Skip to navigationSkip to content

Report: Gig work split evenly between men, women with a 2% pay gap

By Orange County Register

The average pay for a male Wonolo worker in the gig economy is $14.69 per hour; women are close behind with $14.38 an hour, the company reportedRead full story

Comments

  • Also share to
  • Stephane Kasriel
    Stephane KasrielproCEO at Upwork

    While we should be careful not to generalize (this study is based on Wonolo’s customer base, not the “gig economy” as a whole), it’s encouraging to see that there are mechanisms that can be used to reduce gender pay gaps that occur in the traditional workforce.

    Arguably one of the best things freelancing platforms can do is to help people remain engaged in the workforce when a full time job isn’t an option. For example, young parents with care duties, particularly women, for whom fully exiting

    While we should be careful not to generalize (this study is based on Wonolo’s customer base, not the “gig economy” as a whole), it’s encouraging to see that there are mechanisms that can be used to reduce gender pay gaps that occur in the traditional workforce.

    Arguably one of the best things freelancing platforms can do is to help people remain engaged in the workforce when a full time job isn’t an option. For example, young parents with care duties, particularly women, for whom fully exiting the workforce can make it much harder to re-enter later.

  • Allison Schrager
    Allison SchragerReporter at Quartz

    Evidence suggest a big part of the wage gap is a premium for flexibility, which women with children value. Makes sense that with gig work, there’d be less or no gap.

  • This makes sense considering gig work is merit-based as well as driven by quantified outcomes. You get the job done, you get more jobs. You work more, you earn more. In these types of incentive structures, compensation is blind to diversity (in a good way).

    Unfortunately, full-time and especially executive level employment doesn’t work that way.

  • Steve Jenks
    Steve JenksBoeing (retired)

    Mulivariate statistical analysis shows that the reported 20% pay difference is primarily determined by what jobs the sexes gravitate to. Men typically pick higher paying jobs working with things (like engineering) while women tend to take jobs working with people (like retail sales). It’s just the way humans are wired. This together with men willing to work longer hours, time flexibility, etc. (read the scientific literature) makes up the lion’s share of the difference. Are there women working the

    Mulivariate statistical analysis shows that the reported 20% pay difference is primarily determined by what jobs the sexes gravitate to. Men typically pick higher paying jobs working with things (like engineering) while women tend to take jobs working with people (like retail sales). It’s just the way humans are wired. This together with men willing to work longer hours, time flexibility, etc. (read the scientific literature) makes up the lion’s share of the difference. Are there women working the same jobs and hours as men and earning less? Sure, but it’s nothing like the difference that the 20% difference seems to indicate. My guess is it’s more like the small difference this study finds.

  • Gary Stone
    Gary Stone

    What is gig economy

Want more conversations like this?

Join the Quartz community for all the intelligence, without the noise.

App Store BadgeGoogle Play Badge
Leaderboard Screenshot

A community of leaders, subject matter experts, and curious minds bringing nuance back to how we talk about the news.

Editors' Picks Screenshot

No content overload: our editors will curate the most notable and discussion-worthy pieces for you every day.

Share Screenshot

Don’t just read the story, tell it: contribute your ideas and experience to the dialogue.