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Alessandro Cripsta

Good evening.

Up, up, and away

A jumpsuit for space tourism. Virgin Galactic and Under Armour collaborated on a one-piece suit, underwear, and boot set for those who book an Enterprise spaceflight ticket.

The first commercial spacesuits are like soft, high-tech pajamas

I love the way the spacewear looks and I love the way it feels. I also love the fact that the next time I put it on, I will be on my way to space.

One of my favorite bits from the unveiling that didn't make it into the story was when Tom Westray, creative director at Virgin Galactic, likened the space suit to a wedding dress. "We realized that this suit is created for this one day," he said—like a wedding dress. It led them to consider reusability

One of my favorite bits from the unveiling that didn't make it into the story was when Tom Westray, creative director at Virgin Galactic, likened the space suit to a wedding dress. "We realized that this suit is created for this one day," he said—like a wedding dress. It led them to consider reusability in the design. Not sure how many people will be wearing them around after, but the designers hope they will at least sometimes.

Saving WeWork

WeWork is getting a lifeline. SoftBank Group and JP Morgan both have plans to bail out the struggling office-sharing company, CNBC reports. WeWork's board will review the proposals by the end of the week and opt for one or a combination.

SoftBank, JP Morgan to submit separate WeWork bailout proposals in coming days

WeWork is a textbook example of a flawed Silicon Valley start-up. All of this talk of funding and valuation is a way of say that the business was built irrespective of the revenue they got from customers. It would seem that WeWork has (metaphorically) built an empire of solid gold toilets and now investors

WeWork is a textbook example of a flawed Silicon Valley start-up. All of this talk of funding and valuation is a way of say that the business was built irrespective of the revenue they got from customers. It would seem that WeWork has (metaphorically) built an empire of solid gold toilets and now investors are surprised that they can’t get enough customers in the door to keep the lights on.

What I never hear discussed in these talk about wavering SV companies is whether customers are buying their product. Have you looked at the price of a spot in a WeWork office? It’s astronomical for someone starting a small business and apparently the current price point isn’t even enough to cover the costs of goods (I.e. office space) much less turn a profit. Golden toilets.

The Guardian reported that WeWork is close to laying off close to 2,000 employees. But I'm not sure if cutting costs, even at that rate, is going to save the company. It also makes me wonder how a fairly simple business—renting co-working spaces—spiraled out of control. Even though SoftBank has given

The Guardian reported that WeWork is close to laying off close to 2,000 employees. But I'm not sure if cutting costs, even at that rate, is going to save the company. It also makes me wonder how a fairly simple business—renting co-working spaces—spiraled out of control. Even though SoftBank has given WeWork close to $11 billion, the company might be beyond rescue. Hard to say whether SoftBank's throwing good money after bad. Right now, all WeWork has going for it is the company's existing contracts & what's left of its brand. The next month will be intriguing to watch.

Quartz at work

There’s a new generation of networking groups for people of color. Niche social spaces providing a place to get advice, consult with others, network, and vent about work situations, are on the rise.

The impact of workspaces for people of color go beyond feeling welcome

Being the only one in a whatever dominant space is mental gymnastics and can become exhausting (it's a psychological workout!). Anyone's that's spent a significant period in a space as "the other" know this exact feeling. Culture is complex. It's nuanced and full of cues, etiquette, decorum -- unspoken

Being the only one in a whatever dominant space is mental gymnastics and can become exhausting (it's a psychological workout!). Anyone's that's spent a significant period in a space as "the other" know this exact feeling. Culture is complex. It's nuanced and full of cues, etiquette, decorum -- unspoken and explicit. Trying to learn all the rules and perform them perfectly puts one in a state of "constant translating" as one of my colleagues aptly described. Now couple this state of existence with the historical power structures that create a specific cultural dominance in the corporate and white-collar workplaces. The mere appearance of a diverse workspace isn't inclusivity. Culture manifests in the shows discussed the next day, the humor, language and colloquialisms (code-switching), ideas valued, food eaten in the office, promotions, perception of intelligence, opportunities given, salary, and in media (my industry) the stories considered worth telling. I could go on as this is a complex topic, but TDLR, a place of respite to lay my head and rub minds with folks whom I share similar culture and experience is much needed.

