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The 21st century belongs to China—but the 22nd will be Africa’s

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Contributions

  • Whether this will be true depends very much on the choices and actions of today. And one thing is for sure: if the 22nd Century is to be Africa’s century, then the continent needs to move quickly from an aid paradigm to an investment paradigm. Dependency does not spur innovation. Smart investment does.

  • In most cases, “leapfrogging” is a direct result of lack of infrastructure as resources are forced to find more efficient ways to secure provisions, means of commerce, and transport. So, China’s investment should be and hopefully will be aimed mostly, if not fully, at literal infrastructure - the ability

    In most cases, “leapfrogging” is a direct result of lack of infrastructure as resources are forced to find more efficient ways to secure provisions, means of commerce, and transport. So, China’s investment should be and hopefully will be aimed mostly, if not fully, at literal infrastructure - the ability to quickly and safely get from A to B. In a connected world “Leapfrogging” can be a curse as nations are not forced to build and grow the typical structures that underpin commerce and trade - hence the explosion in African mobile payment technology and other sectors aimed squarely at addressing weaknesses in infrastructure, politics, banking, and so on. Too long have companies and foreign nations taken advantage of Africa, its people, and its resources due to this fact.

    I have written about my admiration of China’s perfectly planned and perfectly executed new world order. I’ve also written of my fear of it too. They have been and continue to be laser-focused on progress in several key fronts. They are aided in their mission by 2 key factors in my mind: a distracted US - which seems to be quagmired in political and economic unrest and their willingness to invest in areas or sectors other 1st world nations see as unattractive like Africa.

    China’s willingness to be “early arrivers” and active participants in the areas least tapped for investment and opportunity will pay-off in spades. Additionally, what appears to be global/regional Chinese investment now may amount to global security concerns later.

  • If we make it to the 22nd century and that’s a big if.

  • “Cultural vibranium” is an interesting concept as it is very hard to imitate and hence can provide unique value in a complex and competitive world. I particularly like how the “ntu” concept can help seamlessly develop many things — solutions for caring about the environment, potential for accepting robotics

    “Cultural vibranium” is an interesting concept as it is very hard to imitate and hence can provide unique value in a complex and competitive world. I particularly like how the “ntu” concept can help seamlessly develop many things — solutions for caring about the environment, potential for accepting robotics and machine parts in humans, and other everything-is-connected networking concepts. I worry about the exhibitions of exclusion that materialize every now and then and that are fueling active conflicts across many countries. Perhaps some of us have forgotten how to really practice “Ubuntu”?

  • Nice to see someone optimistic about the future. I, for one, can’t get passed the feasibility of the whole planet being in environmental turmoil in 100 years. Blade Runner seems more feasible than Black Panther.

  • Sadly, the African continent's time to shine will come too late. AOC has projected the end of the world happens before Africa can develop from 3rd world to 1st.

  • Sorry, since this kind of article comes from USA, I don't buy shit of it.