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Zack Rosebrugh

Good morning.

Net positive

The Apple icons you see today have surprisingly ancient roots. Susan Kare designed the icons for Apple’s first computer, the Macintosh; many are still in use today. To create these early icons, Kare drew inspiration from surprising sources, from Swedish campgrounds to ancient hieroglyphics.

The Apple icons you see today have surprisingly ancient roots

This is so cool—the friendly design of early Apple icons made computers much more appealing to consumers.

The internet, contrary to how many of us think of it, is not a self-propagating entity—it’s created and shaped by humans. Susan has had an outsized impact in the way we experienced the web, both in its early days and today.

Last-minute Brexit deal

Even Europeans don’t agree on what the “European way of life” is

Even Europeans don’t agree on what the “European way of life” is

Collecting data for this piece led to some real surprises for me, including when I learned that 45% of Lithuanians disagreed or strongly disagreed with the statement "Gay men and lesbians should be free to live their own life as they wish." That seems to contradict the belief of the incoming EU Commission

Collecting data for this piece led to some real surprises for me, including when I learned that 45% of Lithuanians disagreed or strongly disagreed with the statement "Gay men and lesbians should be free to live their own life as they wish." That seems to contradict the belief of the incoming EU Commission that there is a "shared European way of life" to protect. If so, what is it?

What comes after the iPhone?

Can Apple do it again? The iPhone turned Apple from a successful computer company into the world’s most profitable consumer electronics operation. But as this Quartz member exclusive shows, its success could also spell Apple’s undoing.

Can Apple do it again?

Apple is at crossroads. It revolutionized the way we communicate with the iPhone nearly 13 years ago, but its longtime cash cow has started to waver. Apple has a host of new bets in the works, some that could also change the world as the iPhone did. But will any of them actually be able to do it?

Apple is currently a perfect example of a business case where a company which itself creates a high bar that it become de facto standard and is now at crossroads as it hasn't been able to repeat its same success.

Consumers are looking for beyond mobile phone for sure. Hence very interesting to watch

Apple is currently a perfect example of a business case where a company which itself creates a high bar that it become de facto standard and is now at crossroads as it hasn't been able to repeat its same success.

Consumers are looking for beyond mobile phone for sure. Hence very interesting to watch as to how they would turn it around by either building a full ecosystem of products/services or new revolutionary ideas.

I don't think apple will be able to come up with a product as influential as the Iphone was to its quarterly revenue. The focus should really be on the apple ecosystem (apple pay, music, tv...etc). This would mean selling the iphone at an even cheaper price to allow users to embrace apple services. This

I don't think apple will be able to come up with a product as influential as the Iphone was to its quarterly revenue. The focus should really be on the apple ecosystem (apple pay, music, tv...etc). This would mean selling the iphone at an even cheaper price to allow users to embrace apple services. This is the most sensible strategy in the near term while they work on the next big thing which may not be big after all.

I see hope that Apple will soon re-imagine the mobile device again. Consumers are craving a new way, simpler method of connecting and communicating. Stagnant iPhone growth shows that we’ve hit a wall of all the doo dads and new wrappers that simply boost the current experience. But I see a glimmer of

I see hope that Apple will soon re-imagine the mobile device again. Consumers are craving a new way, simpler method of connecting and communicating. Stagnant iPhone growth shows that we’ve hit a wall of all the doo dads and new wrappers that simply boost the current experience. But I see a glimmer of change with Apple’s introduction of screen time, grayscale, health monitoring, which potentially forecasts the company’s testing of a new experience that combats the addictive tech dependencies and negative impacts of its tentpole product. Holding out hope for a re-imagining as Apple approaches an anniversary year :)

Desi digital

Chinese democracy

Google spells out its future

Google wants to be more sustainable, but... The tech giant debuted several new devices at its hardware event today, few of which seem very recyclable.

