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The ethical and legal implications of having a universal genetic database

By Quartz Membership

The idea of a universal genetic database can sound like the stuff of dystopian sci-fi. If the government had access to your entire, uniquely-identifying genetic code, it could follow every move you make based on traces of DNA you leave behind. It could be privy to all kinds of private information about your health. ItRead full story

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  • This one is tricky. On one hand, who wouldn't want the police to be able to find killers and rapists who wouldn't be identified otherwise? On the other hand, identifying suspects using DNA analysis is far less simple than crime shows make it seem, and allowing law enforcement unfettered access to anyone's DNA in the hopes they find a match is a big sacrifice on privacy. The proposal for a more limited DNA database is a good starting point for further discussion.

  • Consider the NSA claims that trying to monitor all wireless communications is a logistical black hole. A all encompassing genetic data base would be worse. Just trying to maintain it given births and deaths would require mandatory sampling without a warrant

    Imagine every sample requires a court order based on what if...

    Who has access would medical insurers? Since every major data base including the state department and the Pentagon has been comprised...and the the ethics? And tourism and diplomatic personnel?

  • As Liz says, this is a very difficult one. The genetic industry, especially the home testing kit companies have been working on and off with law enforcement for several years. However recently a couple of these companies have changed the terms of service on their contracts with consumers because they have proactively reached out to the FBI to offer their genetic database. Genetic information like any other information is subject to privacy regulations in many countries, however in instances of public

    As Liz says, this is a very difficult one. The genetic industry, especially the home testing kit companies have been working on and off with law enforcement for several years. However recently a couple of these companies have changed the terms of service on their contracts with consumers because they have proactively reached out to the FBI to offer their genetic database. Genetic information like any other information is subject to privacy regulations in many countries, however in instances of public welfare the choices become much more complicated. Do we fore sake our privacy for the common good of society? Is this the same quandary as measles shots?

  • This could spell disaster from a narrative perspective

  • Blockchain

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