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Millennials and Gen Z Have a Big Problem With Traditional Health Care

By Fortune

And they're far less likely to have primary care physicians than their parentsRead full story

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  • Gen Z is a lot more skeptical than previous generations on current business practices, including banks and healthcare. Gen Z's also open to experimenting stuff so things like acupuncture and yoga, sure but also the whole trend of pressed juice, specific types of diets, cryotherapy, ice baths, etc. The

    Gen Z is a lot more skeptical than previous generations on current business practices, including banks and healthcare. Gen Z's also open to experimenting stuff so things like acupuncture and yoga, sure but also the whole trend of pressed juice, specific types of diets, cryotherapy, ice baths, etc. The list goes on! But we want alternatives. And we want transparency!!! Transparency paired with convenience is the dream. Unfortunately the healthcare system is neither of those. :(

  • Very important to increase health literacy of the general public. Millenials and Gen Z are too young to realize the major breakthroughs in healthcare that occurred in the past 2 or 3 decades. Information and knowledge are key to build trust in scientific Medicine and Science in general

  • Dear Millennials and Gen Z, so you got a big problem with traditional health care? You want it to be more convenient, efficient , effective and transparent? You see things like acupuncture and yoga as healthful? You’d like maximum use of e-communications for MD follow ups, test results and prescriptions

    Dear Millennials and Gen Z, so you got a big problem with traditional health care? You want it to be more convenient, efficient , effective and transparent? You see things like acupuncture and yoga as healthful? You’d like maximum use of e-communications for MD follow ups, test results and prescriptions? Me too. All of it. Sincerely, a baby boomer

  • Cut it out... trying to differentiate between millennial, boomer, gen x, gen z... whatever... we are all perplexed by the way insurance companies have overtaken the healthcare system.

    And oh... while you’re at it, take a look st what malpractice insurance costs...

    The biggest problem in healthcare

    Cut it out... trying to differentiate between millennial, boomer, gen x, gen z... whatever... we are all perplexed by the way insurance companies have overtaken the healthcare system.

    And oh... while you’re at it, take a look st what malpractice insurance costs...

    The biggest problem in healthcare in the nation is not generation-specific. It’s lawyers and insurance companies...

  • Because it's WAY too expensive for most people, and most available insurance kind of sucks, and the insurance companies fight tooth and nail to not have to cover you when you need it. The idea of paying hundreds of dollars to go see a doctor when you aren't even sick is totally anathema to nearly all

    Because it's WAY too expensive for most people, and most available insurance kind of sucks, and the insurance companies fight tooth and nail to not have to cover you when you need it. The idea of paying hundreds of dollars to go see a doctor when you aren't even sick is totally anathema to nearly all my peers. We're tired of getting ripped off by price-fixing monopolists!

  • Well how can you compare different generations in having a doctor if some are 20 years old and some 80 years old? Yes, less millennials have a GP than baby boomers. Well done Sherlock!

  • It seems very logical being frustrated with the current state of the health system. The frustration is being vented on the operation and logistics of it, but the real culprit is the greed and lust for money that has come to imbed in to a very critical human need that should have been safeguarded from such encroachment

  • Many doctors are now working for large corporations and are expected to see up to 60 patients a day, especially in specialty practices. Healthcare corporations setting quotas is essentially moving the focus of healthcare away from the patients and to the stockholders.

    Yes, we're upset about having to

    Many doctors are now working for large corporations and are expected to see up to 60 patients a day, especially in specialty practices. Healthcare corporations setting quotas is essentially moving the focus of healthcare away from the patients and to the stockholders.

    Yes, we're upset about having to wait an hour in a waiting room when told to arrive 15 minutes early to fill out redundant paper forms. Yes we're tired of not having digital communication with our physicians. Yes, we're demanding convenience like video conferencing. Also, yes, we're doing our own research because quality of care continues to deteriorate as demand for company valuation increases.

  • Telemedicine has been around for years, but doctors and insurance companies have been slow to adopt and cover it. The fact that 53% of respondents across all age groups prefer telemedicine to in person visits signals this may be changing.

    We are clearly moving to a more consumer driven healthcare market

    Telemedicine has been around for years, but doctors and insurance companies have been slow to adopt and cover it. The fact that 53% of respondents across all age groups prefer telemedicine to in person visits signals this may be changing.

