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The Future of Work Could Bring More Inequality, Social Tensions

By Bloomberg

Automation, robots and globalization are rapidly changing the workplace and governments must act fast and decisively to counter the effects or face a worsening of social and economic tensions, the OECD warned

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  • The OECD highlights some of the potential workforce challenges that automation can bring, including retraining and inequality (there’s more than enough work for people to do). Whether our societies end up with good outcomes will be the product of our choices.

  • Whether we like it or not, automation is changing the workplace. #FutureOfWork includes human & machines. Governments & private sectors must work together to protect & transition those who may be impacted.

  • This is the conversation that I just had with my son as we were completing his college enrollment paperwork. This article does not even mention how race or sexual orientation intersects with these statistics, but that must be considered as well. We need to constantly be cognizant of how technology, AI specifically is changing our economy.

    "Changes in employment will hit some workers more than others -- particularly young people with lower levels of education and women who are more likely to be

    This is the conversation that I just had with my son as we were completing his college enrollment paperwork. This article does not even mention how race or sexual orientation intersects with these statistics, but that must be considered as well. We need to constantly be cognizant of how technology, AI specifically is changing our economy.

    "Changes in employment will hit some workers more than others -- particularly young people with lower levels of education and women who are more likely to be under-employed and working in low paid jobs, the OECD said."

  • The saddest part of this is that this is an issue that should have been addressed decades ago when first brought up under the Bush administration (Sr) when he spoke about the displacement by automation in oilfield workers and the dire need for training and upskilling. Since then every single politician has campaigned around education and innovation, but none have executed.

    And instead now wealth adjustment and robot taxes are being suggested instead.

    https://share.qz.com/news/2389244

    unfortunately

    The saddest part of this is that this is an issue that should have been addressed decades ago when first brought up under the Bush administration (Sr) when he spoke about the displacement by automation in oilfield workers and the dire need for training and upskilling. Since then every single politician has campaigned around education and innovation, but none have executed.

    And instead now wealth adjustment and robot taxes are being suggested instead.

    https://share.qz.com/news/2389244

    unfortunately these are Band-Aids and placebos that are not going to be effective for the long-term. If we as a nation want to be strong and competitive, we need to focus heavily on education in a way that defines competitive talent and skill sets, starting in grade school.

  • Can't stress the importance and urgency of this! We need to design better programs to absorb and reintegrate low skilled workers and those with higher risks of having their job automated. The problem is real and needs to be addressed now, not tomorrow or inequality levels will rise to the breaking point.

  • There’s good AI and bad AI. The traditional view of automation and labor is that automation increases the value of labor by increasing the productivity of a chain of tasks. This is starting to break down into something more nuanced as new automation technologies are aimed at explicitly replacing human work in smaller and smaller slices (tasks) with skills that had previously been human behavior-based skills.

    Here’s the subtlety: if the automation is “so-so” (just good enough to be adopted but not

    There’s good AI and bad AI. The traditional view of automation and labor is that automation increases the value of labor by increasing the productivity of a chain of tasks. This is starting to break down into something more nuanced as new automation technologies are aimed at explicitly replacing human work in smaller and smaller slices (tasks) with skills that had previously been human behavior-based skills.

    Here’s the subtlety: if the automation is “so-so” (just good enough to be adopted but not so much more productive than the labor being replaced), labor demand declines. This is a huge deal for AI and companies. AI has to be great. If it’s not, productivity will not increase, the cost of the product or service at the end of the chain will not decline (so no demand increase) and the only incentive becomes to remove more human labor.

    Solution: make great AI, design it as part of a system with humans not being sliced into smaller tasks and apply in industries where AI serves the greatest unmet needs: education, health and augmented reality training.

    Paper here. https://economics.mit.edu/files/16819

  • The outlook for some is challenging to say the least. Changes in employment will hit some workers more than others -- particularly young people with lower levels of education and women who are more likely to be under-employed and working in low paid jobs, the OECD said.

  • Income inequality is not news but it is important. The current maximize profit with no regard to the impacts on people and the environment is ultimately self defeating. Perhaps we need to change the nature of corporations and management.

  • I mean, isn’t this headline stating the obvious? Implicit in the concept of automation and AI taking former jobs of humans has always been closely tied to this concern.

  • The risk of automation phasing out many low level jobs is a real issue. By reformatting our work force system to more adequately absorb these employees and help relocate work for them is vital to avoiding potential social tensions and increased inequality.

  • Easy... easy folks. You just have to look upnorth. Canada 🇨🇦 has made clear that their nation/country model of inclusion will be the best way to both treat minorities and respect both race, gender and sexuality.

    There is no need to get all crazy about the future of work, since is has been already negotiated by both Mexican United States and of America, as well as Canada.

    We tech and savvy, show business and intellectual girls, and the ones added ahead, just need to prepare the stage for when

    Easy... easy folks. You just have to look upnorth. Canada 🇨🇦 has made clear that their nation/country model of inclusion will be the best way to both treat minorities and respect both race, gender and sexuality.

    There is no need to get all crazy about the future of work, since is has been already negotiated by both Mexican United States and of America, as well as Canada.

    We tech and savvy, show business and intellectual girls, and the ones added ahead, just need to prepare the stage for when we actually go off shore and separate from the mainland... that’s when we will be the whole Mexicali state.

  • I never understood the opposition to Government Supporting the People because it’s obvious to me that AI will eventually take over just about all jobs.