Look, diversity is hard work. It’s a two-way dialogue that requires indomitable humility and incessant curiosity. The world is so big. And in the workplace where foreign backgrounds and experiences clash — let them clash and create new conversations and relationships. Sometimes, you gotta ditch the bagel for some jollof rice. They’re both carbs.

I recommend several NPR’s Code Switch episodes:

1. You Are What You Eat: This week, we tackle reader questions on vegetarianism, the specter of grocery store Columbuses, and the quiet opprobrium directed at "smelly ethnic foods" in the workplace.

2. Respect Yourself - “What does "civility" look like and who gets to define it? What about "respectable" behavior? This week, we're looking at how behavior gets policed in public.”

3. Getting a Foot in the Door - Anali, a young woman from Los Angeles, wants to break into the film industry. A local program taught her the skills of the trade and the language, but will any of that that matter in an industry that runs mostly on connections?”

4. Talk American - What is the “Standard American Accent?" Where is it from? And what does it mean if you don’t have it. Code Switch goes on a trip to the Midwest of find out.

US-China tech diplomacy

Apple users in China: Beware. Privacy advocates worry about the US tech giant’s partnership with Tencent, which has close ties to Beijing, as they think it could share the IP addresses of internet users who try to visit blacklisted sites.

Apple’s data sharing with firms tied to the Chinese government may endanger dissidents

Have you visited a fraudulent site? If so, you likely got a warning from Google. But in China, users get warnings from Tencent, a co. close to the Chinese government. Thus, a service meant to protect users could threaten their freedom. Staying safe (and private) is hard.

The World in 50 Years

Apple's Indian revival

Marking 30 years of the web

The mysterious sounds that defined the early days of the internet. Before we were always online, logging on to the internet was a journey through sound. Here’s what those sounds actually meant.

A series of mysterious bleeps and bloops defined the early days of the Internet

The dial up sound was the soundtrack to a very distinct period in my life, and I never thought about that until I saw a video of the reactions of kids who had never heard it. I found this piece deeply satisfying for a question I never knew I had.

My dad worked on satellites when I was a kid, so my house was an early adopter of many things—including dial-up. I’d constantly request my dad “make the computers talk”—I was obsessed with the sounds modems made! I didn’t realize till I read this article how spot-on my childhood simplification was.

Locked up in America

Stop the presses

Surprising discovery

Come back soon!

Close
Trump meets with Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, discusses 'health of public conversation'

Trump meets with Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, discusses 'health of public conversation'

Read more on NBC News

From Our Members

  • Social media must be the great experiment of the early 21st century. We are testing the bounds of good and extremely bad behavior, of social conscience, of constitutional privilege, the quality of education and application thereof by the user base (this includes accepting as truth those statements that

    Social media must be the great experiment of the early 21st century. We are testing the bounds of good and extremely bad behavior, of social conscience, of constitutional privilege, the quality of education and application thereof by the user base (this includes accepting as truth those statements that contradict themselves by their mere appearance in the media), the absurd nature of choices we pursue from our own self-righteous points of view, and how absurd it is to view being a shareholder of such a platform as a benchmark of intellectual and financial success.

    Freedom to express is also the obligation to express responsibly. Capitalizing on the vehement and incredibly absurd rantings that would classify most anyone else as mentally ill and in need of in-patient care should be left to novels, science fiction, the dystopian ramblings of out-of-work writers. We have lost touch with history and we have thrown away civility. These cannot be reconstructed out of the anarchy and wholesale merchandising of the activities and thought processes fleshed out and packaged via deep analytics that social media platforms are best at selling.

