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Anasticia Sholik

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SCOTUS update

The world's eyes are on a US child abduction case. The supreme court will decide how to apply international law in the case of a mother taking her daughter from Italy to the US to flee her allegedly abusive ex-husband.

A case about international child abduction law has the world watching SCOTUS

There is something especially heartening about a cross-cultural love story. It shows that humans are all essentially the same and that our differences are merely superficial.

But when love turns into hate and parents of differing nationalities break up, there's nothing more terrifying than the idea

There is something especially heartening about a cross-cultural love story. It shows that humans are all essentially the same and that our differences are merely superficial.

But when love turns into hate and parents of differing nationalities break up, there's nothing more terrifying than the idea that your once true love will take off with your child to another land.

This week the US Supreme Court will consider just such a horror story, the tale of a small child separated from her mother and at the center of an international custody dispute of global significance.

Trump and the courts

Objectivity is on trial in Trump's impeachment hearings. A republican congressman sought to undermine a panel of four legal experts by asking whether they voted for Donald Trump—attacking a core principle of the judiciary system that people can put biases aside and act impartially.

The concept of objectivity is under attack at the Trump impeachment hearings

On Wednesday I attended the hearing on constitutional grounds for impeachment of Donald Trump. It was a heartening affair because it shows a lively republic in pursuit of truth and it's always fun to see civics in action.

But it was disheartening because Republicans attacked the constitutional scholars

On Wednesday I attended the hearing on constitutional grounds for impeachment of Donald Trump. It was a heartening affair because it shows a lively republic in pursuit of truth and it's always fun to see civics in action.

But it was disheartening because Republicans attacked the constitutional scholars testifying, questioning their objectivity and suggesting that they could not possibly be unbiased if they didn't reveal how they voted in the last presidential elections. And with each observer they manage to convince of this impossibility, we all lose a little bit more.

Trump's taxes will stay secret, for now. Trump argues that, as the president, his financial records are special. Lower courts have disagreed—but the US Supreme Court has granted the president's legal team more time to work on their petition.

The Supreme Court grants Trump’s emergency stay in financial records case

US president Donald Trump yesterday got what he wanted from, of all people, Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The progressive jurist granted the Republican president's request for a stay that would suspend an order in a lower court allowing his financial records to be reviewed.

But RBG was't

US president Donald Trump yesterday got what he wanted from, of all people, Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The progressive jurist granted the Republican president's request for a stay that would suspend an order in a lower court allowing his financial records to be reviewed.

But RBG was't signaling her approval of Trump's legal stance, just giving him time to file a petition for review, and it happened to be her because the justices rotate duties with respect to emergency applications. Now the House of Representatives must respond by Dec. 11 and the justices will ultimately have to decide if they want to walk into this political landmine and accept review of three financial matters dealing with Trump's records and his claims the executive is special.

Metals.com scam

Amazon attrition

At the movies

Fashion forward

Reshaping society

Get smart about parenting

Raising a child is hard. But the “parenting is hard” trope, which feeds memes and dinner conversations, can be dangerous. It frames the problem as the individual failure of a single parent rather than as a social issue.

The hardest part of being a parent has nothing to do with raising kids

I always say we have to raise our girls to be brave, not perfect. But it's not enough for parents to try to do this work alone, we have to change as a society because our kids are getting messages from everywhere - media, school, classmates - so it's on all of us together.

See you later!

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I’m 14, and I quit social media after discovering what was posted about me

I’m 14, and I quit social media after discovering what was posted about me

Read more on Fast Company

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  • Here's a good litmus test for posting things about other people on social media: "Is this my story to tell?"

    Unfortunately, most parents have a hard time understanding where their lives & stories end, and their children's begin. I have friends who are constantly mining their children's lives for content

    Here's a good litmus test for posting things about other people on social media: "Is this my story to tell?"

    Unfortunately, most parents have a hard time understanding where their lives & stories end, and their children's begin. I have friends who are constantly mining their children's lives for content to post, and I'm always taken aback by it. On the other hand, I have one friend who's very good about asking her daughter whether she can publicly share stuff about her, and just wish more of my friends would follow her lead.

  • “Parents should also reflect about their use of social media and how it could potentially impact their children’s lives...” — very persuasive and well written by this 14-year-old!

