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Are elite colleges really a ‘golden ticket’ to a successful life?

By MarketWatch

The college admissions scandal highlights how a coveted status symbol may actually mean very littleRead full story

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  • It’s dangerous to think of a career in such a one-dimensional way.

    Disruption happens so quickly in the modern economy that there is no such thing as a “Golden Ticket.”

    If you don’t keep evolving, it’s unlikely that Law, Accounting, Coding, Banking and even Medicine will provide you with a steady long term income-stream going forward.

  • It is interesting how everyone saying it doesn’t really matter tends to be people who actually went to those schools (me included), are now in a position of power and privilege and can say “overrated.” Wonder if we’d feel that way if we didn’t have those advantages in the first place.

  • Can we at least start to call our the schools for creating a (if we are being honest- false) impression of scarcity and exclusivity. “Schools go to great lengths to increase the number of applications they receive in part to push the share of students they admit down, allowing them to appear more selective — an important factor in college rankings.” A generation ago many students applied to 2 reaches, 2 realistic choices, and then 2 safety schools. Now the number is often north of 20 schools because

    Can we at least start to call our the schools for creating a (if we are being honest- false) impression of scarcity and exclusivity. “Schools go to great lengths to increase the number of applications they receive in part to push the share of students they admit down, allowing them to appear more selective — an important factor in college rankings.” A generation ago many students applied to 2 reaches, 2 realistic choices, and then 2 safety schools. Now the number is often north of 20 schools because of this false narrative created by the schools. It creates a ton of essays (in addition to the common app), a ton of just plain work- and by the way a lot more fees than needed. WHY? just to basically inflate their stats to seem more exclusive than they really are.

  • You can’t have a competitive education system without having an elite. The key is making sure that the elite become so based on their ability rather than their wealth. And we are a long way off achieving that.

  • A college degree is a passport in most cases, and means a lot more when breaking into the job market than it does down the line. In the long haul it’s about your performance track record, ability to network, and deriving the greatest value from both of those things. If someone is completely focused on career success, the fact they graduated from Chico State as opposed to Yale becomes moot very quickly.

    There are benefits to being an alumni from certain schools. If a job candidate graduated from

    A college degree is a passport in most cases, and means a lot more when breaking into the job market than it does down the line. In the long haul it’s about your performance track record, ability to network, and deriving the greatest value from both of those things. If someone is completely focused on career success, the fact they graduated from Chico State as opposed to Yale becomes moot very quickly.

    There are benefits to being an alumni from certain schools. If a job candidate graduated from Notre Dame or Texas A&M College Station, and the person interviewing them did as well, the conversation goes as follows:

    Interviewer: “We are hoping to bring someone on board with a few years in XYZ services, who is also ABC certified.”

    Candidate: “I have no experience in this field, and no significant relative training either. I graduated Notre Dame just last week.”

    Interviewer: “Ah! You also graduated from Notre Dame? Congratulations! You start next month. HR will be in contact with you shortly to explain and organize your benefits.”

    Granted those are more the exceptions than the rule, and the example above is slightly embellished. Though all told, it doesn’t hurt to have graduated from a good school. It’s a rather easy cursory measurement of someone during a first pass at a resume. Also good schools can be helpful in creating meaningful contacts potentially down the road.

  • It all depends on what you study.

  • In today's world, there are many stats or attributes that companies and people consider valuable. As a student who applied into the college admissions process, I really didn't know what to expect. There is really no transparency or real definitive judgement. It varies too much.

    One thing I learned from it though, that I think is the biggest takeaway from college is finding the best fit for yourself. After looking through many schools, it really did make the most sense to go to a school that offers

    In today's world, there are many stats or attributes that companies and people consider valuable. As a student who applied into the college admissions process, I really didn't know what to expect. There is really no transparency or real definitive judgement. It varies too much.

    One thing I learned from it though, that I think is the biggest takeaway from college is finding the best fit for yourself. After looking through many schools, it really did make the most sense to go to a school that offers a degree that is uniquely suited to giving me the best success in the field I want.

  • First, it’s funny that the internet ad that ran concurrently with this article is for a test prep service that can help you get into top colleges. Second, while advantages of a degree from a top school may not be the golden ticket per se, it certainly makes gaining entry level jobs, or at least considerations for such jobs, easier. To the extent the top colleges continue to produce above average talent, their brands will be maintained and the value of one of these degrees will remain elevated.

  • I think the article is trying to let elite colleges walk away from entrance corruption and lack of transparency. Our current Supreme Court are predominately Harvard or Yale educated. In fact only Clarence Thomas dis not. Of our Presidents, over the last 50 years, all attended elite schools, except Nixon (Whittier, Ford (Michigan), and Carter(Union). I think you will find similar results with the Big Wigs, of Wall Street. From my empirical research, I think there is definitely a “golden ticket”. Nice

    I think the article is trying to let elite colleges walk away from entrance corruption and lack of transparency. Our current Supreme Court are predominately Harvard or Yale educated. In fact only Clarence Thomas dis not. Of our Presidents, over the last 50 years, all attended elite schools, except Nixon (Whittier, Ford (Michigan), and Carter(Union). I think you will find similar results with the Big Wigs, of Wall Street. From my empirical research, I think there is definitely a “golden ticket”. Nice try Market Watch, part of the Bloomberg empire. Oh, Bloomberg went to Harvard!

  • autodidactism in conjunction with following your own road is the real ticket!

  • These schools have strangled education rather than promote it.

    High tuition costs yet

    -Property is payed off 10 fold

    -Success is what you have done or how much you charge?

    -When education obscures experience naive decisions in that Corp is made.

  • To answer your question YES!!! Take this scenario two doctors apply for the same job at a city hospital one doctor graduates from an Ivy League university with a “C” the second graduates from a non Ivy League school with an “A”. Who do you think gets the job? Status is everything in today’s society from the cars we drive, the clothes we wear, the neighborhoods we live in, to the social circles we get into. It pays to have the right credentials and know the right people.

  • The facts and figures of this article do not mention a very important element in this discussion. Nor do the many responses cover the most important results. Graduating from a prestigious university may give a person 50 years of fortune and possibly fame, however, what will become of their everlasting souls for the eternity to come. A person born with a silver spoon in their mouth may have an eternity of suffering because of their sins committed in those 50 years. Of what value was their Ivy League

    The facts and figures of this article do not mention a very important element in this discussion. Nor do the many responses cover the most important results. Graduating from a prestigious university may give a person 50 years of fortune and possibly fame, however, what will become of their everlasting souls for the eternity to come. A person born with a silver spoon in their mouth may have an eternity of suffering because of their sins committed in those 50 years. Of what value was their Ivy League education if all it did was provide them with an agonizing everlasting death in Hell. Could this be the reason why our super elite colleges downplay Christianity as much as they do? Our universities do not want their students to know that their behavior could lead to a hell. If the students were aware of this fact of life maybe they would not choose an elite education as the only avenue for their life to follow.

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