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Dear parents: It doesn’t matter where your kid goes to college

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  • As a current college student, fortunate enough to enjoy the experience without a incurring great deal of debt, I still believe that college often primarily serves a gatekeeper function, and top tier institutions even more acutely. By this I mean that much of the learning and experiences could be obtained

    As a current college student, fortunate enough to enjoy the experience without a incurring great deal of debt, I still believe that college often primarily serves a gatekeeper function, and top tier institutions even more acutely. By this I mean that much of the learning and experiences could be obtained for a lower cost and through less selective processes, but the fact that a degree, especially one from an elite school is required for many careers, means that there are few alternatives but getting into a rat race and forking over a lot of money.

    That said, I think that the best and brightest students do deserve special recognition, but that the standards used to judge who is the best and brightest are not so opaque and arbitrary. I think that a transparent standard to gauge students would likely also cut down on things like bribery for admission.

  • Stephanie Kasriel nails the reality. A former boss and now friend advised me that getting an MBA is great, but the only reason you would pay for a Harvard or Yale MBA is for the connections and not for the education. (He went to Harvard.)

  • THIS is how parents SHOULD think about college admissions, based on research. It may require some recalibrating but it can be done.

  • Eh ... In terms on learning, yes, not surprised. But the kid graduating from "Wharton" is probably getting a better job than the kids from Middle Podunk University. The unfortunate reality of humanity is that branding matters, a lot, and it does matter where your kid goes to college, because employers

    Eh ... In terms on learning, yes, not surprised. But the kid graduating from "Wharton" is probably getting a better job than the kids from Middle Podunk University. The unfortunate reality of humanity is that branding matters, a lot, and it does matter where your kid goes to college, because employers moronically favor seeing the right words.

  • It matters. Both the institution and the fit. A great fit at a crappy institution still gets you a crappy degree.

    But these parents weren’t helping their kids. And even if they’re going to profess that was their intent; the reality is that they were really doing it for bragging rights. If you really

    It matters. Both the institution and the fit. A great fit at a crappy institution still gets you a crappy degree.

    But these parents weren’t helping their kids. And even if they’re going to profess that was their intent; the reality is that they were really doing it for bragging rights. If you really wanted what was best for your child you wouldn’t cheat for them. You’d support their poor choices along with their good choices because you know that’s where the real learning is. And you’d want them to enjoy real success.

  • The comments here well reflect rather unfortunate reality of college branding. That is the very reason why professors, especially those in admin positions, do care about college rankings, no matter what they publicly say about them.

  • I went to and graduated from a highly regarded school in the East Coast. When I left the East Coast and moved to the Midwest, my fancy degree meant nothing. I was competing for jobs with welfare moms without a degree and another person who has a cosmetology degree. I worked at a job with coworkers who

    I went to and graduated from a highly regarded school in the East Coast. When I left the East Coast and moved to the Midwest, my fancy degree meant nothing. I was competing for jobs with welfare moms without a degree and another person who has a cosmetology degree. I worked at a job with coworkers who did not have a degree. College degrees does not equate to job success.

  • I tend to agree about the ”success “ factor, however doe this scandal have more to do with projecting a positive public image or persona?

  • What a beautiful reminder/yes the hiring bias runs deep but remember we have to be the change in the world we seek

  • Mar 10/19; Very thought-provoking; is this true in Canada as well? Certain ethnicities more than others?