Google wants to be more sustainable—nevermind all the new products it announced

The main thrust of Google's new product event today was to raise awareness to the way it and other manufacturers produce devices for mass consumption. It's making products from recycled plastic, and wants to offset emission costs from its partners. At the same time, it introduced a whole bunch of new

The main thrust of Google's new product event today was to raise awareness to the way it and other manufacturers produce devices for mass consumption. It's making products from recycled plastic, and wants to offset emission costs from its partners. At the same time, it introduced a whole bunch of new devices, many of which don't seem particularly repairable or that different than what's come before. How do you square that circle?

The best tech news I've heard today: "Much like Amazon's newest Echo products, users can ask Google Assistant on the hub to turn off wifi access to specific devices connected to the network, meaning parents can wield a new level of tyranny over unruly kids and their connected devices."

Including recycled materials in device design is all well and good, but real sustainability will mean creating repairable, upgradable gadgets. Project Ara's modular smartphone always seemed like a bit of a pipe dream, and its death in 2016 wasn't a huge surprise. But long-term, could Google resurrect a similar concept?

Cord cutters corner

AMC Theatres joins the streaming wars. The world’s largest movie theater chain announced a streaming service to rent or buy films from major Hollywood studios, Business Insider reports.

AMC Theatres is getting into the streaming business with a new on-demand service

I don’t see this as a streaming play from AMC but more as insurance for their physical locations. As more content producers create their own streaming services, the physical theaters lose the stronghold they’ve had on distribution. By having a streaming service of their own, AMC can hold their physical

I don’t see this as a streaming play from AMC but more as insurance for their physical locations. As more content producers create their own streaming services, the physical theaters lose the stronghold they’ve had on distribution. By having a streaming service of their own, AMC can hold their physical theater infrastructure (which still makes gobs of money for content owners like Disney) at ransom by requiring a share of the streaming rights in order to show movies in their physical theaters. The physical infrastructure of theaters across the nation is still the most profitable asset for now, and AMC just outsmarted the streaming wars.

With half a dozen major streaming services online by year's end, consumers are going to have to make decisions about which they are willing to pay for. The services that have the clearest identity are likely in the best position. That benefits HBO and Disney+. The identity of an AMC channel is a lot murkier.

Retail roundup

Quartz at work

There are many paths to a dream career. Like studying salamanders in isolation, for example. The solitude of science helped podcast host Arielle Duhaime-Ross come to an important professional realization.

To find your dream career, try studying salamanders in isolation

This story resonates for me. Started my career as a Natural Resource scientist and manager. Mid-career pivot to leadership development coach. Turns out there are a lot of social skills one develops when promoting policy and management with multiple stakeholders.

See you later, friends!

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Twitter Is Not America

Twitter Is Not America

Read more on The Atlantic

From Our Members

  • I can’t agree more. The reality is that social media is fantastic at showcasing extremes. It gives a voice to those who suggest and propagate the most extreme conspiracy theories, ideas and concepts.

    Ever wonder why you see things like ‘Q-anon,’ ‘Anti-vaccination’ and other nonsense like that in droves

    I can’t agree more. The reality is that social media is fantastic at showcasing extremes. It gives a voice to those who suggest and propagate the most extreme conspiracy theories, ideas and concepts.

    Ever wonder why you see things like ‘Q-anon,’ ‘Anti-vaccination’ and other nonsense like that in droves on social media? It’s because it’s a breeding ground for extremes, a place for people to come and share their greatest fears and desires.

    I firmly believe that twitter should be banned from the newsrooms of CNN, Fox, Bloomberg and Global - in fact, I firmly believe they should be banned from everyone. The extreme rhetoric that social media puts forward is not compatible with peaceful, logical life.

    When you watch a major news outlet flash a tweet up on the screen, remember to take it with a grain of salt.

  • The media class obsesses over what happens in their Twitter ecosystem, bases their analysis of the real world on that ecosystem and forms a view of wider society from the prism of their disconnection. As Madrigal says: “what could go wrong?”