  • Being a parent that’s posted dozens of pictures of my kids online, I find this person makes some very good points.

  • She admitted that she didn't understand the privacy settings on Facebook until later. I suspect that she thought the photos and posts about her were shared with the world and not simply with friends and family. I'm going to presume that her family, seasoned Facebook users, are savvy social media users

    She admitted that she didn't understand the privacy settings on Facebook until later. I suspect that she thought the photos and posts about her were shared with the world and not simply with friends and family. I'm going to presume that her family, seasoned Facebook users, are savvy social media users. Her parents are obviously raising a very bright young lady.

    Here's a truth, though. Before the internet and social media, parents and siblings took photos and showed them to friends, family, neighbors and co-workers. They told anecdotes. The only difference is now they have a more efficient means of doing so.

    Here's a final truth. People this writer's age were mortified then, too.

  • “There, for anyone to see on her public Facebook account, were all of the embarrassing moments from my childhood: The letter I wrote to the tooth fairy when I was five years old, pictures of me crying when I was a toddler, and even vacation pictures of me when I was 12 and 13 that I had no knowledge

    “There, for anyone to see on her public Facebook account, were all of the embarrassing moments from my childhood: The letter I wrote to the tooth fairy when I was five years old, pictures of me crying when I was a toddler, and even vacation pictures of me when I was 12 and 13 that I had no knowledge of. It seemed that my entire life was documented on her Facebook account, and for 13 years, I had no idea.

    I could understand why my mother would post these things; to our extended family and her friends they were cute, funny moments. But to me they were mortifying. Scrolling through my sister’s tweets, I saw what my sister had been laughing about. She would frequently quote me and the random things I would say, it seemed anything I had ever said to her that she thought was funny was fair game. Things I had no idea she was posting online.”

  • It's a whole new world with a list of social media harms that were hard to imagine even a few years ago. Think before you post - about yourself and about your family! "I had just turned 13, and I thought I was just beginning my public online life, when in fact there were hundreds of pictures and stories

    It's a whole new world with a list of social media harms that were hard to imagine even a few years ago. Think before you post - about yourself and about your family! "I had just turned 13, and I thought I was just beginning my public online life, when in fact there were hundreds of pictures and stories of me that, would live on the internet forever, whether I wanted it to be or not, and I didn’t have control over it. I was furious; I felt betrayed and lied to."

  • Very well articulated. I'm glad my parents didn't have social media to embarass me with. Now I can do it myself! 🤦🏾‍♂️🤣

  • Can’t believe a 14 year old could have so much control in her actions. Also be so much informative about internet and social media!!! The amount of comprehensive thoughts she put in her article for her age is commendable.

  • Obviously the real answer is to get over yourself. You did the things you did, it's all part of the growing process, own it. Rather than unravel all these complicated things, just be ok.

  • Something to think about in addition to the embarrassing privacy concerns that she brought up. A lot of parents will tag their child's location in the pictures they post and may inadvertently give bad people clues as to where the child hangs out. If a predator wanted to know what park or what neighborhood

    Something to think about in addition to the embarrassing privacy concerns that she brought up. A lot of parents will tag their child's location in the pictures they post and may inadvertently give bad people clues as to where the child hangs out. If a predator wanted to know what park or what neighborhood a child hung out at, it may be as simple as looking at the tagged locations from parents' posts.

  • ‘I had just turned 13, and I thought I was just beginning my public online life, when in fact there were hundreds of pictures and stories of me that, would live on the internet forever, whether I wanted it to be or not, and I didn’t have control over it. I was furious; I felt betrayed and lied to.’

    ‘I had just turned 13, and I thought I was just beginning my public online life, when in fact there were hundreds of pictures and stories of me that, would live on the internet forever, whether I wanted it to be or not, and I didn’t have control over it. I was furious; I felt betrayed and lied to.’

    Makes sense to have felt that way but am i the only one that is thinking ‘let’s not pretend this is the norm?’ At least in my circle, asking permission before posting anyone of any age has been the practice. Outside of public events that are being photographed by third parties of course.