    We are clearly moving to a more consumer driven healthcare market, which will serve as a catalyst for providers to adopt technology that enables them to serve patients more effectively.

  • I’m very dissatisfied with current healthcare, born in healthcare 1996 as one of Millennials.

    I have skin/teeth problems and often have to see doctors. Every time I go to hospitals, I make an appointment, wait for minutes, and finally see doctors just to spend a couple of minutes being told the same

    I’m very dissatisfied with current healthcare, born in healthcare 1996 as one of Millennials.

    I have skin/teeth problems and often have to see doctors. Every time I go to hospitals, I make an appointment, wait for minutes, and finally see doctors just to spend a couple of minutes being told the same advice. This is ridiculous.

    I’m sure that major shift will soon happen in healthcare industry.

  • This is such a silly article. In the 20s/30s our regular doctor was usually a pediatrician for the kids. As we got older we added a GP-sharing for the kids, now for us. Convenience & ease is important to us too. It's like Trump & AOC aren't tweeting, what can we write about the Millenials? Particularly

    This is such a silly article. In the 20s/30s our regular doctor was usually a pediatrician for the kids. As we got older we added a GP-sharing for the kids, now for us. Convenience & ease is important to us too. It's like Trump & AOC aren't tweeting, what can we write about the Millenials? Particularly to separate them from their grandparents.

  • Baby boomer here. The insurance industry is such a scam. My doc gives a huge near 50% discount to the uninsured because they save that much on cash patients by not having to wade through all the red tape the insurance carriers require. At one time the Dr charged $50 you paid $50 now he charges $150 and

    Baby boomer here. The insurance industry is such a scam. My doc gives a huge near 50% discount to the uninsured because they save that much on cash patients by not having to wade through all the red tape the insurance carriers require. At one time the Dr charged $50 you paid $50 now he charges $150 and gets paid $60 by the insurance company-Insurance companies make millions by charging Americans $1500 a month “just in case”

  • It seems like fortune magazine could have gone with a better headline. It’s less about generations and more about quality of care.

    On one side, doctors are becoming more flexible in their approach and creating these consortiums where you have to pay subscription fees to keep your practitioner. Squeezing

    It seems like fortune magazine could have gone with a better headline. It’s less about generations and more about quality of care.

    On one side, doctors are becoming more flexible in their approach and creating these consortiums where you have to pay subscription fees to keep your practitioner. Squeezing even more from the patients.

    On the other side, patients who aren’t “VIP” - that’s quite literally the name of many of these groups, your stuck with huge wait times and being a cog in a machine. The moves in the market impact all generations.

    The only people who cannot innovate are those who need the healthcare.

  • Isn’t it logical that older people would have a higher rate of maintaining a regular doctor? I don’t think I saw a doctor from the time I was 20 til around 40.

    I agree with and understand the desire for more efficient as electronic follow up, but a number of doctors I know acknowledge that a relationship

    Isn’t it logical that older people would have a higher rate of maintaining a regular doctor? I don’t think I saw a doctor from the time I was 20 til around 40.

    I agree with and understand the desire for more efficient as electronic follow up, but a number of doctors I know acknowledge that a relationship with the patient (getting to know the individual; active participation by the patient) helps them give better service.

  • Millennials and gen z don’t know what they want in health care because they really haven’t needed it yet. They can say whatever they want before having kids and/or a disease but after that they will be at their regular checkups with their primary physician just like everyone else.

  • Notable in this piece is that older generations ALSO want to have access to more digital resources. It’s a new and desirable option to many people regardless of generation. Most older folks had no choices but to have a primary physician and so they are already set up that way- the plans used to require

    Notable in this piece is that older generations ALSO want to have access to more digital resources. It’s a new and desirable option to many people regardless of generation. Most older folks had no choices but to have a primary physician and so they are already set up that way- the plans used to require you to go to the primary first before you could see a specialist. Younger generations are not boxed in. There is also more information out there re: alternatives like acupuncture and yoga so there is just more awareness of that as an option.