  • Machine learning, AI, and automation are going largely unchecked and without regulatory supervision. These “advances” are changing the complication of the workforce and workplace - and not necessarily for the better. Diversity is lacking, ageism is more prominent, and income inequality is more pronounced. Hence, the rise of Trump and populism worldwide. Isn’t that ironic? For all of the benefits we assign to the tech revolution, one of its consequences is Trump’s populism. I can appreciate why. Some

    Machine learning, AI, and automation are going largely unchecked and without regulatory supervision. These “advances” are changing the complication of the workforce and workplace - and not necessarily for the better. Diversity is lacking, ageism is more prominent, and income inequality is more pronounced. Hence, the rise of Trump and populism worldwide. Isn’t that ironic? For all of the benefits we assign to the tech revolution, one of its consequences is Trump’s populism. I can appreciate why. Some estimates have as many as 50% of the type of jobs disappearing in the decades to come. That’s scary. Are we going to be a uniform society of engineers and developers? Those who adapt and create and innovate will ultimately “win.” But I wonder what constitutes winning these days.

  • Every industrial revolution necessarily disrupts employment. And no government is ever ready - wouldn’t be much of a revolution if they were.

    The first line of this report states “the future of work presents unparalleled opportunities”. This article fails to cover that bit.

    The interesting read is the policy response paper which you can find on their website.

  • This is very interesting considering that the advanced countries began planning for the advent of the loss of jobs due to automation and digitisation. I am afraid that this does not translate so well in developing economies such as in Africa, where we are always playing catch up and in a lot of cases the governments are not as forward thinking. The number of lower level workers who will lose their jobs due to AI is set to be quite incredible and it is not clear if there are any contingency measures

    This is very interesting considering that the advanced countries began planning for the advent of the loss of jobs due to automation and digitisation. I am afraid that this does not translate so well in developing economies such as in Africa, where we are always playing catch up and in a lot of cases the governments are not as forward thinking. The number of lower level workers who will lose their jobs due to AI is set to be quite incredible and it is not clear if there are any contingency measures in place to absorb or reintegrate these workers.

  • Another silly story. Let's go back to the Stone Age, that will solve it!

  • Another well picked article, Quartz family should run the U.S. ( seriously! ) just in the last 2 weeks Quartz had a graph how we need more people to fill jobs ??? I could never get my head around this when 10 other news articles say there will not be any people doing any warehouse jobs at all or driving a truck in 10 yrs. I saw this coming begged my oldest boy “ get into Robotics” can’t believe he for once did what I said, he trained in Austria & landed a cool maintenance job keeping a Robot happy

    Another well picked article, Quartz family should run the U.S. ( seriously! ) just in the last 2 weeks Quartz had a graph how we need more people to fill jobs ??? I could never get my head around this when 10 other news articles say there will not be any people doing any warehouse jobs at all or driving a truck in 10 yrs. I saw this coming begged my oldest boy “ get into Robotics” can’t believe he for once did what I said, he trained in Austria & landed a cool maintenance job keeping a Robot happy ! Hydraulics & practical Electronics should be trades taught in every high school now ! Encourage kids to hang out at low rider car shows ! Those guys are brilliant!! Weird thing drove up the Oregon coast talked to several independent business owners who can’t find ANYBODY to work for 15.00 an hr. ???? Really ?!! They claim social net looks after too much ? Is this true ?

  • Am I alone in accepting the accuracy of the "40 Year Update of Limits To Growth"?

    The two most important points were:

    1. the tipping point was in 1975 for the global population overshoot and collapse they originally thought would be between 2030 & 2050, and

    2. The Collapse would become obvious no later than 2024.

    The first Earth Day was in 1970, as was Apollo 13, from which I learned to "Solve The Problem; Failure IS not AN option!"

    Between now and NLT 2024?

    At the risk of dating myself: "How

    Am I alone in accepting the accuracy of the "40 Year Update of Limits To Growth"?

    The two most important points were:

    1. the tipping point was in 1975 for the global population overshoot and collapse they originally thought would be between 2030 & 2050, and

    2. The Collapse would become obvious no later than 2024.

    The first Earth Day was in 1970, as was Apollo 13, from which I learned to "Solve The Problem; Failure IS not AN option!"

    Between now and NLT 2024?

    At the risk of dating myself: "How long can you tread water?"

    Waste, reused, salt, fresh frozen - releasing what pandemics as they rove round the Ocean?

    What "option" are you most likely to pick - "To BE, or not..., THAT is the option, imo. 🤔

  • I wonder why 6/10 workers would lack basic IT skills. Is there an age demographic issue? Will this number shrink as people age out of the workforce?

    Or is this a computer literacy issue?

  • A terrifying view of the future that we seem not to have answers for

  • Humans should plan for the future. We are excellent reactionaries but terrible planners, especially as it relates to abstract ideas like the "future." --think: Climate change? Physical fitness? Retirement savings? Saving budget surpluses during boom years? Quitting smoking?

    There will be no meaningful way to avert the effects of automation before it's too late. We, as humans, are incapable of action before reaching the precipice. For this reason, #werealldoomed

  • Disliking repetitive tasks requires that I find the fastest, easiest way to get a task done, which leaves me time to learn and do new things!

    The issue with automation is that displaced people are left with nothing to do and/or are incapable of learning new skills?

  • we can't resist the trend of AI replacement

  • That’s why we need UBI

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