    Many years ago, in its infancy, Twitter was the gem of SXSW. Now it’s just the tarnished commercial grade diamond on the drill-bit grinding out someone else’s cash flow.

  • There is a popular comment on this article that essentially applauds Dorsey's appeasement of Trump's vile, incoherent, ignorant, and violent discourse on Twitter. The comment says that "Losing POTUS would be detrimental for Twitter engagement, so getting closer in a proactive dialogue is smart."

    So

    There is a popular comment on this article that essentially applauds Dorsey's appeasement of Trump's vile, incoherent, ignorant, and violent discourse on Twitter. The comment says that "Losing POTUS would be detrimental for Twitter engagement, so getting closer in a proactive dialogue is smart."

    So the implication is that engagement, as in virality, is what we should value -- moreso than upholding public discourse that is civil, open-minded, respectful, thoughtful, etc.

    Shame on Dorsey for appeasing toxicity on his platform in the name of free speech. The leaders of the social media world have been far too eager to sit back and absolve themselves of blame in the acceleration of toxicity, hostility, polarization, and incivility that social media has caused.

  • Losing POTUS would be detrimental for Twitter engagement, so getting closer in a proactive dialogue is smart. And regardless of today’s results and market reaction, the secular trends still don’t favor Twitter’s long term financial prospects. The company sits pretty with 300m monthly users, but ultimately

    Losing POTUS would be detrimental for Twitter engagement, so getting closer in a proactive dialogue is smart. And regardless of today’s results and market reaction, the secular trends still don’t favor Twitter’s long term financial prospects. The company sits pretty with 300m monthly users, but ultimately the value is based on how much incremental value they can continue to extract from the daily base despite short term gains. Plus the valuation is scary high.

  • “‘Blocking a world leader from Twitter or removing their controversial Tweets would hide important information people should be able to see and debate,’ the company wrote. ‘It would also not silence that leader, but it would certainly hamper necessary discussion around their words and actions.’”

    Dorsey

    “‘Blocking a world leader from Twitter or removing their controversial Tweets would hide important information people should be able to see and debate,’ the company wrote. ‘It would also not silence that leader, but it would certainly hamper necessary discussion around their words and actions.’”

    Dorsey is savvy enough to recognize not to kill the proverbial golden goose. For all the crass and repugnant tirades unleashed by Trump over the last several years, it may be the best thing ever to happen to Twitter. The platform is perpetually relevant, one of the greatest avenues for breaking news, making news, covering events in real-time on the ground, and with eyes perpetually focused upon it.

    For Dorsey and Twitter it may be a Faustian bargain, but it’s one they cannot refuse.

  • What an interesting line @Jack is walking. He left a frustrated crowd last week at TED where he dodged a number of questions around how Twitter would improve the platform and address the spread of hate and misinformation.

    This week he's expected to answer directly to the President for decreased follower

    What an interesting line @Jack is walking. He left a frustrated crowd last week at TED where he dodged a number of questions around how Twitter would improve the platform and address the spread of hate and misinformation.

    This week he's expected to answer directly to the President for decreased follower counts resulting from tighter rules on the removal of hate accounts and bots...

    https://www.ted.com/talks/jack_dorsey_how_twitter_needs_to_change/up-next

  • Both sides benefit from this discussion. Trump "appears" to care about the health and truth of online conversation, Jack keeps POTUS sweet (a cash cow for Twitter) in the lead up to the next election and gets ahead of the game on a growing negative sentiment for how social platforms are influencing society

    Both sides benefit from this discussion. Trump "appears" to care about the health and truth of online conversation, Jack keeps POTUS sweet (a cash cow for Twitter) in the lead up to the next election and gets ahead of the game on a growing negative sentiment for how social platforms are influencing society. Will Trump change his bullying rhetoric online and will Twitter make positive changes to their platform like changing how the thumbs up is used to steer away from personal praise/ punishment? Sigh I wish I could say I had some faith...

