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No, more than 200 scientists did not just sign a petition warning about cancer from Airpods. That doesn’t mean there’s no risk

By Quartz

No, 200 scientists did not just sign a petition warning about cancer from Airpods. That doesn’t mean there’s no riskRead full story

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  • Harrison In
    Harrison InProject Manager at Veracity Protocol

    Information needs to be more clear for readers to understand. The ambiguity leads to misinformation where, in this case, leads to panic. Another thing that needs to be addressed is that not everyone understands scientific terms that are used when reading articles. When someone sees "radiation," they immediately think danger. The author should actually explain what it does explicitly rather than just stop there and this article addresses that.

    Now that the confusion is over, more companies ought

    Information needs to be more clear for readers to understand. The ambiguity leads to misinformation where, in this case, leads to panic. Another thing that needs to be addressed is that not everyone understands scientific terms that are used when reading articles. When someone sees "radiation," they immediately think danger. The author should actually explain what it does explicitly rather than just stop there and this article addresses that.

    Now that the confusion is over, more companies ought to be more careful and transparent with the technology they use/create.

  • Elijah Wolfson
    Elijah WolfsonEditor at Quartz

    Though this is a legitimate concern, the fact that this conversation is happening online today, in this way, is more a signal of the pace of web media and the problems of aggregated reporting by inexperienced generalists than it is of any actual problems with Bluetooth headphones. Thankfully our environment/environmental health reporter Zoe Schlanger has experience covering this subject and was able to provide a clear-eyed analysis.

    I’m glad our readers, at least, will be well informed. But bigger

    Though this is a legitimate concern, the fact that this conversation is happening online today, in this way, is more a signal of the pace of web media and the problems of aggregated reporting by inexperienced generalists than it is of any actual problems with Bluetooth headphones. Thankfully our environment/environmental health reporter Zoe Schlanger has experience covering this subject and was able to provide a clear-eyed analysis.

    I’m glad our readers, at least, will be well informed. But bigger picture, I’m not sure what the journalism community can do to prevent this type of spread of disinformation-not exactly falsehoods but also not the entire truth.

  • Rajesh Narayanan
    Rajesh Narayanan

    This is not just a non-problem, but also doesn’t mean every single wireless headset has this potential issue. Using a premium product and an intentional double negative in the title served as nothing more than click bait! #airpods #cancer

  • Robert Pearson
    Robert Pearson

    This is something that has been known for a while and something people really need to start taking note of with this proposed 5G that they are trying to push on us.

  • Jan Iverson
    Jan Iversonretired

    What’s an airpod

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