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What it’s like to paint in space—according to a NASA astronaut

By Quartz

"Painting was a real process. To start, I would squirt out a tiny little ball of water from the drink bag and watch it float in front of me in zero gravityRead full story

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  • Enjoyed thinking again of how much I enjoyed the opportunity to paint in space, and the wonderful opportunities it’s opened up since coming back to Earth. Hope everyone will ck out the Space for Art Foundation #space #art #healing

  • Ever wondered what it’s like to paint in space?

    I worked with former NASA astronaut Nicole Stott on this piece about watercoloring in zero gravity aboard the ISS. Spoiler: It’s *much* harder—and much cooler—than you think.

    "Without a cup of water for my watercolors, painting was therefore a real process. To start, I would squirt out a tiny little ball of water from the drink bag and watch it float in front of me in zero gravity. Then I would put the brush toward it to touch it."

    But the takeaway

    Ever wondered what it’s like to paint in space?

    I worked with former NASA astronaut Nicole Stott on this piece about watercoloring in zero gravity aboard the ISS. Spoiler: It’s *much* harder—and much cooler—than you think.

    "Without a cup of water for my watercolors, painting was therefore a real process. To start, I would squirt out a tiny little ball of water from the drink bag and watch it float in front of me in zero gravity. Then I would put the brush toward it to touch it."

    But the takeaway of this article isn't about smooshing a ball of water around in paint while hurtling space: It's about how we shouldn't separate the sciences and the arts. Left-brain/right-brain theory has been throughly debunked, and you only have to look at the diverse creativity of NASA's cohort to see that.

  • Come visit the @Astro_Nicole painting @airandspace - art and design power #STEM

  • Fascinating article! Never thought about how different it would be to paint in zero-gravity.

    “I decided I wanted to raise the awareness of the beautiful intersection between art and science. I wanted to encourage more young people to not be led down a path that pigeonholes them as only artistic or scientific. Whether it’s the way art has always been used to better communicate scientific data, science fiction that’s led to science fact, or simply that our planet and our spacecraft are beautiful

    Fascinating article! Never thought about how different it would be to paint in zero-gravity.

    “I decided I wanted to raise the awareness of the beautiful intersection between art and science. I wanted to encourage more young people to not be led down a path that pigeonholes them as only artistic or scientific. Whether it’s the way art has always been used to better communicate scientific data, science fiction that’s led to science fact, or simply that our planet and our spacecraft are beautiful pieces of art in their own right, art and science are more connected than what we give them credit for.”

  • A fascinating and fun read!

  • Sandra K🙂🤗

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