  • So, younger people are less familiar with how traditional healthcare operates in the U.S. (seems obvious). And they are more likely to want technology solutions (makes sense). So, naturally they hear about all the health options people are willing to talk about (including non-traditional and even woo

    So, younger people are less familiar with how traditional healthcare operates in the U.S. (seems obvious). And they are more likely to want technology solutions (makes sense). So, naturally they hear about all the health options people are willing to talk about (including non-traditional and even woo) — and less about traditional because they don’t know how to communicate.

    The biggest takeaway for me is that traditional healthcare has little ability/credibility to be part of the conversation with younger people on why they should engage them. They’ve been in complete control for so long. So, not only do most not offer “convenience, efficiency, and transparency,” they can’t even talk about how they are changing, or why you should choose them.

  • lol i don’t even have insurance.

    startup founder problems, I guess?

  • I'm closing in on 60 (more Generation Jones than Boomer) and more than half my life has been network healthcare. Matter of fact, because I was also in the Navy in my younger days, I haven't had a "family doctor" since I was in high school.

  • Interesting article with some great points about what different generations expect from health care. I wonder how much baby boomers are responsible for the shift from a more authoritarian approach to a more person- centered one.

    I also wonder if older generations are more likely to have a PCP simply

    Interesting article with some great points about what different generations expect from health care. I wonder how much baby boomers are responsible for the shift from a more authoritarian approach to a more person- centered one.

    I also wonder if older generations are more likely to have a PCP simply because they are older and more likely to experience a health concern or need for screening.

  • Our system encourages a for profit health-care system. Meaning our insurance companies/certain political people care more about a profit then the actual health of an individual. It's very anti-health care if you ask me. This goes so far down the range from mental health medications ~ ask your doctor

    Our system encourages a for profit health-care system. Meaning our insurance companies/certain political people care more about a profit then the actual health of an individual. It's very anti-health care if you ask me. This goes so far down the range from mental health medications ~ ask your doctor to look into the long term studies and the subjective numbers in the actual studies, to treatment plans for pain management (opioid crisis.) We understand that alot of symptoms to a broad range of diseases are caused by poor diet/lack of specific nutrients/poor life style. We understand that there are better treatments for pain then opioids that they cause more pain then they actually heal. So the question is why are the vitamins for the diet, and the better treatments for pain management shut out? Lack of profit. There is no profit in a temporary vitamin that isn't addictive. I have personally been told this by a few doctors. With them admitting that we live in a society that profit is encouraged over health care. Happy valentine's day! 😊 from someone looking for help in a crappy health care system.

  • For about ten years now the statisticians have said genz starts in 95. I just don't understand the manipulation of dates. At least you are close some are writing genz begins in 2000 which is not correct.

    In any event, I agree that genz is way less likely to seek medical help. My neighbor fell out the

    For about ten years now the statisticians have said genz starts in 95. I just don't understand the manipulation of dates. At least you are close some are writing genz begins in 2000 which is not correct.

    In any event, I agree that genz is way less likely to seek medical help. My neighbor fell out the window and refused to go to the hospital. The ambulance literally was doing a followup visit the next day. I think people are really afraid of getting harvested for their organs. The shameless display in Virginia supporting abortion on dilation did not help. It made it pretty obvious that medical professiinals want body parts. I don't think anyone should be knocking the ER door down, just be healthy.

  • I can’t speak for the American health care system, and I sympathize with the malfunctioning of that system. We have our gripes with the Canadian system too, but we cannot complain.

    However, what is alarming to me is the rise of skepticism in science and medical expertise in which pseudoscience and woo

    I can’t speak for the American health care system, and I sympathize with the malfunctioning of that system. We have our gripes with the Canadian system too, but we cannot complain.

    However, what is alarming to me is the rise of skepticism in science and medical expertise in which pseudoscience and woo healings are the shallow go-tos.

    Millennials and others that buy into this bs require due diligence and forgoing Dr. Google and aggressive marketing by idiotic “healers.” They are a danger to themselves and others when almost eradicated diseases come roaring back.

  • Although I agree that health care needs to adapt faster to newer generations and be user-friendly by incorporating new technologies, the information given is biased by the fact that traditional health care is much more than routine checkups with the primary care physician and it cannot be substituted

    Although I agree that health care needs to adapt faster to newer generations and be user-friendly by incorporating new technologies, the information given is biased by the fact that traditional health care is much more than routine checkups with the primary care physician and it cannot be substituted by yoga or acupuncture or just by looking at an app. As a millennial and as an oncologist, I believe our generation demands more information in real-time as their education level is higher and the paternal doctor-patient relationship does not fit in as they want to be part of the decision making.

