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Is Therapy Only for People With “Real” Problems?

By Slate Magazine

Pretty much everyone should be in therapy, probablyRead full story

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  • ‘“Maybe You Should Talk to Someone” counters this particular issue by following a small handful of Gottlieb’s patients’ therapeutic journeys alongside her own journey as a therapist and as a patient.’

    The shifting perspective sounds interesting.

    As someone who’s only engaged with therapy from afar

    ‘“Maybe You Should Talk to Someone” counters this particular issue by following a small handful of Gottlieb’s patients’ therapeutic journeys alongside her own journey as a therapist and as a patient.’

    The shifting perspective sounds interesting.

    As someone who’s only engaged with therapy from afar, I imagine we’re over the stigma that used to surround it. As well as understanding it’s something anyone can take advantage of for whatever period of time they deem necessary.

  • In our Harris Poll with The American Psychological Association, Gen Z is more likely to report their mental health as fair or poor (27%) vs. Millennials (15%), Gen Xers (13%), Boomers (7%) or older adults (5%). And more than one third of Gen Z (37%) report they receive or have received treatment or therapy

    In our Harris Poll with The American Psychological Association, Gen Z is more likely to report their mental health as fair or poor (27%) vs. Millennials (15%), Gen Xers (13%), Boomers (7%) or older adults (5%). And more than one third of Gen Z (37%) report they receive or have received treatment or therapy from a psychologist or other mental health professional vs (25%) of older adults on average.

    Yes Gen Z says therapy is for everyone and we shouldn’t stigmatize it.

  • Such a good read, and good therapy too.

  • I have always wondered what the definition of "real problems" is. It seems to connote that only the mentally ill or dysfunctional have "real problems," while anyone else has um, "fake problems?" Problems are problems, period. Additionally, no one can really claim to be fully mentally sound and healthy

    I have always wondered what the definition of "real problems" is. It seems to connote that only the mentally ill or dysfunctional have "real problems," while anyone else has um, "fake problems?" Problems are problems, period. Additionally, no one can really claim to be fully mentally sound and healthy in today's world, especially with issues like ecological disaster at the forefront. I'm all for life coaching as well, which is more like an experienced and knowledgeable friend for hire than a clinician.

  • I've benefitted immensely from years of therapy, and I've always thought everyone should try it. That said, the proliferation of life coaches came out of the notion that therapists treat sick people and coaches help healthy people grow and thrive.

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