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The Life of an American Boy at 17

The Life of an American Boy at 17

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Contributions

  • I read the print edition of this story over the weekend, and as soon as I finished it, I KNEW that when the digital version came out, that people weren't going to be happy.

    That said, there are a few important pieces I got from reading it that we need to think about openly:

    1. The biggest takeaway

    I read the print edition of this story over the weekend, and as soon as I finished it, I KNEW that when the digital version came out, that people weren't going to be happy.

    That said, there are a few important pieces I got from reading it that we need to think about openly:

    1. The biggest takeaway from the story is Ryan saying that he doesn't actually know what he "can" do. It's not that he's trying to provoke, he's genuinely saying that. Which means we have a society are still often failing to help our younger generation for many reasons.

    2. This story needs to be told because it also highlights the depression, anxiety, and mental situations that men (and women, as the chart shows too) have been feeling from the effects of serious issues taking them on.

    3. This is the first of a series, that as Jay Fielden

    points out, that will touch on kids growing up, with each on a specific demographic (black, female, LGBT, etc.). https://www.esquire.com/news-politics/a26016262/editors-letter-march-2019/

    4. Was this story the right 1 to start with of the series? I don't think so. But it def caused a LOT of attention, and let's hope the same attention comes w/ the next parts of the series. Esquire has often touched the mental issues young men are facing. It's really important.

  • Extremely well written portrait of a "high school senior from West Bend, Wisconsin." An important article not in spite of but due to its simple premise.