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The Affluent Homeless: A Sleeping Pod, A Hired Desk And A Handful Of Clothes

The Affluent Homeless: A Sleeping Pod, A Hired Desk And A Handful Of Clothes

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  • Homeless is when you do not have money for shelter. It is not when you Uber to the gym from your pod share and revel in minimalism while running a business. Very strange formulation here.

  • Overblown as a trend but fascinating nonetheless, and a hint that economic growth will continue to be driven by experiences and by enhancements to the brain as the primary vehicle for experiencing experiences.

  • I can’t wait to look back at this piece and those like in about a decade— because this is so true: “they hoard digitally. They have tons of photographs. They have thousands and thousands of Instagram posts.".. so just as their older friends and relatives are weighed down by physical stuff- will they

    I can’t wait to look back at this piece and those like in about a decade— because this is so true: “they hoard digitally. They have tons of photographs. They have thousands and thousands of Instagram posts.".. so just as their older friends and relatives are weighed down by physical stuff- will they start to feel overwhelmed by the sheer volume of digital content they have created- the organizational challenges, the terabytes of data they start storing in clouds.. will we see a surge of marie kondo-like inspired digital content cleanup?

  • The glorification of privileged, educated, employed people choosing a life of minimalism is a slap in the face to all those who can't afford the privilege of choosing to be homeless. Sure, it's a great way to save money and allow people to focus on what they feel is important—work, independence, fear

    The glorification of privileged, educated, employed people choosing a life of minimalism is a slap in the face to all those who can't afford the privilege of choosing to be homeless. Sure, it's a great way to save money and allow people to focus on what they feel is important—work, independence, fear of commitment, etc.—but, like Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey's weird diets, or Silicon Valley's obsessive search for immortality, it's just another disconnect from the real world and the true responsibilities of community and family.

  • I have been intentionally homeless and met others who did this... It empowers me to do work that doesnt pay, or take risks others wouldn't. It started because I couldnt find a job while i was in school in San Francisco but became a way of life as I made friends on couchsurfing and then learned to make

    I have been intentionally homeless and met others who did this... It empowers me to do work that doesnt pay, or take risks others wouldn't. It started because I couldnt find a job while i was in school in San Francisco but became a way of life as I made friends on couchsurfing and then learned to make friends in new cities. It's almost a whole class of people, those engaged in a supra-economic culture. The dark side of this is freeloaders, squatters, drugs, con artists. I now manage a farm, work in a jewelry store, and design for CAD/CAM.

  • Great PR for/by Podshare. NOT actually a trend at all. But good PR.

  • Interesting idea, but the title of this article is way off. This dude isn’t homeless, he is merely a minimalist. Almost a touch of John Calvin, which is to be admired. I wonder if this trend will last?

  • This is interesting, but I certainly would not refer to it as homelessness. The people described here could very easily find themselves permanent places to stay and choose not to. The homeless do not have that luxury.

  • We keep saying that money doesn’t equal happiness. And since the traditional notion of how money makes you happy is buying a lot of stuff, doesn’t this reflect societal progress towards rejecting one of capitalism’s biggest misconceptions?

  • What a way to live. Without anything but able to use everything?

    “Steven T. Johnson, 27, works in social media advertising and lives in Hollywood. He spends most of his days using things he does not own.

    He takes a ride-share service to get to the gym; he does not own a car. At the gym, he rents a

    What a way to live. Without anything but able to use everything?

    “Steven T. Johnson, 27, works in social media advertising and lives in Hollywood. He spends most of his days using things he does not own.

    He takes a ride-share service to get to the gym; he does not own a car. At the gym, he rents a locker. He uses the gym's laundry service because he does not own a washing machine.”

  • Interesting concept and we have been hearing about this for sometime now. Question is how much will this be sustainable? Will we see physical consolidation into the hands of few (as the rest will be renting from them) or it will head towards another extreme socialist view where everything will be free..

  • OK. But this all stops when you start talking about mortgage payments, tuition payments, getting your young ones to school and back at different times not to mention various locations for each child @ violin, swimming, soccer, etc. I won't even mention the two week vacation with kids to grandma's house..

    OK. But this all stops when you start talking about mortgage payments, tuition payments, getting your young ones to school and back at different times not to mention various locations for each child @ violin, swimming, soccer, etc. I won't even mention the two week vacation with kids to grandma's house... Yeah, maybe if you live in Copenhagen your family won't need to own the car, house, ride around mower...here in America articles like this are glorifying the fact that we have locked entire generations out of being parents because they can no longer afford it......