    However they do appreciate and understand the value of the current health care and I would dare to say more: they want it.

  • Well, it’s not only millennials, it is 5his Baby Boomer too... I never had a primary physician, until 2095, when I found the VA would actually provide care. I was told when I came home from a Vietnam, the VA is not going to help me, and I was on my own. I have had acupuncture, tried yoga, found help

    Well, it’s not only millennials, it is 5his Baby Boomer too... I never had a primary physician, until 2095, when I found the VA would actually provide care. I was told when I came home from a Vietnam, the VA is not going to help me, and I was on my own. I have had acupuncture, tried yoga, found help through Chiropractic and Naturopathy. Of course I have had a relatively healthy life, so avoiding doctors has not been a problem. Just remember, just when you think everything is new, you’ll find out it has happened before!

  • Generation is a bad way to frame this problem. Age group is a better way to frame it.

    Remember the adage about having health when you’re young but not money or time, then when you get older you have time and money but declining health? Gen Y and Gen Z are both still young demographics. If you’re under

    Generation is a bad way to frame this problem. Age group is a better way to frame it.

    Remember the adage about having health when you’re young but not money or time, then when you get older you have time and money but declining health? Gen Y and Gen Z are both still young demographics. If you’re under 30 and generally healthy, you need lighter, cheaper services that don’t take much time. Today’s healthcare system is built for “customers” who have just the opposite - plenty of time to go back and forth to the doctor and good insurance or Medicare to cover the cost of increasingly extensive care practices. If nothing were to change for 40 years, you could take this same article and put “Millennials” and “Gen Z” where Silent and Boomers are now.

  • There are problems with traditional health care. I have been in health care for 40 years. One of the biggest problems now is that people are getting misinformation from social media and believing everything they read.

  • You wanna know why?? Because we are simply a lot more healthierrrrrr!!!

  • Unsurprising but important to watch nonetheless

  • Just Millennials and Gen Z?? My experience, it started in Gen X but we didn't have the online media available to expose how pissed off everyone was.

  • This is just the natural progression of human interaction with the efficiency of our technology. With all the information at our fingertips, is it any wonder that the generation with more exposure to it than any other in human history, is going to use it to make the best decisions for themselves?

  • This is a thought provoking story. Does the story reflect the DISTRUST of traditional medicine? The EXPENSE of traditional medicine? The INEFFECTIVENESS of traditional medicine? Or does all of this merely reflect that the Gen X, Millennials and Gen Z people are generally in good health due to their age

    This is a thought provoking story. Does the story reflect the DISTRUST of traditional medicine? The EXPENSE of traditional medicine? The INEFFECTIVENESS of traditional medicine? Or does all of this merely reflect that the Gen X, Millennials and Gen Z people are generally in good health due to their age?

    My instincts tell me most younger people have seen the failure of western health care due to the costs and ineffectiveness of treating symptoms and are turning to preventative measures which would include exercise programs, diet and lifestyle choices thus avoiding the symptom treatment of modern western medicine. Healthcare costs and national healthcare requirements have had the unexpected consequence of forcing people to look at alternatives. Ya gotta love free enterprise where people can still have choices and the best choice still win.

  • Life and the needs of society changes from generation to generation. When it supposedly catches up the next new generations will have their expectations. Its nobody's fault really.

    I am sure those born today will be expected to be cared by something even more advanced like robots and an artificial intelligent

    Life and the needs of society changes from generation to generation. When it supposedly catches up the next new generations will have their expectations. Its nobody's fault really.

    I am sure those born today will be expected to be cared by something even more advanced like robots and an artificial intelligent central medical intelligence that has their medical file and all others and knows all current flu strains going on etc. and can fix us quick based on whats goung on out there.

  • Lemme see, the first poster is a Boomer and is unhappy with health Care.iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii

  • Los #millenials cambiando los parámetros de todas las industrias

  • Too be fair, boomers didn't have to see a PA. They directly saw a physician. For boomers who are upset with x or z; boomers made gen z/x. If GenX/Z are such failures, as old whining boomers seem to complain, does blame lie with the canvas or the painter?

  • Interesting

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