  • As we already know, social media has become a mega-giant in the lives of everyday people. There are millions of people whom, post videos, photos, podcast etc... People need to understand that social media has dissimilar effects upon each individual. Some people do not care if there picture is posted

    As we already know, social media has become a mega-giant in the lives of everyday people. There are millions of people whom, post videos, photos, podcast etc... People need to understand that social media has dissimilar effects upon each individual. Some people do not care if there picture is posted on a social media platform; while some people have a distaste for the idea all together. She just happen to be one of those people who don’t like there personal business displayed for millions to see.

  • In my 30s I feel I should post all my childhood photos to my facebook to preserve a record. Even the ones in which my aunts and cousin sisters dressed me as a bride. 😂

  • This is a perspective I've never considered... my parents didn't have social media and so I never experienced this from the child's point of view... but I definitely feel like I should reevaluate my own posting practices where my children are concerned

  • I like social media mostly for the platform to stay connected and to inform. I think those are some of its best purposes.

  • As someone welcomed to the ranks of Facebook in its early campuses-only model, I saw the impact of "impulsive" social posting early on when classmates were getting turned down for work positions due to the "lifestyle they advertise through social media" (ie. partying, marijuana use, BDSM interest, strong

    As someone welcomed to the ranks of Facebook in its early campuses-only model, I saw the impact of "impulsive" social posting early on when classmates were getting turned down for work positions due to the "lifestyle they advertise through social media" (ie. partying, marijuana use, BDSM interest, strong political views on either side, you name it....) If you put it there, it can be found, and back then employers found it to be a wonderful new tool in vetting applicants, as we were veiled in a false sense of community, camaraderie, and privacy from those outside our peer group.

    Are companies in the wrong to turn these people down for employment because of what they do outside of business hours? These companies are concerned with protecting their brand. Now these employees have become an extension of that brand. It's their safer bet to just say no.

    Be more cognizant of what you're posting. Respect the privacy and future of those too young to make those choices. Take steps to protect your own privacy. Teach your children good habits and respect from the start. Not everything is meant to be shared with the world. And not everything is yours to share.

    Think twice before you hit submit.

  • Another point, great story was done a few yrs back by the Seattle Police Dept. very evil & dangerous people look at family pictures of kids and in a predatory fashion would pick up things like comments “ kids are home alone for 1/2 hr some days, they’d see a picture of a tree house with kids then notice

    Another point, great story was done a few yrs back by the Seattle Police Dept. very evil & dangerous people look at family pictures of kids and in a predatory fashion would pick up things like comments “ kids are home alone for 1/2 hr some days, they’d see a picture of a tree house with kids then notice a gate open in the yard WIERD stuff , the police put out a little doc on this, we must be aware & vigilant ! Heard a guy joke that when the telephone first became common it wasn’t long before scary guys were terrifying women with awful calls , technology and the “ base nature of mankind” yuk !

  • I think all parents and older siblings should read this. It's easy to get caught up in the culture of over sharing and forget the concept of consent.

  • Maybe 13 is too young. Maybe not.

  • This seems like an allegory.

  • I think that on the world today, social media is here to stay and as much as I do not need it, it has become a part of this society. It is better to teach the youth before they start having "emotions" on how to deal with what they will encounter so the "shock of it" does not cause irreparable harm which

    I think that on the world today, social media is here to stay and as much as I do not need it, it has become a part of this society. It is better to teach the youth before they start having "emotions" on how to deal with what they will encounter so the "shock of it" does not cause irreparable harm which can snowball into darker aspects of social media.

  • I as a parent stayed off social media up until a little more than a year ago to respect my daughter's world! Didn't want to be the spying parent..I gave her all the space in the world then a little more than a year ago she told me to get on Facebook for God sake cuz it's just her and mom-friends now

    I as a parent stayed off social media up until a little more than a year ago to respect my daughter's world! Didn't want to be the spying parent..I gave her all the space in the world then a little more than a year ago she told me to get on Facebook for God sake cuz it's just her and mom-friends now (all grown up)..We just brag about our kids successes now and share very funny things and food we cook.. We were fortunate to not experience any IED's..This girl is soooo smart and is going to be fine..scientists say people have lived for up to 3yrs without social media !

  • "Teens get a lot of warnings that we aren’t mature enough to understand that everything we post online is permanent, but parents should also reflect about their use of social media and how it could potentially impact their children’s lives as we become young adults."

  • o poder da rede social??

  • Yes it is true