    Merely acknowledging that behaviour on Twitter isn't representative

    The media class obsesses over what happens in their Twitter ecosystem, bases their analysis of the real world on that ecosystem and forms a view of wider society from the prism of their disconnection. As Madrigal says: “what could go wrong?”

    Merely acknowledging that behaviour on Twitter isn't representative of the wider population (but perhaps more representative of the media class itself), would ensure that steps to reconnect with people we're supposed to provide journalism to and stand for are taken. But then again, how the media class uses/experiences Twitter is merely a symptom of a deeper problem that has plagued the media for decades now: pompous privilege masquerading as intellectual superiority.

  • The News Media likes to reference Twitter for only two reasons:

    1) It makes them look hip to social media. Some out of touch news director somewhere probably thinks tweets will help keep television news relevant to Millennials or some such.

    2) It's the old man-on-the-street-interview for today's era

    The News Media likes to reference Twitter for only two reasons:

    1) It makes them look hip to social media. Some out of touch news director somewhere probably thinks tweets will help keep television news relevant to Millennials or some such.

    2) It's the old man-on-the-street-interview for today's era of not enough money. Tweets are free to show. Street interviews cost money. Don't believe me? Let's ask Paul O'Brien standing out here on main street who read this article. Then we'll look at a tweet from @seobrien

    If the public concludes that tweets reflect what we all think, we're in far more trouble as a society than we are from the risks of fake news and other media scandals.

  • Such a shame that a service with such a profound utility - giving a global megaphone to anyone with an internet connection - often times represents the worst of us while perpetuating filter bubbles and isolation of thought. I’ve always appreciate Twitter as a service over Twitter as a business. Twitter

    Such a shame that a service with such a profound utility - giving a global megaphone to anyone with an internet connection - often times represents the worst of us while perpetuating filter bubbles and isolation of thought. I’ve always appreciate Twitter as a service over Twitter as a business. Twitter is not immune from competition either, save residual benefits from its brand name. That’s why the POTUS meeting was so important.

  • In my opinion twitter has replaced journalism for many people . It can provide a valid picture of how people are thinking in a crisis but fact checking is not a strong point. That's what some people seem to want .

  • We are aware of that...

  • Never on Twitter and no plans to. To me it’s not newsworthy, educational or anything thoughtful...just quips and rants. I don’t get the obsession with it.

  • I started using twitter as an actual micro-blog to update coworkers on what I was doing while working remotely. Nobody joined to follow me, hardly any of them use it today for anything other than professional development, while I now use it daily for anything but. This seems not too far from the norm per Pew.

  • Anyone who uses Twitter and also talks to real people in person already knows this, but it's still an interesting read.

  • More than the demographic profile of the Twitter consumer is the importance of the 10% that the article talks about. Historically even within that 10%, the majority are people that engage, share or retweet, not generating or creating the content themself. The net result is that actually a fairly small

    More than the demographic profile of the Twitter consumer is the importance of the 10% that the article talks about. Historically even within that 10%, the majority are people that engage, share or retweet, not generating or creating the content themself. The net result is that actually a fairly small percentage of the Twitter universe, and an even smaller percentage of the United States or the world are actually driving the content. That skew should be considered heavily.

  • “Twitter is not America. And few people who work outside the information industries choose to spend their lives reading tweets, let alone writing them.

    Twitter is a highly individual experience that works like a collective hallucination, not a community. It’s probably totally fine that a good chunk

    “Twitter is not America. And few people who work outside the information industries choose to spend their lives reading tweets, let alone writing them.

    Twitter is a highly individual experience that works like a collective hallucination, not a community. It’s probably totally fine that a good chunk of the nation’s elites spend so much time on it. What could go wrong?”

  • So Khalil you're saying that in direct conflict with the article, they're not intellectually superior? Why would you make that statement when it's clearly wrong? At the least they're better educated and make more money. That's not a masquerade.