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The key to loving your job in the age of burnout

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  • Also important to consider that “meaning” in ones work doesn’t have to be synonymous with work that is inherently “giving.” Finding meaning in work is just about knowing what fuels you. And we should find ways to be fueled outside of work too. But they don’t have to be mutually exclusive of each other either.

  • Life is multi-faceted. So important to find the meaning (the why) in what you do, in an inclusive environment, while still be able to wear the different hats in life.

  • A good reminder that we are all authors of our own destiny. Clarifying your “why” at work allows you to take ownership of your narrative and build a mindset that can enable your productivity and happiness. Not easy, but worth it.

  • Illuminating article. When “imagined communities” (to use the late Ben Anderson’s term) — nation states, professions — broke down, we need to ask more questions. It’s Socratic: examine one’s life often.

  • My graduate research was on fostering a sense of purpose in career development among high schoolers. At the time, I met an attorney who hated his job "shuffling papers." He would have rather been an immigration lawyer than working in the corporate sector. His job, though, allowed him to send his extended

    My graduate research was on fostering a sense of purpose in career development among high schoolers. At the time, I met an attorney who hated his job "shuffling papers." He would have rather been an immigration lawyer than working in the corporate sector. His job, though, allowed him to send his extended family to college. He was the prime example that to find purpose in our work, we each have to weigh what is most important to us and make sure it aligns with our cultural values.

  • Or go the other way - find your meaning (your why), then find work - or create work - that is in alignment with your meaning. If you can do that you’ll love what you do.

    Many people have selected their occupation based on earning potential and other meaningless factors, like image. But they are unhappy

    Or go the other way - find your meaning (your why), then find work - or create work - that is in alignment with your meaning. If you can do that you’ll love what you do.

    Many people have selected their occupation based on earning potential and other meaningless factors, like image. But they are unhappy, not that the work is necessarily bad or boring or whatever- but the work is not in alignment or support of their why.

    And work that’s not in alignment with your why will always be a problem- even if you are not yet aware of what your why is or don’t even know that you have one. It’s a form of not being true to yourself. Of course there’s a lot of unhappiness and burnout. But there’s a lot of blissful alignment as well. You either get it or you don’t. Perhaps we are having fewer people left in the middle; you’re either out of alignment and burned out, miserable, or depressed; or you’re in alignment and wondering what the hell’s wrong with everyone else.

  • Reminiscent of the work from Marx and Engels on alienation and anomie. Interesting that what is avoided in the article is a discussion, or a lack of a discussion about structural functionalist issues relating to conflict. While the examples are very different from any of the issues that are behind recent

    Reminiscent of the work from Marx and Engels on alienation and anomie. Interesting that what is avoided in the article is a discussion, or a lack of a discussion about structural functionalist issues relating to conflict. While the examples are very different from any of the issues that are behind recent demonstrations, not just the Gilets Jaunes in France, the fundamental issues are still similar to Marx, Engels & Weber.

  • No matter what you have to do in life for money or do for fun sometimes you have to clean your shoes because you stepped in something . When you're through with that find something better that you enjoy.

  • “Meaning isn’t something to be found, and it can’t be uncovered by heartfelt commitment, long hours, and self-sacrifice. Meaning is something we make.”

  • Meaning making is all about framing, framing our mindsets, framing our point of view, framing our lived experiences, loved this piece, it’s thoughtful and not prescriptive.

  • Fulfillment requires that the job have meaning. Burnout often comes when the job doesn’t. So much “work” today is soul-destroying worthlessness.

  • Meaning isn’t something to be found, and it can’t be uncovered by heartfelt commitment, long hours, and self-sacrifice. Meaning is something we make.

  • It’s a code that’s hard to crack. Companies investing heavily in employee engagement initiatives and individuals hopping to and from positions, roles and jobs in a search for meaning and reward.

    “But the narrative of entitlement to a fulfilling job obscures the fact that it’s not our job’s job to be

    It’s a code that’s hard to crack. Companies investing heavily in employee engagement initiatives and individuals hopping to and from positions, roles and jobs in a search for meaning and reward.

    “But the narrative of entitlement to a fulfilling job obscures the fact that it’s not our job’s job to be meaningful. It’s our job to find meaning in what we do.”

    They key I find is the partnership between the individual and the company/job. We can work in silos to solve burnout and establish meaning, but I believe the answer lies in improving the mechanisms for dialogue and personalization of workplace growth between the employee and the employer. It is 2019. With the tools, strategies, models and tech at our disposal, companies should strive toward personalizing the work experience for their talent. Creating experience models tailored to individuals preferences, skills and potential. The answer and future lies in personalization.

  • Article author jumping in with some responses. There’s a core of people here who share a view that work isn’t some amorphous ‘other’, but rather that it’s part of us, and therefore to at least some degree that we’re in control of it. I like Arturo Siguenza’s point that a possible future for work is in

    Article author jumping in with some responses. There’s a core of people here who share a view that work isn’t some amorphous ‘other’, but rather that it’s part of us, and therefore to at least some degree that we’re in control of it. I like Arturo Siguenza’s point that a possible future for work is in much greater personalisation. Technology should indeed make that possible.

    I also take the point some people - including Weiyee IN - have made, that

    there’s a big counterargument: many people are truly stuck in unfulfilling jobs without the privilege of being able to change their circumstances or find their ‘because.’ I hope I acknowledged that. But I also wanted to concentrate on the (many) people who DO have choice.

  • "Meaning isn’t something to be found, and it can’t be uncovered by heartfelt commitment, long hours, and self-sacrifice. Meaning is something we make."

  • Meaning is made by putting in the time to be excellent and to hone your craft. 💪🏼

  • Meaning is personal and not one thing. Life is too complex for one thing to satisfy for very long. Find meaning in today, let tomorrow take care of itself. Move in the direction of your truth and heart.

  • Thought-provoking essay about how to the find meaning in your work no matter what—or where—it is.

  • Burnout happens, I am sure most of us have been there. Sure, it can be relational to a good degree.

    However, I find folks are encouraged to either stay or leave a company when asked the below style of questioning during job burnout:

    ‘What motivated you to interview with us?’

    ‘To be patient during the

    Burnout happens, I am sure most of us have been there. Sure, it can be relational to a good degree.

    However, I find folks are encouraged to either stay or leave a company when asked the below style of questioning during job burnout:

    ‘What motivated you to interview with us?’

    ‘To be patient during the hiring process?’

    ‘The drive to get that promotion?’

    ...you get the idea.

    This type of questioning allows a better understanding of the burned out employees’ reality while providing that employee with a sense of comfort if a genuine approached is used.

    These questions can also remove your superior badge, allowing you to continue your own personal and professional growth based on your employee’s transparent responses.

  • The key to this is something very few people are willing to admit in the “Age of Burnout”. That is: we don’t live in that time at all. We live in the Age of Can’t Cope/Won’t Cope... people just need to stop moaning and get on with it.

  • The privilege and freedom of the post industrial economy has invited a world wide search for meaning in our work. This article sheds light on important pieces of a growing conversation centered around a mindset which is moving towards aligning the value of our work and what we value in life. There is

    The privilege and freedom of the post industrial economy has invited a world wide search for meaning in our work. This article sheds light on important pieces of a growing conversation centered around a mindset which is moving towards aligning the value of our work and what we value in life. There is always a trade off, some sacrifice made for reward gained. Therefore, we should actively engage in understanding and committing to an arrangement that meets our needs.

  • Right

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