  • his weird diet and intense meditation will be cast in a new light if it gives him the intestinal fortitude to make dramatic decisions like banning heads of state.

  • Although @realdonaldtrump does not have nearly the popularity of @katyperry or even @barakobama he has already surpassed @twitter @nytimes @cnn and @cnnbrk and that is significant. Regardless if one agrees or disagrees with his posts he is the single conservative voice in the top thirty Twitter feeds

    Although @realdonaldtrump does not have nearly the popularity of @katyperry or even @barakobama he has already surpassed @twitter @nytimes @cnn and @cnnbrk and that is significant. Regardless if one agrees or disagrees with his posts he is the single conservative voice in the top thirty Twitter feeds, and if we (USA) are to be true to diversity and inclusion in the public conversation, he deserves to have a voice.

  • It’s either yoga, meditation or fasting. Doubt there’s much else to talk about.

  • Whenever an article appears with Trunp in the headline I notice the comments split (excuse my convenient hyperbole) 50/50 between those who comment intellectually with proper attempt to be objective and those who dogmatically oppose or support trump. Let's leave the latter behind on Quartz and pursue the former.

  • Letting Trump diagnose the health of public discourse is like letting a lunatic run an asylum. Certainly I understand why Dorsey would accept the invitation and probably he did a lot of meditation and ice bathing in preparation, but the notion of these two fellows in a room together is a hoot and not at all reassuring.

  • According to multiple reports, Trump spent a lot of time moaning about lost followers. Dorsey had to repeatedly explain that they were mostly bots.

  • Jack explained how he established our health of conversation in TED last week. His conversation in TED is already on TED.com

  • I wonder if it’s a new podcast? He seems to have done everyone else’s recently...

  • This is probably going to be one of those meetings you could have skipped.

  • The meeting seems to have concluded, per WH sources to several news organizations.

    I think this is an interesting bit: "The meeting comes after an invitation from the White House, the email adds." Will we hear details of the meeting from either side?

  • Someone like Michael Bloomberg should do a hostile take over of Twitter just to shut it down. Would be a good use of his money. The problem with public discourse is how short it is. Short thinking tweaks anger. Twitter is all about short thought, not deep thought.

  • Odd couple at least in terms of diet

  • The fear/anger in public discourse is endemic to our society, at this moment in history. The return of civil discourse will take a very long time. We who treasure civility must continue to be kind, respectful of others, in short, civil.

    Hopefully the agonizingly slow progress of our society's character

    The fear/anger in public discourse is endemic to our society, at this moment in history. The return of civil discourse will take a very long time. We who treasure civility must continue to be kind, respectful of others, in short, civil.

    Hopefully the agonizingly slow progress of our society's character will catch up with us, eventually...

  • I keep hearing about "the loss of civility" as if something new and bad has happened. That is as quaint a notion as believing that the world once looked like a Norman Rockwell painting. American political discourse has ALWAYS been full-throated, loud and abusive. What has changed is how easy it is for

    I keep hearing about "the loss of civility" as if something new and bad has happened. That is as quaint a notion as believing that the world once looked like a Norman Rockwell painting. American political discourse has ALWAYS been full-throated, loud and abusive. What has changed is how easy it is for 'everyman' to participate in the ruckus. Read political essays from newspapers 50, 100 and 200 years ago and you won't find much 'civility'.

  • Even thought Trump is right about the left wing Silicon Valley small minded bubble they espouse and sensor conservativs on their social media platforms, I'd have to agree that Trump wasn't the right person to address the poison those companies are pouring into the online community. He is the right person

    Even thought Trump is right about the left wing Silicon Valley small minded bubble they espouse and sensor conservativs on their social media platforms, I'd have to agree that Trump wasn't the right person to address the poison those companies are pouring into the online community. He is the right person however to hold them accountable for the bias they obviously enforce. There are enough independent reviews of the sensorship they practice in favor of leftist mob-think.