiums. Incentives drive behavior, and you can’t manage what you don’t measure..

  • There is a fine line between empowering employees to take charge of their health, and creating a paternalistic Big Brother culture that will only push people to find ways to cheat the system. The answer is part messaging and part company culture - it will be important to get it right.

  • The corporate wellness services industry was just $7bn in 2018, with an astonishingly low growth rate—up just 1.3% since 2013. (via Ibis World). So let’s not call this a phenomenon.

    Like most data related issues, it’s a double edged sword. Ask anyone pro-data sharing and they’ll say it helps to personalize

    The corporate wellness services industry was just $7bn in 2018, with an astonishingly low growth rate—up just 1.3% since 2013. (via Ibis World). So let’s not call this a phenomenon.

    Like most data related issues, it’s a double edged sword. Ask anyone pro-data sharing and they’ll say it helps to personalize employee services and benefits. Anyone against will bring up discrimination and data leakage liabilities.

    How about just a simple opt in? Let’s lay out in plain English what employees can expect if they share their data and what the risks are. As well as mandating that employers collecting data are required to put in place the necessary data protection measures.

  • I think this is reason #362 why the misbegotten tie between employers and health insurance has long since passed its sell-by date.

  • West Virginia teachers held a strike last year after the state threatened to penalize people who didn't show enough physical activity on their work-issued fitness trackers.

  • The reality of healthcare these days is that we spend a lot to treat symptoms. Encouraging good health is positive all around as it leads to lower healthcare costs which leads to overall lower cost of goods.

    Obesity should be treated as a national calamity that needs action and it’s great to see the

    The reality of healthcare these days is that we spend a lot to treat symptoms. Encouraging good health is positive all around as it leads to lower healthcare costs which leads to overall lower cost of goods.

    Obesity should be treated as a national calamity that needs action and it’s great to see the private sector leading the way.

    With that said, the same privacy and individual safeguards should apply here as in having employees disclose age or race: it’s not something to be judged on or discriminated by.

  • As someone who has struggled with an eating disorder for several years now, I find these kind of programs triggering and somewhat offensive. Although healthy behaviors is something to be encouraged, what counts as healthy varies greatly from person to person. BMI has been proven as an inaccurate way

    As someone who has struggled with an eating disorder for several years now, I find these kind of programs triggering and somewhat offensive. Although healthy behaviors is something to be encouraged, what counts as healthy varies greatly from person to person. BMI has been proven as an inaccurate way of measuring someone's health. This also promotes the idea that weight is an indicator of health, and that weight loss is always a positive thing. From the perspective of someone who has routinely starved herself, abused exercise, and been entirely consumed and obsessed with food on a daily basis as a means of 'getting in shape' and 'being healthy,' I believe these health incentives do far more damage to an individual's mental wellbeing than they do good for their overall health, and that's not to mention the perpetuation of diet culture...

  • No

  • We read future of work + wellness data for a living at www.trailmix.vc - for better or worse this is the tip of the iceberg...

  • My company already knows, I know, I own it!

  • My company can mind its own business. / I’ll tell it how much weight I’ve put on if it will tell me when it’s got too fat!

  • By some, this could be considered an invasion of privacy.

  • Oh, now they want you fit after controlling your propriety on your social media accounts.

  • You can see a difference in the implementation relative to success. The school district was like “walk 8,000 steps or your health insurance will go up rah.” The companies providing incentives rather than punishments do better in the examples given.

  • Omg please go beyond 'weight-to-height'. BMI shows nothing. Muscles are heavy!!

  • Being fully remote, my company doesn't even care if I'm not wearing pants.

  • No way. Give me a break from these stupid questions.

  • The unfortunate side effect of such a program is it discriminates against people with health disabilities. In my case an employer who doesn't provide adequate mental health services Makes it impossible for me to participate in such program without it.

  • This is an issue that runs between none of your business and it would save the company a lot of money if you were healthy. There are so many factors that go into being healthy or no, being over weight is not necessary the only one. One can be fit and overweight and at a good weight and have a bad lifestyle

    This is an issue that runs between none of your business and it would save the company a lot of money if you were healthy. There are so many factors that go into being healthy or no, being over weight is not necessary the only one. One can be fit and overweight and at a good weight and have a bad lifestyle or just have bad genes.

  • Our company has been doing this going on 5 years. Annual physicals equate to a 20% savings on healthcare premiums for the year. Info is only sent as an aggregate, ie no individual employee info is ever sent to the company.

  • Ref “ CW Queue” 5 yrs of Data sent to a outside company but “ of course no individual is identified”: Really??!!-if you believe all that Data is safe - not being used by other firms?- then you are naive enough to buy a famous Brooklyn Bridge from me😍

    JohnH🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿🎶🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿🤠😊🇬🇧

  • Or, from a glass half full lens they want to incentivize employees to be healthy, thus driving down employee/employer healthcare costs while maximizing productivity (and influencing employee quality of life).

  • I’m not opposed to health assessments in workplaces because healthcare cost are a big part of employers cost. That being said I think weight, and BMI are the best way to test health.

  • Well said, madam!

  • A good step towards fighting the obesity epidemic is to curb deceptive advertising by big food conglomerates. So many food items labeled low fat but loaded with sugar.

  • Chris LOTT