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The 20 worst phones of the century, and how they got that way

The 20 worst phones of the century, and how they got that way

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Contributions

  • It’s always interesting to look at failures with the benefit of hindsight; some lessons we can see more easily than others—most commonly a failure to understand the user and translate that into product decisions that create a meaningful, viable experience. Often, this seems to happen because of a company’s

    It’s always interesting to look at failures with the benefit of hindsight; some lessons we can see more easily than others—most commonly a failure to understand the user and translate that into product decisions that create a meaningful, viable experience. Often, this seems to happen because of a company’s desire to ‘make’ a platform or system work or the extend current success. At other times, the context changes faster than a company can adapt its capabilities. BlackBerry and Nokia best embody both dynamics. While it’s easy to look with disdain at them now, both were strong, innovative competitors at one time, but strength can become weakness and blind one to a changing context. (And of course, some of these phones were simply the embodiment of bad ideas or poor executions.)

  • Having used 8 of these 20 worst phones, and having at least two or three still in a drawer somewhere... Totally agree with Harrison:

    "It is easy to innovate but hard to monetize"

  • Wonderful trip down bad phone memory lane. I had three of these! Somebody top me, please.

  • I had the BlackBerry Storm for work. It was so hard to type on it with that flexible screen. After two weeks I gave up and begged the IT department for a used phone just, to get out of that thing.

  • These phones are just a representation on how companies build and innovate but do not really think about the user themselves. It is easy to innovate but hard to monetize.

    Companies need to do research and really understand their users so that people would buy or use their products/services.

    Startups

    These phones are just a representation on how companies build and innovate but do not really think about the user themselves. It is easy to innovate but hard to monetize.

    Companies need to do research and really understand their users so that people would buy or use their products/services.

    Startups also go through these problems. We all maybe too far up in the clouds and forget what reality we are in.

  • I too was a fan of the exploding phone

    “Samsung started selling a “Fan Edition” of the Galaxy Note 7 (with a smaller, safer battery) in mid-2017”

  • Curious if someone bought any of those cell phone failures!

  • Innovation is messy. It feels so wasteful, but it’s part of the process.

  • To be fair I avoided smart phones because I used a net book (linux at that which I don't miss) and a flip phone which I will always miss.