  • Homeless by choice, co-living, and co-working. Is shared economy taking over or Minimalist Living to the next level?

  • “Experience over Stuff” is the lens of the Millennial generation, much as “Freedom over Conformity” was the lens of their Boomer parents. It is at least in part a response to the trauma of the Great Recession, in which Millennials observed directly that careers, houses, financial portfolios, and cars

    “Experience over Stuff” is the lens of the Millennial generation, much as “Freedom over Conformity” was the lens of their Boomer parents. It is at least in part a response to the trauma of the Great Recession, in which Millennials observed directly that careers, houses, financial portfolios, and cars could all be irretrievably lost in a blink. In contrast, experiences are inalienable, and perfectly portable.

    For Millennials the positive consequence has been a focus on mobility, community, reduced consumption, and economic self-reliance in the form of entrepreneurialism. The “Digital Gypsies” in this story are the purest expression of these values, and are a vanguard sliver of their generation; they don’t represent a trend.

    The negative consequence is an overemphasis on experience that gives rise to a privatized and relativized truth where personal narrative trumps any notion of an objective reality, or even of a common good. This will likely bear bitter fruit in the form of rootlessness and despair, as Millennials strive to reconcile their personal narratives with the inherently public narrative of their community. This is the essential conflict of intersectionality.

    Given that the Millennials are the population echo of the Boomers, they will demographically define the culture for the next 40 years, and it will be fascinating to observe these values played out.

  • I knew that young people were leaning into the rental or sharing economy — owning less of everything and renting and sharing a whole lot more like housing, cars, music and workspaces. I didn't know that in some places, such as LA, this rental life has gone to an extreme and now includes beds as in Podshare.

  • There is no trend for this movement. This is not right for 99.999999999% of people. For every Mark Zuckerberg, there is the rest of us who want to live normal lives where we choose a comfortable life.

  • What an awesome way to live life! And when they want to have a family let's hope this generation will think of sharing economies for families. It's hard to raise kids on your own!

  • This is exactly what immigrants have done to survive when first getting here. Room shares, but obvi not in expensive neighborhoods, and $1300 - $1400 a person in a bunk bed, although I like the idea of less stuff and accessibility to a certain location it’s still a bit of extortion to share a home. The

    This is exactly what immigrants have done to survive when first getting here. Room shares, but obvi not in expensive neighborhoods, and $1300 - $1400 a person in a bunk bed, although I like the idea of less stuff and accessibility to a certain location it’s still a bit of extortion to share a home. The article doesn’t dig deep so does this $1400 price tag include food or other things not mentioned? I like the idea, but how much is it helping the young folks or helping those pocketing the rent. It is the way of the world.

  • Affluent means rich... Renting a tiny sleeping closet isn’t something a rich person does. It’s something a poor person does... The end...

  • Due to [our] crippling student loan debt, we can't afford homes, spouses, or children... we can only afford to take risks that hopefully allow us to make a difference of global conscientiousness.

  • When you own stuff, does your stuff own you?

  • This trend/fad is going to be but a blip in the necessary and ultimately put if our hands transition we all will be experiencing in the coming years and decades. Share economies will essentially be an integral part of resilient communities who are weathering the shifting climate and reality that environmental

    This trend/fad is going to be but a blip in the necessary and ultimately put if our hands transition we all will be experiencing in the coming years and decades. Share economies will essentially be an integral part of resilient communities who are weathering the shifting climate and reality that environmental breakdown is presenting us with. Cheap, abundant oil (fossil fuels) has allowed for capitalism and our current form of civilization to exist. This is going to change drastically in short order and these charming critiques of the “affluent homeless” will indeed be a charming story to reflect on.

  • This is not what I call “affluent”, they may have above average income, but they are housing poor, and while it may seem adventurous at first, they are going to feel their poverty later on. Many may be waiting for an IPO to make them instant millionaires, but that won’t happen to all of them. By the

    This is not what I call “affluent”, they may have above average income, but they are housing poor, and while it may seem adventurous at first, they are going to feel their poverty later on. Many may be waiting for an IPO to make them instant millionaires, but that won’t happen to all of them. By the way “A Sleeping Pod, A Hired Desk And A Handful Of Clothes”, sounds like a $4,000 a month apartment in San Francisco.

  • Awesome idea! Although it’s not for me I’m confident that for many many people it fits their lifestyle just perfectly! Interesting concept!

  • Interesting lifestyle choices for the new generations!

  • Renting and sharing are not the issue, as long as the money and time that is saved from the shared economy is not spent totally on video games that are designed to be addictive, or other forms of social media that are likewise designed with no ethical considerations.

  • The past is the future...